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Age Matters: Discovering Why Antidepressants Don’t Work Well For Kids

Nathan Mitchell, a graduate student at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio wanted to know why the therapeutic benefit afforded by SSRIs was so limited in children and teenagers. If researchers can uncover the biological mechanisms preventing available treatments from producing antidepressant effects, scientists can then target those mechanisms to develop new antidepressants that will treat childhood and adolescent depression more effectively.

Life

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What Makes a Child Feel Unsafe in Their Neighbourhood?

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Differences in the way children and adults perceive the world extend to their sense of safety in their social and physical environments and this in turn can impact their health, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Research Centre at CHU Sainte Justine, a children’s hospital.

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Teens with Breast Lumps May Be Able to Avoid Invasive Biopsy

If a lump is found in the breast of an adolescent girl, she often will undergo an excisional biopsy. However, breast cancer is rare in adolescents, and the vast majority of teenage breast lumps turn out to be benign masses that are related to hormones and often go away over time.

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Sleep Apnea During Pregnancy Is Not Good for Mother or Baby

Researchers find that having sleep apnea while pregnant could make the baby prone to metabolic disease as an adult.

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Prebiotic Shows Promise in Regulating Kids’ Appetites

The obesity epidemic among children has caused alarm throughout the United States and Canada. Achieving healthy energy intake among this age group is a widespread health concern. A new method of appetite regulation in children was recently investigated by graduate student Megan Hume from University of Calgary.

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RSV: Common Virus on the Rise That Can Be Dangerous in Children

Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a common virus that infects the lungs and breathing passageways, has been on the rise across the nation for the last several years. Though it may only produce minor cold symptoms in adults, it can lead to serious illness in young children and those with compromised immune systems.

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Study: Hip Replacement an Excellent Option to Relieve Pain in Juvenile Arthritis Patients Under Age 35

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A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that hip replacement surgery is an excellent option to alleviate pain and improve function in juvenile arthritis patients under age 35 when conservative treatments fail to provide relief.

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How High is Too High For a Child’s Fever? Vanderbilt Doctor Offers Answers

One of the most common questions pediatricians hear about fevers is “How high is too high?” The answer: A fever in itself is not dangerous, but may be an indication of something else that needs medical attention, said Mary Kay Bartek, M.D., a general pediatrician at the Vanderbilt Children’s After-Hours Clinic in Mt. Juliet, Tennessee.

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Penn Medicine Experts Offer Suggestions for Nudging Children toward Healthier Food Choices

Strategies aimed at reducing childhood obesity should acknowledge individuals’ rational taste preferences and apply insights from behavioral economics to design choice architecture that increases their likelihood of success, say two physician-scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics in an editorial published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Does Your Baby Have a Stuffy Nose?

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“Babies can’t blow their nose so caregivers can feel helpless in offering relief,” says Andrew Hotaling, MD, FACS, FAAP, pediatric otolaryngologist at Loyola University Medical Center. “Breathing is essential to baby’s health and stuffy noses can indicate something more serious.”