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Marine Science

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Science

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Where the Rains Come From, Glowing Crystals Can Detect Contaminated Drinking Water, 'Polarons' and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

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Marine Life, Tracking, acoustic monitoring, autonomous recorder, microphones, Vocalizations, Glider, Selen Fregosi, Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

"Mic Check" for Marine Mammals

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Hearing is a vital sense for marine mammals who use it to forage, communicate and navigate. Many of these mammals produce specific vocalizations that can be used to identify the species and track their locations via acoustic monitoring. Traditionally, scientists have used underwater microphones to listen for marine mammals, either on the seafloor or towed behind a boat. But now scientists can use autonomous underwater vehicles, gliders and floats specially equipped with hydrophones, to listen to marine mammals in ways impossible until now.

Science

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Chaos, Information, collective dynamics

Synchronized Swimming: How Startled Fish Shoals Effectively Evade Danger

As panic spreads, an entire shoal (collective) of fish responds to an incoming threat in a matter of seconds, seemingly as a single body, to change course and evade a threatening predator. Within those few seconds, the panic-infused information – more technically known as the startle response – spreads through the collective, warning fish within the group that would otherwise have no way to detect such a threat. The ways in which this information spreads and the role played by position dynamics may help us better plan for emergencies.

Science

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New South Pole Solar Observatory in Antarctica, Impact of Wind Energy on Wildlife, A Better Way to Prepare for Devastating Storms, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

Science

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University of Vienna, Florian Raible, Mature female bristleworm, Vienna Biocenter , marine bristle worm, Growth, Reproduction, 60-year-old riddle, Molecule, eLife

A Molecular Switch Between Life, Sex and Death

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"Till death do us part" – for marine bristle worms, these words are invariably true: Shortly after mating, the parent worms die, leaving thousands of newly fertilized eggs to develop in the water. This extreme all-or-nothing mode of reproduction demonstrates a general principle: Animals need to decide if they invest their available energy stores either in growth or in reproduction. Researchers around Florian Raible at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna were now able to solve a 60-year-old riddle and determine the molecule that orchestrates this decision in marine bristle worms. Their results are published in the journal eLife.

Science

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Algae blooms, domoic acid, Shellfish Contaminants

Toxic ‘Marine Snow’ Can Sink Quickly, Persist at Ocean Depths

A specific neurotoxin can persist and accumulate in “marine snow” formed by the algae Pseudo-nitzschia, and this marine snow can reach significant depths quickly.

Science

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Great Barrier Reef, Coral Bleaching, Coral, Ocean Health, Marine Diseases

Marine Disease Likely to Follow Great Barrier Reef Coral Bleaching

Science

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Earth Science, Climate Change, Glacier, Antarctica, rift, Calving, Iceberg

West Antarctic Ice Shelf Breaking Up From the Inside Out

A key glacier in Antarctica is breaking apart from the inside out, suggesting that the ocean is weakening ice on the edges of the continent.

Science

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West Antarctica, Pine Island Glacier, Ice thinning, Ice retreat, Global Warming, Rising Sea Levels, Climate Change

Thinning and Retreat of West Antarctic Glacier Began in 1940s

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New research by an international team shows that the present thinning and retreat of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica is part of a climatically forced trend that was triggered in the 1940s.

Medicine

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Ocean, Climate Change, global mean surface temperature, NASA, NOAA, NACR, heat, Ice Melt, ocean temperatures

Oceans Act as A "Heat Sink"

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Study by three universities, NASA, NOAA and NCAR, points to the prominent role global ocean played in absorbing extra heat from the atmosphere by acting as a “heat sink” as an explanation for the observed decrease in a key indicator of climate change.

Science

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Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, Nova Southeastern University, Alex Soloviev, Ph.D., Magnetics, Oceanography

$3 Million Grant Allows NSU Students to Participate in Electromagnetic Observatory in the Straits of Florida

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Thanks to NAVAIR and the U.S. Navy, the next generation of specialists in science, math and technology are being trained right here at Nova Southeastern University (NSU.)

Science

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Ocean Acidification Study Offers Warnings for Marine Life, Habitats

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Acidification of the world’s oceans could drive a cascading loss of biodiversity in some marine habitats, according to research published today in Nature Climate Change.

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Gulf of Mexico Alliance Awards First Gulf Star Regional Projects

The Gulf of Mexico Alliance is announcing the award of 19 projects through its new Gulf Star Program.

Science

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Enviroment, Climate Change, Energy, Sustainability, Food

Marine Microalgae, a New Sustainable Food and Fuel Source

Taken from the bottom of the marine food chain, microalgae may soon become a top-tier contender to combat global warming, climate change and food insecurity.

Science

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Microfluidic Device, surface sound waves, Materials Science

Using Sound Waves to Move Liquids at the Nano Scale

A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

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Corals Survived Caribbean Climate Change

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Half of all coral species in the Caribbean went extinct between 1 and 2 million years ago, probably due to drastic environmental changes. Which ones survived? Scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) think one group of survivors, corals in the genus Orbicella, will continue to adapt to future climate changes because of their high genetic diversity.

Science

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Climate Change, Global Warming, melting ice caps, Canada, arctic whales, Arctic, Whales, Migration, Sea Ice, Native peoples, Alaska

Study Reveals Impacts of Climate Warming and Declining Sea Ice on Arctic Whale Migration

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Declines in the Arctic sea ice are arguably the most dramatic evidence of the effects of current climate warming on ocean systems. While sea ice is perhaps the most defining habitat feature of Arctic whales, the relationship between Arctic whales and sea ice is still largely a mystery, and there is increasing concern over how these species will adapt to climate related changes in sea ice.

Science

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Climate Change Already Dramatically Disrupting All Elements of Nature, Three New Bird Species Discovered in Africa, The Fastest Flyer in the Animal Kingdom, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on Animals in the Wildlife News Source

Science

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Optics, Optical Society, Lasers

IBO Matthews Elected Fellow of Optical Society

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist Manyalibo (Ibo) Matthews has been elected as a fellow of the Optical Society for his “outstanding contributions and sustained leadership in the field of high power laser-induced damage science, laser-material interactions and processing, and vibrational spectroscopy-based materials characterization.”

Science

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Mislabeled Seafood May Be More Sustainable, New Study Finds

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A University of Washington study is the first to broadly examine the ecological and financial impacts of seafood mislabeling. The paper, published online Nov. 2 in Conservation Letters, finds that in most cases, mislabeling actually leads people to eat more sustainably, because the substituted fish is often more plentiful and of a better conservation status than the fish on the label.







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