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In Infants, Pain from Vaccinations Shows Up in Brain Activity

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Infants show distinct, consistent patterns of brain activity in response to painful vaccinations, reports a study in the February issue of PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Morphine Following Common Childhood Surgery May Be Life Threatening

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The study has identified a significant risk for potentially-fatal breathing disruption when morphine is administered at home after surgery to treat pain in children who undergo tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy.

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Study Finds Lead Negatively Impacts Cognitive Functions of Boys More than Girls

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The female hormones estrogen and estradiol may help ward off the effects of lead exposure for young girls, explaining why boys, are shown to suffer more often from the cognitive disabilities linked to lead.

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Pro-Marijuana ‘Tweets’ Are Sky-High on Twitter

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Analyzing every marijuana-related Twitter message sent during a one-month period in early 2014, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found that the “Twitterverse” is a pot-friendly place. In that time, more than 7 million tweets referenced marijuana, with 15 times as many pro-pot tweets sent as anti-pot tweets.

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New Research at Baylor Could Give Alternatives for Children's Eye Exams

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It’s very difficult to understand the retinal structure of children because they are known to be uncooperative during eye examinations designed for adults. Baylor research, published in JAMA Ophthalmology, explores a new non-invasive technology that’s kind of like a handheld CT scanner for the eye.

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New Treatments Haven't Lowered Anesthesia Risks for Children with Pulmonary Hypertension, Reports Anesthesia & Analgesia

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Despite effective new treatments for their disease, children with pulmonary hypertension (PHT) are still a high-risk group for serious complications and death related to anesthesia and surgery, reports a study in the February issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Sleeping on Stomach May Increase Risk of Sudden Death in Epilepsy

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New research shows that stomach sleepers with epilepsy may be at higher risk of sudden unexpected death, drawing parallels to sudden infant death syndrome in babies. The study is published in the January 21, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Humanity Has Exceeded 4 of 9 ‘Planetary Boundaries,’ According to Researchers

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An international team of researchers says climate change, the loss of biosphere integrity, land-system change, and altered biogeochemical cycles like phosphorus and nitrogen runoff have all passed beyond levels that put humanity in a “safe operating space.” Civilization has crossed four of nine so-called planetary boundaries as the result of human activity, according to a report published today in Science by the 18-member research team.

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Century-Old Drug Reverses Autism-Like Symptoms in Fragile X Mouse Model

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Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine previously reported that a drug used for almost a century to treat trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, reversed environmental autism-like symptoms in mice. Now, a new study published in this week’s online issue of Molecular Autism, suggests that a genetic form of autism-like symptoms in mice are also corrected with the drug, even when treatment was started in young adult mice.

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Difficult Behavior in Young Children May Point to Later Problems

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It’s normal for a very young child to have tantrums and be otherwise disruptive, but researchers have found that if such behavior is prolonged or especially intense, the child may have conduct disorder. The Washington University team, led by senior investigator Joan L. Luby, MD, recommends that children who exhibit these symptoms be referred to mental health professionals for evaluation and possible intervention.