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'Stealth' Nanoparticles Could Improve Cancer Vaccines


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Cancer vaccines have recently emerged as a promising approach for killing tumor cells before they spread. But so far, most clinical candidates haven't worked that well. Now, scientists have developed a new way to deliver vaccines that successfully stifled tumor growth when tested in laboratory mice. And the key, they report in the journal ACS Nano, is in the vaccine's unique stealthy nanoparticles.

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Taking Thin Films to the Extreme

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Applying a well-known optical phenomenon called thin-film interference, a group of researchers at Harvard University has demonstrated the ability to "paint" ultra-thin coatings onto a rough surface -- work that holds promise for making future, flexible electronic devices, creating advanced solar cells and detailing the sides of next-gen rocket ships and spacecraft with extremely lightweight decorative logos (Applied Physics Letters).

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How Things Coil

Columbia Engineering and MIT researchers have combined computer simulations designed for Hollywood with precision model experiments to examine the mechanics of coiling. Their study, which bridges engineering mechanics and computer graphics, impacts a variety of engineering applications, from the fabrication of nanotube serpentines to the laying of submarine cables and pipelines (published 9/29 PNAS Early Online edition).

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Supersensitive Nanodevice Can Detect Extremely Early Cancers

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Extremely early detection of cancers and diseases is on the horizon with a supersensitive nanodevice being developed at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) with The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN) in Greensboro, NC.

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Future Flexible Electronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes

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Researchers have demonstrated a new method to improve the reliability and performance of transistors and circuits based on carbon nanotubes (CNT), a semiconductor material that has long been considered by scientists as one of the most promising successors to silicon for smaller, faster and cheaper electronic devices. The result appears in a new paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

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A Nanosized Hydrogen Generator

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Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have created a small scale “hydrogen generator” that uses light and a two-dimensional graphene platform to boost production of the hard-to-make element.

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Combining Antibodies, Iron Nanoparticles and Magnets Steers Stem Cells to Injured Organs

Researchers at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute infused antibody-studded iron nanoparticles into the bloodstream to treat heart attack damage. The combined nanoparticle enabled precise localization of the body’s own stem cells to the injured heart muscle. The study addresses a central challenge in stem cell therapeutics: how to achieve targeted interactions between stem cells and injured cells.

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Texas A&M Prof Helps To Develop New Device That Detects Radiation Better Than Ever

In a move that could have huge implications for national security, researchers have created a very sensitive and tiny detector that is capable of detecting radiation from various sources at room temperature. The detector is eight to nine orders of magnitude --100 million to as high as 1 billion -- times faster than the existing technology, and a Texas A&M University at Galveston professor is a key player in the discovery.

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Doped Graphene Nanoribbons with Potential

Graphene is a semiconductor when prepared as an ultra-narrow ribbon – although the material is actually a conductive material. Researchers from Empa and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now developed a new method to selectively dope graphene molecules with nitrogen atoms. By seamlessly stringing together doped and undoped graphene pieces, they were able to form ”heterojunctions” in the nanoribbons, thereby fulfilling a basic requirement for electronic current to flow in only one direction when voltage is applied – the first step towards a graphene transistor. Furthermore, the team has successfully managed to remove graphene nanoribbons from the gold substrate on which they were grown and to transfer them onto a non-conductive material.

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Rethinking the Basic Science of Graphene Synthesis

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A new route to making graphene has been discovered by Penn State researchers that could make the 21st century’s wonder material easier to ramp up to industrial scale.

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