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Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Infectious Disease, inflammasome, Immunology, IRGB10 , danger-sensing proteins, Cytoplasm, Interferon

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Sep-2016 12:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Diabetes, pediatric diabetes, Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, diabetes and endocrinology, Endocrinology, insulin management, Glucose

Diabetes in Children Is a Chronic – But Treatable -- Disease

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For those people living with diabetes, every day requires around-the-clock monitoring and management. So says Jason A. Klein, MD, a pediatric endocrinologist who heads the Pediatric Diabetes Program at NYU Lutheran and who also works collaboratively with colleagues at the Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital of New York at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Pediatric Diabetes Center.

Medicine

Science

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Energy Drinks, Alcohol, Drunk Driving, caffein, energy drinks mixed with alcohol, Students, Parents, Clinicians, college administrators

Energy Drink Use, with or Without Alcohol, Contributes to Drunk Driving

Highly caffeinated energy drinks (EDs) have been of concern to the public-health community for almost a decade. Many young people consume EDs with alcohol to decrease alcohol’s sedative effects and stay awake longer, enabling them to drink more alcohol. Adding to the growing body of research linking ED consumption with risk-taking and alcohol-related problems, this study examined its relationship with drunk driving. Importantly, the researchers differentiated between the different ways in which EDs are consumed: exclusively with alcohol, exclusively without alcohol, or both with and without alcohol depending on the occasion.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Children's Fitness, University Of North Dakota, Grant Tomkinson, UND, Children's Health, Aerobic Fitness

U.S. Children Are Less Fit Than Others Around the World

An international research team co-led from the University of North Dakota and the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) studied the aerobic fitness levels of children and youth across 50 countries. The results were just published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The U.S. ranked 47 of 50.

Medicine

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Hypertension in children, High blood pressure in children, cognitive issues, Cognitive Skills, The Journal of Pediatrics

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Sep-2016 12:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, Infectious Disease, Diarrhea, diarrhea causes, Developing World, Eric Houpt, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Shigella, E. Coli, Bacteria, Cryptosporidium, Parasite, Parasites, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Campylobacter, Campylobacter Jejuni, Bangladesh, India, Africa, Pakistan, Mozambique, Kenya, Mali, The Gambia, G

Surprising Findings on Deadly Diarrhea Suggest Ways to Save Children's Lives

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens has been vastly underestimated.

Medicine

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Columbia to Participate in NIH Environment and Child Health Initiative

Columbia University Medical Center researchers will participate in a seven-year NIH initiative to study the effect of a wide range of environmental factors on the health of children and adolescents.

Medicine

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Craniofacial

Measurement Helps Craniofacial Surgeons Better Evaluate Children with Skull Deformity

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A baby’s skull is made of several plates of bone that fuse together over time to form a single structure. Previous research has shown that approximately one in 2,000 babies have plates that fuse too early — a condition called craniosynostosis — causing cranial deformities that can lead to learning impairments and other neurodevelopmental problems. Craniofacial surgeons across the country differ on when surgical intervention is needed for some abnormalities. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine are recommending a new method to help determine when surgery is needed.

Business

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"Arnold Palmer", arnold Palmer, arnold palmer hospital, arnold palmer hospital for children, winnie palmer hospital, winnie palmer hospital for women & babies, golf, Pediatrics, Women's Health, Children's Health, Orlando Health

Arnold Palmer Medical Center Reacts to Passing of Arnold Palmer

It is a sad time for everyone at Orlando Health Arnold Palmer Medical Center after receiving news of the passing of the legendary Arnold Palmer.

Medicine

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University of Chicago Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, University of Chicago Medical , Bradley Stolbach, John Cunningham, Healing Hurt People - Chicago, Emergency Department, Pediatrics, Violence, Trauma, Chicago, Mental Health, SAMHSA, trauma exposure, PTSD, Community Violence

Comer Children’s Wins $2M Federal Grant to Help Kids Affected by Violence

The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital will provide screening and mental health care for hundreds of children and families that have been affected by violence in many of Chicago’s South and West side neighborhoods.

Medicine

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HIV and AIDS, Youth at Risk, Youth, Health, Lgbt, Transgender, Technology, mobile applications, Virtual Reality

UNC Receives $18 Million to Develop Mobile Technology to Prevent and Treat HIV in Adolescents

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People under the age of 30 account for the majority of new HIV infections in the United States. This age group is also more likely than adults to own a smartphone. Recognizing adolescents’ connection with mobile technology, a research team at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, along with colleagues at Emory University, has secured $18 million in funding over the next five years from the National Institutes of Health to form the UNC/Emory Center for Innovative Technology or iTech.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Pregnancy, Premature Birth, Low Birth Weight, Birth Outcomes, maternal hearing loss, American Journal of Preventive Medicine

Women with Hearing Loss More Likely to Have Preterm or Low Birth Weight Babies

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Hearing loss is a marginalizing and disabling condition, resulting in various adverse social and health outcomes. Babies born to women with hearing loss were significantly more likely to be premature and have low birth weight, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Understanding and addressing the causes are critical to improving pregnancy outcomes among women with hearing loss, say investigators.

Medicine

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ACSM, Metabolic Syndrome, Fitness, Children, Research

Childhood Muscular Fitness and Adult Metabolic Syndrome

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Latest Research from ACSM

Medicine

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children's hospital of Michigan, DMC, Pediatric Surgery, luanne ewald

The Children’s Hospital of Michigan Earns EXCELLENCE THROUGH INSIGHT

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The Children’s Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center (DMC) was recently recognized with an Excellence through Insight award for “Overall Outpatient Surgery Experience” in the Pediatrics Unit Category by HealthStream, Inc. (NASDAQ: HSTM)

Medicine

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Childhood Cancer, Leukemia, Pediatric Cancer, pediatric leukemia, Cancer Research

Identical 5-Year-Old Twins with Identical Cancers

These twin brothers are experiencing the unimaginable together – battling cancer.

Medicine

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Eczema, Vitamin B, Maternal Health

Vitamin B Levels During Pregnancy Linked to Eczema Risk in Child

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Pulmonanry, Life Support, Pediatrics

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia and NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital Achieve Platinum Level Excellence in Life Support Award

The Center for Acute Respiratory Failure and Cardiac ECMO Program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center and the Pediatric ECMO Program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital have been designated a Platinum Level Center of Excellence for the Excellence in Life Support Award from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO, an international non-profit consortium dedicated to the development of novel therapies for people with organ failure).

Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Atopic Dermatitis, Eczema, Pediatrics, Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology, Immunology

Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis May Benefit From Early Immune Intervention

Mount Sinai researchers identify association between pediatric eczema and large abnormalities in non-lesional skin and multi T lymphocyte axes activation

Medicine

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Venous Thromboembolism, Postpartum, DVT, Pregnancy, Pulmonary Embolism, Chest, Cesarean Section

Cesarean Section Carries Increased Risk for Postpartum Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

Roughly one-third of all births in Europe and North America now occur via cesarean section (CS). Following any birth, women are at an increased risk for a venous thromboembolism (VTE), but it’s believed that CS leaves women more vulnerable to VTE, blood clots, than vaginal delivery (VD). A new study published in CHEST determined that there is a link between CS and an increased absolute risk of VTE, including pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. Investigators found that CS was associated with a higher rate of overall VTE risk, with emergency CS associated with the greatest risk.

Medicine

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environmental exposures, Stress, Neurodevelopment, Neonatology, Microbiome, socio-economic status, Health Disparities, stress during pregnancy, Prenatal Health, Cognitive Deficits

UChicago Among Institutions Nationwide to Get $157 Million in NIH Awards

University of Chicago researchers will receive about $5 million in the first two years of a seven-year initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO), which will investigate how exposure to a range of environmental factors in early development influences the health of children.







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