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Safety While Trick or Treating

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When it comes to Halloween, our doctors have seen it all — from allergic reactions to candy to traffic accidents. Most are preventable! Experts at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital share their best tips for keeping your children healthy and safe while trick or treating and more:

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Hair Raising Tales of Lice and Tips From Loyola Specialist

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Autumn brings tales of scary delight, but none terrifies parents so much as the note home from school that a case of lice has been detected. “While the make-believe vampires are prowling for candy, head lice are looking for a real blood meal,” said Dr. Andrew Bonwit, a pediatric infectious disease expert at Loyola University Health System.

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Tips to Trick or Treat Safely From the Scariest Place of all - The Emergency Department

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Each year, 9.2 million babies, children, and teens are injured severely enough to need treatment in emergency departments all across America, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Nothing is scarier than a trip to the emergency room," said Mark Cichon, DO, chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Loyola University Health System. "In a season devoted to frights, it is our goal to keep everyone safe

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A Toothy Grin Lasts After Halloween Says Loyola Dentist

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A big sack of candy is the top priority of children at Halloween but with some easy substitutions, adults can offers kids treats that preserve dental health and Halloween fun. "Every year right after Halloween I get emergency visits from parents with kids who have damaged teeth caused by Halloween candy," says Martin Hogan, DDS, division director of dentistry, Loyola University Health System.

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New Treatment Resolves Hazardous Airway Complication in Child with Heart Disease

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In children with a heart condition, lymph can ooze into airways and dry into a rubbery, potentially life-threatening cast. A new, noninvasive treatment cleared this blockage in a 6-year-old boy.

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Indiana Project Screenings Show Need for More Mental Health Services in Youth Detention

Indiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health showed that more mental health screenings and services are needed for juvenile offenders.

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Keep Kids Safe So Halloween Doesn’t Become a Nightmare on Your Street

For one night you get to be someone completely different, have a mission of collecting candy at every house you see and it’s OK to be scared. It’s no wonder Halloween has become one of the most exciting holidays for kids. But, without some safety reminders a child’s dream come true could turn into a parent’s worst nightmare.

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Study Documents Significant Rise in E-Cigarette Use Among Youth in Poland

Research led by Maciej Goniewicz, PhD, PharmD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute shows that use of electronic cigarettes among students in Poland has increased dramatically, rising more than threefold in just the last three years.

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Screening Questions Fail to Identify Teens at Risk for Hearing Loss

Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.

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After Heart Ailments, Urological Issues are the Most Common Conditions for Newborns, and Those Ailments Affect Girls More Than Boys

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Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) physician Roger E. De Filippo, MD, chief of CHLA's Division of Urology and an associate professor of urology and director of Pediatric Urology Stem Cell Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California discusses how science, technology and parental care can lead to improved pediatric urological health.

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