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Article ID: 696302

Not always bad — MXenes’ spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocomposites

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar’s top-rated, peer-reviewed scientific journals.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696250

Carbon Nanotube Optics Poised to Provide Pathway to Optical-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computing

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week’s edition of the journal Nature Materials.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696106

Scientists Create Continuously Emitting Microlasers With Nanoparticle-Coated Beads

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood serum.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 1:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696148

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive

University of California San Diego

Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at of large groups of neurons and individual brain cells.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696089

Zili Wu: Beating plants at photosynthetic step with help from catalysts

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Profiled is Zili Wu of the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who leads ORNL’s Surface Chemistry and Catalysis group and conducts research at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, a DOE Office of Science User Facility at ORNL.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695983

Making Quantum Puddles

University of Vermont

A team of physicists at the University of Vermont have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. Their study may allow scientists to create the thinnest films of liquid ever made—and engineer a new class of surface coatings and lubricants just a few atoms thick.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695918

Physicist receives prestigious 2018 Cottrell Scholar Award

Northern Arizona University

By Julie Hammonds Office of the Vice President for ResearchA Northern Arizona University physicist who studies complex, hybrid nanomaterials has been recognized for his academic leadership and the quality and innovation of his research. The Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA) recently named assistant professor John Gibbs a 2018 Cottrell Scholar.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695789

Non-Crystal Clarity: Scientists Find Ordered Magnetic Patterns in Disordered Magnetic Material

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of scientists working at Berkeley Lab has confirmed a special property known as “chirality” – which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way – in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure.

Released:
8-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695562

Single Molecular Insulator Pushes Boundaries of Current State of the Art

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Researchers have synthesized the first molecule capable of insulating at the nanometer scale more effectively than a vacuum barrier. The team’s insight was to exploit the wave nature of electrons. By designing an extremely rigid silicon-based molecule under 1 nm in length that exhibited comprehensive destructive interference signatures, they devised a novel technique for blocking tunnelling conduction. This new design principle has the potential to support continued miniaturization of classic transistors in the near term.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695647

Nanotechnology for Plant Nutrition

American Technion Society

Technion researchers have found they can significantly increase agricultural yields, by using nanoscale delivery platforms that until now were used to transport drugs to specific targets in a patient's body. The technology increases the penetration rate of nutrients into the plant, from 1% to approximately 33%.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 4:20 PM EDT
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