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NUS Scientists Use Simple, Low Cost Laser Technique to Improve Properties and Functions of Nanomaterials

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By ‘drawing’ micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications

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With ‘Ribbons’ of Graphene, Width Matters

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A novel method for producing ultra-narrow ribbons of graphene and then tuning the material's electrical properties holds promise for use in nano-devices.

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Bringing the Bling to Antibacterials

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Bacteria love to colonize surfaces inside your body, but they have a hard time getting past your skin. Surgeries to implant medical devices give such bacteria the opportunity needed to gain entry into the body cavity, allowing the implants themselves to act then as an ideal growing surface for biofilms. Researchers are looking to combat these dangerous sub-dermal infections by upgrading your new hip or kneecap in a fashion appreciated since ancient times – adding gold.

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Silver in the Washing Machine

The antibacterial properties of silver-coated textiles are popular in the fields of sport and medicine. A team at Empa has now investigated how different silver coatings behave in the washing machine, and they have discovered something important: textiles with nano-coatings release fewer nano-particles into the washing water than those with normal coatings.

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Diamond Plates Create Nanostructures Through Pressure, Not Chemistry

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Mechanical force -- about the same that raises the numerals on credit cards -- proves to be a much more varied and ecological creator of nanostructures than the current method of choice, chemistry, with its unvarying results and harmful chemical processes.

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Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells

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Sandia researchers have come up with a way to make titanium-dioxide nanoparticles, which have a variety of uses in everything from solar cells to LEDs. Titanium-dioxide nanoparticles show great promise, but industry has largely shunned them in the past because they’ve been difficult and expensive to make.

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Trapping Light: A Long Lifetime in a Very Small Place

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Physicists at the University of Rochester have created a silicon nanocavity that allows light to be trapped longer than in other similarly-sized optical cavities. An innovative design approach, which mimics evolutionary biology, allowed them to achieve a 10-fold improvement on the performance of previous nanocavities.

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DNA-Linked Nanoparticles Form Switchable "Thin Films" on a Liquid Surface

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Scientists have used DNA-linked nanoparticles to form a single-particle-thick layer on a liquid surface where the properties of the layer can be easily switched. Understanding the assembly of such nanostructured thin films provides a possible pathway to adjustable filters, surfaces with variable mechanical response, or even new ways to deliver genes for biomedical applications.

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Improvements in MRIs, Passenger Screening, Other Image-Detection Applications on the Horizon

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Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

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Nano-Platform Ready: NYU, University of Melbourne Scientists Use DNA Origami to Create 2D Structures

Scientists at New York University and the University of Melbourne have developed a method using DNA origami to turn one-dimensional nano materials into two dimensions. Their breakthrough offers the potential to enhance fiber optics and electronic devices by reducing their size and increasing their speed.

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