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The George Washington University Launches Podcast Series to Promote Innovation in Health Care

The George Washington University Office for Clinical Practice Innovation launched a podcast series to generate conversation about more efficient, cost-effective health care delivery.

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Emergency Department Resource Use by Supervised Residents vs. Attending Physicians Alone

In a sample of U.S. emergency departments, compared to attending physicians alone, supervised visits (involving both resident and attending physicians) were associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission and use of advanced imaging and with longer emergency department stays, according to a study in the December 10 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on medical education.

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New Study Finds a Child Treated in a U.S. Emergency Department Every 3 minutes for a Toy-Related Injury

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have found that an estimated 3,278,073 children were treated in United States emergency departments from 1990 through 2011 for a toy-related injury.

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Eighty Percent of Kidney Dialysis Patients Unprepared for Natural Disaster or Emergency

Eighty percent of kidney dialysis patients surveyed were not adequately prepared in the event of an emergency or natural disaster that shut down their dialysis center. But after receiving individualized education from a multidisciplinary team , 78 percent of these patients had become adequately prepared, according to a study.

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Paradox Lost: Speedier Heart Attack Treatment Does Save More Lives After All, Study Suggests

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A national effort to shave minutes off emergency heart attack treatment time has increased the chance that each patient will survive. But yet the survival rate for all patients put together hasn’t budged. It seems like a paradox. But the paradox vanishes with more detailed analysis of exactly who has been getting this treatment.

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Testing of ER Patients for Heart Attack in Absence of Symptoms Widespread

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Emergency rooms are testing many patients for markers of acute coronary syndrome who show no signs of having suffered a heart attack, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.

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Is Violent Injury a Chronic Disease? U-M Study Suggests So, and May Aid Efforts to Stop the Cycle

Teens and young adults who get seriously injured in an assault are nearly twice as likely as their peers to end up back in the emergency room for a violent injury within the next two years, a new University of Michigan study finds. The researchers call this repeating pattern of violent injury a reoccurring disease.

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Readmission Rates Above Average for Survivors of Septic Shock

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PHILADELPHIA –A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life. Penn Medicine researchers have now shown that while most patients now survive a hospital stay for septic shock, 23 percent will return to the hospital within 30 days, many with another life-threatening condition -- a rate substantially higher than the normal readmission rate at a large academic medical center. The findings are published in the new issue of Critical Care Medicine.

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Life in Emergistan—New Ebook from the Pages of Emergency Medicine News

If you're a doctor, nurse, or other healthcare professional accustomed to the long hours and hectic pace of the emergency department, you have your stories to tell. Edwin Leap, MD, award-winning columnist for Emergency Medicine News, tells his stories in his new ebook, Life in Emergistan. Emergency Medicine News is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Over-Organizing Repair Cells Set the Stage for Fibrosis

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The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology.

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