Feature Channels

Emergency Medicine

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

JAMA Internal Medicine Article Discusses New American Board of Addiction Medicine

ABAMlogo_1.jpg

In a new JAMA Internal Medicine article, three leading addiction experts document the need for an addiction medicine specialty, trace the history of physicians specializing in addiction treatment, and discuss current efforts by the American Board of Addiction Medicine and The ABAM Foundation to train and certify physicians, and to become recognized and accredited within the larger medical community.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

To Admit or Not to Admit: Huge Variation in Hospitalizations From Emergency Room Suggests Opportunity to Save Billions

Doctors at one hospital may be as much as six times as likely to admit an emergency patient with a common non-life-threatening diagnosis to the hospital, compared with doctors at another hospital treating an identical patient. The variation may cost an extra $5 billion dollars a year.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Penn Study Shows Better Outcomes for Sepsis Patients Treated in Hospitals with Higher Volume of Cases

Patients with sepsis, one of the most time-sensitive and hard-to-detect illnesses in medicine, are more likely to survive the life-threatening condition when treated at a hospital that sees a higher volume of sepsis cases. New research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shows a clear relationship between hospitals that treat the most cases of severe sepsis and lower rates of inpatient deaths among those patients. The study is published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Real Tremors, or Drug-Seeking Patient? New App Can Tell

New iPod smart phone app developed by University of Toronto measures frequency of tremors in alcoholics.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Intervention Needed for Survivors of Childhood Burns

Adults who have been hospitalized for a burn as a child experience higher than usual rates of depression and suicidal thoughts, according to new research at the University of Adelaide.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

State Medical Marijuana Laws Linked to Lower Prescription Overdose Deaths

In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Continuing Ebola Outbreak Highlights Need for Disaster Medicine Planning

JoshuaMugele.jpg

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

The Key to Saving Lives, Hands-Only CPR

EdStapleton.JPG

Cardiac arrest – an electrical malfunction in the heart that causes an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and disrupts the flow of blood to the brain, lungs and other organs - is a leading cause of death. Each year, over 420,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States. When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately getting CPR from someone nearby.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Proteins Critical to Wound Healing Identified

RetinalVasculatureImage_primary.jpg

Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don’t become injured. If they do, their wounds don’t heal properly, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating diseases involving abnormal blood vessel growth, such as the impaired wound healing often seen in diabetes and the loss of vision caused by macular degeneration.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Many Older Emergency Department Patients Are Malnourished

platts-mills.jpg

More than half of emergency department patients age 65 and older who were seen at UNC Hospitals during an 8-week period were either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. In addition, more than half of the malnourished patients had not previously been diagnosed, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

View | Comment