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Medicine

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Virus, Virology, Building Materials, Construction, Nanomedicine, Nanotechnology, Edward H. Egelman, Peter M. Kasson, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, UVA School of Medicine, Science, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, Yellowstone, Yellowstone National Park, Acid, Strange, David Prangishvili , Pasteur Institute, Mo

Indestructible Virus Yields Secret to Creating Incredibly Durable Materials

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It lives in boiling acid that dissolves flesh and bone. Now scientists have unlocked the secrets of the indestructible virus, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.

Medicine

Science

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quantitative biology, digital assays, assay design, data partitioning, nanotechnology, cancer, medicine, Drug Discovery And Development

Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Quantitative Biology and Medicine

Ten new reviews and original research reports that illustrate how the progression of research assays from qualitative outputs toward increasingly sensitive quantitative outputs is transforming life sciences and biomedical research and diagnostics by improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to detect and quantify increasingly complex assays.

Science

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Nanomagnets, skyrmion, Information Storage, topological, electron pulses, Alexander F. Schäffer, Hermann A. Durr, Jamal Berakdar, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Applied Physics Letters

Pulses of Electrons Manipulate Nanomagnets and Store Information

Skyrmions are a kind of nanomagnet, comprised of a spin-correlated ensemble of electrons acting as a topological magnet on certain microscopic surfaces. The precise properties, like spin orientation, of such nanomagnets can store information. But how might you go about moving or manipulating these nanomagnets at will to store the data you want? New research demonstrates such read/write ability using bursts of electrons, encoding topological energy structures robustly enough for potential data storage applications. The researchers report their work this week in Applied Physics Letters.

Science

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3-D printing, Carbon Nanotube

Novel 3-D Printing Process Strengthens Parts by 275 Percent

Brandon Sweeney and his advisor Dr. Micah Green discovered a way to make 3-D printed parts stronger and immediately useful in real-world applications. Sweeney and Green applied the traditional welding concepts to bond the submillimeter layers in a 3-D printed part together, while in a microwave.

Science

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AI, Artificial Intelligence, vr, Virtual Reality, Nanotechnology, San Diego Comic-Con, Comic-Con

Engineering Professors and Graduate Students Talk Nanotechnology and AI at San Diego Comic-Con

Science

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High-Energy Shock Waves, Plasma Behavior, Algae Production, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

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self-assemble , self-assembly, Nanoparticles, Nanotechnology, University Of Michigan, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

No Assembly Required: Nanoparticles That Put Themselves Together

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Scientists may be able to use self-assembly to design new materials with custom characteristics. Understanding self-assembly is particularly important for working with nanoparticles. Scientists supported by the Department of Energy are investigating two major methods of self-assembly. They are looking into both particles that assemble on their own as well as “nano-Velcro” that can pull together particles that wouldn’t otherwise connect on their own.

Science

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Zeolite, Argon, Nanoscience, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectrometry, Molecular Sieve, Nanopores, Confinement, two-dimensional materials, Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Science

Studying Argon Gas Trapped in Two-Dimensional Array of Tiny "Cages"

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For the first time, scientists have trapped a noble gas in a two-dimensional porous structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable detailed studies of individual gas atoms in confinement—research that could inform the design of new materials for gas separation and nuclear waste remediation.

Science

Business

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Wearable Tech, Concrete Life, Speeding up the Catalysts, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Science

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Researchers Revolutionize Vital Conservation Tool with Use of Gold Nanotechnology and Lasers

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In a new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) provide the first-ever reproducible evidence for the successful cryopreservation of zebrafish embryos. The study uses new gold nanotechnology and lasers to warm the embryo—the stumbling block in previous studies. The results have profound implications for human health, wildlife conservation, and aquaculture.







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