Feature Channels

Children's Health

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Jul-2014 2:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Simple Growing Pains or Something More?

CherianJulie_CMYK_5X8_REV_1.jpg

Most people associate arthritis with aging, but the fact is, one in 1,000 children is diagnosed with juvenile arthritis. Stony Brook Children’s Hospital’s Pediatric Rheumatologist Dr. Julie Cherian addresses the most common questions from parents — and discusses what they can do if they suspect their child may have arthritis.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

GW Researcher Receives Grant to Answer the How and Why of Autism During Development

Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and physiology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, received a $739K grant from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative to study the link between autism and disrupted brain development.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Reminder for Adults: Immunizations Are Still Needed and Can Be Lifesaving

Though kids often stay on track with receiving vaccines due to school requirements, with no system in place, adult rates remain low, according to one UAB expert.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Scott & White – Cedar Park West Clinic Offers Computerized ADHD Testing

Arti Lal, MD, a pediatrician who specializes in treating patients at the ADHD Clinic at Scott & White in North Austin, is currently utilizing a new technology on patients which is called the Quotient® ADHD Test. It is FDA-cleared for the objective measurement of hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention, as an aid in the assessment of ADHD.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Dartmouth Pediatrician Urges Passage of Senate's Child Nicotine Poisoning Prevention Act of 2014

MD_Sargent_James9899.jpg

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Genetic Test Helps Predict Which Children with Kidney Disease Will Respond to Standard Therapy

• Among children with sporadic nephrotic syndrome, genetic mutations in the kidney’s filtration barrier were frequently linked with a lack of response to immunosuppressive treatments. • The genetic test was even more predictive than a kidney biopsy for identifying children who would not benefit from immunosuppressive therapies.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Report: Vulnerable Populations Disproportionately Affected by Food Security, Despite Public Programs

small_S_Beaulieu0916.jpg

Vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, ethnic minorities, and low-income households are disproportionately affected by food security, despite the extensive private and public food safety net in the United States, according to a new report by RTI International.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Continuous Antibiotics Not Necessary for Many Children with Common Prenatal Abnormality

Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the U.S. Many children with this abnormality are treated continually with preventive antibiotics for the first few years of life with the hopes of preventing the condition’s associated urinary tract infections. Until recently, however, little evidence existed as to the benefits of this treatment, which involves considerable cost and inconvenience for families. But a new study found that, in most cases, continuous antibiotics for these children are unnecessary, findings that are especially of interest amidst increasing concern regarding antibiotic overuse.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure and Herpes Infection in Infants Examined by Penn Medicine Analysis

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found.

View | Comment