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UF/IFAS Research Findings Shed Light on Seagrass Needs

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Seagrass beds, which provide home and food for fish, manatees, sea turtles and other animals, find themselves in peril. A new UF/IFAS study shows how much sunlight is needed to keep the seagrass healthy.

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Declining Catch Rates in Caribbean Nicaragua Green Turtle Fishery May Be Result of Overfishing

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A 20-year assessment of Nicaragua’s legal, artisanal green sea turtle fishery has uncovered a stark reality: greatly reduced overall catch rates of turtles in what may have become an unsustainable take, according to conservation scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Florida.

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China’s Ocean Energy Push Comes with a High Price

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Environmental Threats, Solutions for Sea Turtles, Other Topics to Be Discussed at International Meeting in New Orleans

— Sea turtles—a group of seven species thought to have evolved more than 200 million years ago—are currently under significant stress, especially in the Gulf of Mexico, primarily as a result of human negligence and industrialization. A group of more than 600 scientists, conservationists, students and others will meet in New Orleans April 10-17 to discuss this and a wide range of other topics at the 34th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation, the main meeting of the International Sea Turtle Society

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Researcher Unravels Mystery of Sea Turtles’ ‘Lost Years’

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Jeanette Wyneken, Ph.D., associate professor of biological science at Florida Atlantic University, and Kate Mansfield, Ph.D., a co-investigator at the University of Central Florida, are the first to successfully track neonate sea turtles in the Atlantic Ocean waters during what had previously been called their “lost years.” Findings from the study appear today in the journal Proceeding of the Royal Society B.

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New Fins Evolve Repeatedly in Teleost Fishes

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A new study analyzing the origins of the adipose fin, thought by some to be vestigial, finds that these fins arose repeatedly and independently in multiple species—a striking example of convergent evolution. Adipose fins also appear to have repeatedly and independently evolved skeleton, offering a glimpse into the evolution of vertebrate appendages.

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UC San Diego Takes Top Two Positions in National Rankings for Biofuel Research

A new report issued by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) ranked programs at UC San Diego as the two best in the country for algal biofuels research, including Scripps Institution of Oceanography as top in the nation.

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Global Warming Felt to Deepest Reaches of Ocean

Study shows the 1970s polynya within the Antarctic sea ice pack of the Weddell Sea may have been the last gasp of what was previously a more common feature of the Southern Ocean, and which is now suppressed due to the effects of climate change on ocean salinity.

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Antarctic Circumpolar Current Carries 20 Percent More Water Than Previous Estimates

By analyzing four years of continuous measurements of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at Drake Passage, the narrowest point in the Southern Ocean, three University of Rhode Island oceanographers have concluded that the current carries 20 percent more water than previous estimates. They also found that the current remains strong all the way to the seafloor.

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Ambitious New Pollution Targets Needed to Protect Lake Erie From Massive 'Dead Zone'

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Reducing the size of the Lake Erie "dead zone" to acceptable levels will require cutting nutrient pollution nearly in half in coming decades, at a time when climate change is expected to make such reductions more difficult.

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