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Signaling Molecule Crucial to Stem Cell Reprogramming

While investigating a rare genetic disorder, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a ubiquitous signaling molecule is crucial to cellular reprogramming, a finding with significant implications for stem cell-based regenerative medicine, wound repair therapies and potential cancer treatments.

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Delivery of Stem Cells into Heart Muscle After Heart Attack May Enhance Cardiac Repair and Reverse Injury

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue.

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UCLA Stem Cell Researcher Pioneers Gene Therapy Cure for Children with “Bubble Baby” Disease

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UCLA stem cell researchers cured 18 children born without a working immune system due to life-threatening ADA-deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID). Breakthrough stem cell gene therapy developed by Dr. Donald Kohn and team identifies and corrects faulty gene in children with ADA-deficient SCID using child’s own cells.

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Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy May Heal Heart Damage Caused by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute have found that injections of cardiac stem cells might help reverse heart damage caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, potentially resulting in a longer life expectancy for patients with the chronic muscle-wasting disease.

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Morgridge Scientists Find Way to ‘Keep the Lights on’ for Cell Self-Renewal

A team from the Morgridge Institute for Research regenerative biology group, led by University of Wisconsin-Madison professor and stem cell pioneer James Thomson, discovered a way to impose an immortal-like state on mouse progenitor cells responsible for producing blood and vascular tissue. By regulating a small number of genes, the cells became “trapped” in a self-renewing state and capable of producing functional endothelial, blood and smooth muscle cells.

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UCLA Researchers Identify Unique Protein Key to the Development of Blood Stem Cells

UCLA stem cell scientists discover unique cell surface protein GPI-80 that is key to self-renewal of hematopoietic (blood forming) stem cells (HSCs) during human development. Discovery paves the way for scientists to distinguish HSCs from their short-lived daughter cells and identify the unique properties that enable them to self-renew.

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Salk Scientists Discover a Key to Mending Broken Hearts

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Researchers regenerate and heal mouse hearts by using the molecular machinery the animals had all along.

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Before There Will Be Blood

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Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe the surprising and crucial involvement of a pro-inflammatory signaling protein in the creation of hematopoietic stem cells (HScs) during embryonic development, a finding that could help scientists to finally reproduce HSCs for therapeutic use.

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Direct Generation of Neural Stem Cells Could Enable Transplantation Therapy

Induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) hold promise for therapeutic transplantation, but their potential in this capacity has been limited by failed efforts to maintain such cells in their multi-potent NSC state. Now, Whitehead Institute scientists have created iNSCs that remain in the multi-potent state—without ongoing expression of reprogramming factors. This allows the iNSCs to self-renew repeatedly to generate cells in quantities sufficient for therapy.

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UCLA Gene Discovery Shows How Stem Cells Can Be Activated to Help Immune System Respond to Infection

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UCLA scientists show that two genes not previously known to be involved with the immune system play an active role in directing stem cells to fight infection

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