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Science

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A Novel Way to Power Greener Homes, A New Path in Battle Against Mosquito-Borne Illness, A Better Hydrogen Fuel Option for Vehicles, and More in the DOE Science News Source

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Medicine

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3-D printing, bone implant, nanotechnnology, Pedatrics, Biomaterial, Regeneration

Promising Biomaterial to Build Better Bones with 3-D Printing

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A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. This hyperelastic “bone” material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children. Antibiotics also can be incorporated into the ink to reduce infection. The printed biomaterial’s many unique properties set it apart from current bone repair materials.

Medicine

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Cornell University, Cancer, Cancer Treatment, Nanoparticles, Tumor, Weill Cornell Medical College

Nanoparticle Creates ‘Wave of Destruction’ in Cancer Cells

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Nanoparticles known as Cornell dots, or C dots, have shown great promise as a therapeutic tool in the detection and treatment of cancer. Now, the ultrasmall particles have shown they can do something even better: kill cancer cells without attaching a cytotoxic drug.

Science

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Nanotech, nanotechnnology, diapers, Cellulose, Electrospinning

Nanotech Could Give Us Safer, Greener Diapers and Sanitary Products

A new material made of tiny nanofibers could replace potentially harmful materials found in diapers and sanitary products, according to new research published in Applied Materials Today.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Memristor, bioelectronics, Neuroscience, Neuroprosthetics

‘Missing Link’ Found in the Development of Bioelectronic Medicines

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New research, led by the University of Southampton, has demonstrated that a nanoscale device, called a memristor, could be the ‘missing link’ in the development of implants that use electrical signals from the brain to help treat medical conditions.

Science

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World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector, What to Expect From the Coming Quantum Era and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

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Science

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Nanotechnology, Artificial Muscles, Carbon Nanotube, intelligent textiles, Material Science

UT Dallas Scientists Put a New Twist on Artificial Muscles

In recent years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and colleagues at the University of Wollongong in Australia have put a high-tech twist on the ancient art of fiber spinning, using modern materials to create ultra-strong, powerful, shape-shifting yarns.

Science

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Superhydrophobic, Coating, Glass Display, Smartphones, samsung, Dirt repellent, Water Repellent, Antireflective, Nanomaterials, Materials Science

Samsung Licenses ORNL Transparent Superhydrophobic Glass Coatings for Electronic Devices

Samsung Electronics has exclusively licensed optically clear superhydrophobic film technology from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory to improve the performance of glass displays on smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices.

Science

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Energy, Solar Cells, cadmium telluride, Nanoscience

Crystalline Fault Lines Provide Pathway for Solar Cell Current

A team of scientists studying solar cells made from cadmium telluride, a promising alternative to silicon, has discovered that microscopic "fault lines" within and between crystals of the material act as conductive pathways that ease the flow of electric current. This research-conducted at the University of Connecticut and the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, and described in the journal Nature Energy-may help explain how a common processing technique turns cadmium telluride into an excellent material for transforming sunlight into electricity, and suggests a strategy for engineering more efficient solar devices that surpass the performance of silicon.

Science

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Quantum, Materials Science, Electronics, Electron, Dirac, semimetal, Nanotech, Nanoscience, Semiconductor, Superconductor, topological, Electrons

Scientists Find Twisting 3-D Raceway for Electrons in Nanoscale Crystal Slices

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Researchers observed, for the first time, an exotic 3-D racetrack for electrons in ultrathin slices of a crystal they made at Berkeley Lab.

Medicine

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drug deliver, Tumor, Cancer, magnetic bacteria

Swarms of Magnetic Bacteria Could Be Used to Deliver Drugs to Tumors

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Researchers have recently shown that magnetic bacteria are a promising vehicle for more efficiently delivering tumor-fighting drugs.

Science

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Physical Science, Engineering, Materials Science, Center For Nanoscale Materials

Argonne Appoints New Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory announced today the appointment of Jeffrey L. Binder to the position of Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security (EGS).

Science

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Catalysis, Chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, Carbon dioxide conversion, Spectroscopy, nanotechnnology

Making Catalysts Smarter

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The industrial catalysts of the future won’t just speed up reactions, they’ll control how chemical processes work and determine how much of a particular product is made.

Science

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Boise State University, Yanliang Zhang, Tony Varghese, Courtney Hollar, Joseph Richardson, Nicholas Kempf, Chao Han, Pansindu Gamarachchi, David Estrada, Rutvik J. Mehta, Thermoelectric

Boise State Research Explores Thermoelectric Screen Printing

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Flexible thermoelectric devices are especially attractive for waste heat recovery along contoured surfaces and for energy harvesting applications to power sensors, biomedical devices and wearable electronics – an area experiencing exponential growth. However, obtaining low-cost, flexible and efficient thermoelectric materials is extremely difficult due to many materials and manufacturing challenges.

Medicine

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Gynecologic Cancer, saltzman, Ovarian, Uterine, Nanoparticles, Targeted Therapy, YALE

Fighting Cancer with Sticky Nanoparticles

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A team of researchers at Yale found that a treatment using bioadhesive nanoparticles loaded with a potent chemotherapy drug proved more effective and less toxic than conventional treatments for gynecological cancer.

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Nanoscale Tetrapods Could Provide Early Warning of a Material’s Failure

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Light-emitting, four-armed nanocrystals could someday form the basis of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that portend failure, thanks to recent research by scientists from Berkeley Lab.

Science

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Materials Science, Nanoscience, Semiconductors, materials simulation & theory, Surface & interface studies, Thin Films

Diamond Proves Useful Material for Growing Graphene

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A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

Medicine

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Nanoparticle Drug Cocktail Could Help Treat Lethal Cancers

A group of scientists from the University of Chicago has developed an ingenious way to spur checkpoint blockade cancer immunotherapy into more potent action. The therapy offers the hope of an effective treatment for intractable metastatic cancers including those of the colon and lung.

Science

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Large Protein Nanocages Could Improve Drug Design and Delivery

Using novel computational and biochemical approaches, HHMI scientists have designed and built from scratch 10 large protein icosahedra that are similar to viral capsids that carry viral DNA.

Science

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Nanorods, Nanotechnology, Nanocrystals, block copolymer

Uniform “Hairy” Nanorods Have Potential Energy, Biomedical Applications

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Materials scientists have developed a new strategy for crafting one-dimensional nanorods from a wide range of precursor materials. Based on a cellulose backbone, the system relies on the growth of block copolymer “arms” that help create a compartment to serve as a nanometer-scale chemical reactor.







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