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Tiger, Indonesia, World Heritage Site , UNESCO World Heritage Site

Critically Endangered Sumatran Tigers On Path To Recovery in ‘In Danger’ UNESCO World Heritage Site

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A new scientific publication from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and the Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park Authority looks at the effectiveness of the park’s protection zone and finds that the density of Sumatran tigers has increased despite the continued threat of living in an ‘In Danger’ World Heritage Site.

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Killer Pollution, Predicting Droughts, Salmon Spawning, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

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Fossil, Melanin, Protein, Sea Turtle, evoluion

Keratin, Pigment, Proteins from 54 Million-Year-Old Sea Turtle Show Survival Trait Evolution

Researchers have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54 million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago.

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, James Nifong, Alligators, Sharks, Wildlife, Predator, predatation

Bite on This: Kansas State University Researcher Finds Alligators Eat Sharks

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MANHATTAN, KANSAS — Jaws, beware! Alligators may be coming for you. While the sharks may not actually be as big as the fictional Jaws, James Nifong, postdoctoral researcher with the Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Kansas State University, and Russell Lowers, wildlife biologist with Integrated Mission Support Services at Kennedy Space Center, published a study in Southeastern Naturalist documenting that American alligators on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are eating small sharks and stingrays.

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Marine, Pollutants, Sewage, Antidepressant, Aquatic Ecology

Cocktail Tests on Toxic Waste Called For

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Surprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals – from fungicides to antidepressants – can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results.

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Year-to-Year Volatility of Penguin Population Requires New Approaches to Track Marine Health

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A study using data on Adélie penguin populations over the last 35 years has found that only a small fraction of year-to-year changes in Adélie penguin populations can be attributed to measureable factors such as changes in sea ice.

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Joint Genome Institute, JGI, Algae, Alga, red algae, Photosynthesis, Lipids, porphyra umbilicalis, Genome, Genetics, genomic analysis, genomic data, Marine Science, Marine Sciences, marine algae, PNAS, Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences, University of Maine, Intertidal,

A Complex Little Alga that Lives by the Sea

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The genetic material of Porphyra umbilicalis reveals the mechanisms by which it thrives in the stressful intertidal zone at the edge of the ocean.

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Hammerhead Sharks, Sharks, Biology, Swimming Performance, Kinematics, Anatomy, Research, Conservation, Bioinspired Engineering, Electroreception, Olfaction, shark conservation, Shark species

Size Doesn’t Matter – At Least for Hammerheads and Swimming Performance

Different head shapes and different body sizes of hammerhead sharks should result in differences in their swimming performance right? Researchers from FAU have conducted the first study to examine the whole body shape and swimming kinematics of two closely related yet very different hammerhead sharks, with some unexpected results.

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fish, Conservation, Clinch dace, Wildlife, rare

Study Highlights Conservation Needs of Fish Species Recently Discovered in Southwest Virginia

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Currently, the Clinch dace is in the highest tier of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ Tiers of Imperilment for all wildlife species found in the state. According to Mike Pinder, an aquatic biologist with the agency, that means that conservation efforts are vital.

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ocean observing, Hurricane, Prediction, Weather, GCOOS, Gulf Of Mexico, Harvey, Irma, lsu, Texas A&M, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics, Rosenstiel School, University Of Miami, IOOS

Helping Communities Weather the Storms

GCOOS collects data from more than 2,000 ocean sensors that play a critical role in hurricane forecasting and ensures that the information is timely, reliable, accurate and -- above all -- available to those working to understand ocean systems and subsequently provide better forecast data to save lives and protect coastal economies during hurricanes.







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