Feature Channels:

Oceanography/Marine Biology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Streamlining Accelerated Computing, New Possibilities for Cancer Treatment, New Way to Display the 3-D Structure of Molecules, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

Channels:

Earth Science, marine and freshwater biology, Oceanography

Darwin's Theory About 'Impassable' Marine Barrier Holds True for Coral Larvae in the Pacific

122447_web.jpg

MIAMI--An international team of scientists used a state-of-the-art computer model, a high-powered supercomputer, and five billion 'virtual' coral larvae to test Charles Darwin's 1880 hypothesis that marine species cannot cross the Eastern Pacific's "impassable" marine barrier. The team, which included University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Associate Professor Claire Paris, found that Darwin's theory still hold true today even under extreme El Niño conditions known to speed up ocean currents.

Science

Channels:

Atmospheric Science, Ecology and Environment, Climate Change, Fisheries and aquaculture, Marine Freshwater Biology

Rising Temperatures Could Accelerate Radiation Induced DNA Effects in Marine Mussels

Increased sea temperatures could dramatically enhance and accelerate radiation-induced DNA effects in marine invertebrates, a new study suggests.

Science

Channels:

saccharides, Geophysical Research Letters, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Montana State University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, sea spray aerosols, Organic Molecules, Clouds, Aerosols, Fatty Acid, Environmental Research, Environmental Science, Climate Science, earth systems science, Atmospheric & climate research, Atmospheric Aerosols, atmosph

Sugar Hitches a Ride on Organic Sea Spray

Burrows-oceanfilms-july2016-520.jpg

Hitching a ride on fatty molecules, a "sticky" strategy shields sugary molecules from their soluble nature, and may explain the discrepancies between models and actual measurements of sea spray aerosol composition.

Science

Channels:

Genetics, Biology

From Sci Fi to Reality: Unlocking the Secret to Growing New Limbs

Axolotl.jpg

Many lower organisms retain the miraculous ability to regenerate form and function of almost any tissue after injury. Humans share many of our genes with these organisms, but our capacity for regeneration is limited. Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, are studying the genetics of these organisms to find out how regenerative mechanisms might be activated in humans.

Science

Channels:

atmosphere science, Climate Change, Earth Science, Oceanography

The Amount of Sea Level Rise in the Pacific Ocean Can Be Used to Estimate Future Global Surface Temperatures

The amount of sea level rise in the Pacific Ocean can be used to estimate future global surface temperatures, according to a new report led by University of Arizona geoscientists.

Science

Channels:

URI Grad Student Makes Discovery About Sensory System of Deep-Sea Fish

Denver native says dragonfish have highly evolved system for detecting water flows

Science

Channels:

Ocean, Tiger Sharks, marine and freshwater biology

Study Shows Tiger Sharks Opt for Scavenging on Dead and Dying Sea Turtles as a Feeding Strategy

MIAMI—An international team that includes University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found behavioral evidence that tiger sharks prefer to opportunistically scavenge on dead or weakened green turtles rather than actively hunting healthy individuals despite more opportunities to do so. The study, conducted off the coast of Australia during the turtle nesting season, also found the behavior of healthy green turtles suggests that they do not perceive tiger sharks as a major threat during nesting season.

Science

Channels:

Biology, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Ecology and Environment, marine and freshwater biology, Fisheries and aquaculture, Earth Science

Mussel Flexing: Bivalve Save Drought-Stricken Marshes, Research Finds

As coastal ecosystems feel the heat of climate change worldwide, new research shows the humble mussel and marsh grass form an intimate interaction known as mutualism that benefits both partner species and may be critical to helping these ecosystems bounce back from extreme climatic events such as drought.

Science

Channels:

Marine, Deep Sea, Cancer, pancreatice cancer , Medicine, Natural Compounds, Tumor, sea-sponge, metastic cancer

Natural Compound From a Deep-Water Marine Sponge Found to Reduce Pancreatic Tumor Size

FAUHarborBranchLeiodermatium.jpg

A deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale’s coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound.

Science

Channels:

New Techniques Boost Understanding of How Fish Fins Became Fingers

Mousedigitsfishfinrays.jpg

The cells that make fin rays in fish play a central role in forming the fingers and toes of four-legged creatures, one of the great transformations required for the descendants of fish to become creatures that walk on land.

Science

Channels:

University of Washington, Coral Reef, Coral Reefs, coral reef conservation, Coral Ecosystems, Coral Reef Fish, Coral Ecology, Fish Ecology, Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Bahamas

Big Fish — and Their Pee — Are Key Parts of Coral Reef Ecosystems

Highhat.jpg

Large, carnivorous fish excrete almost half of the key nutrients, phosphorus and nitrogen, that are essential for the survival of coral reefs.

Science

Channels:

Nautilus, Conservation, Evolution, Speciation, Cites

UW Research Backs Up Ongoing Efforts to Protect the Enigmatic Nautilus

Ward_Nautilus_Vanuatu.png

University of Washington biologist Peter Ward's body of research has helped policymakers recognize the impact nautiluses have on ocean ecosystems, as well as how they can — and cannot — replenish their numbers in the face of unrestricted, unregulated fishing. At a CITES meeting in September, Ward and his team hope nautiluses will get much-needed protections from trade and harvesting.

Science

Channels:

Lobster Season

Lobster season has started in Florida

Science

Channels:

Biology, Cell Biology, marine and freshwater biology, Zoology, veterinary science

Discovery of a Unique Subcellular Structure Determining the Orientation of Cell Division

121812_web.jpg

Cell division is a fundamental process of life, producing two cells from one single cell at each cell division. During animal development, a fertilized egg divides many times, increasing the number of cells, which are precisely organized within the animal's body. How many times a cell undergoes cell division and how the two daughter cells are positioned after the division can be critical for shaping the animal. Although the machinery essential for cell division is well characterized and evolutionarily conserved, it remains unknown in most animals how a cell division can become oriented relative to the animal's body axis. The work by Negishi et al., published recently in the electronic journal eLife, has revealed that in the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) embryo, the orientation of the cell division machinery in epithelial cells is controlled by a unique cell membrane structure, which we call an "invagination".

Science

Channels:

archealogy, Ecology and Environment, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Paleontology

Unearthed: The Cannibal Sharks of a Forgotten Age

121643_web.jpg

Dublin, Ireland, Thursday 11th August, 2016 - Scientists have discovered macabre fossil evidence suggesting that 300 million-year-old sharks ate their own young, as fossil poop of adult Orthacanthus sharks contained the tiny teeth of juveniles. These fearsome marine predators used protected coastal lagoons to rear their babies, but it seems they also resorted to cannibalising them when other food sources became scarce.

Science

Channels:

Climate Change, atmosphere science, Fisheries and aquaculture, marine and freshwater biology, pollution and remediation, temperature dependent phenomena

With Droughts and Downpours, Climate Change Feeds Chesapeake Bay Algal Blooms

Nitrogen-rich agricultural runoff into the Chesapeake Bay presents an ongoing environmental and economic concern for the bay's massive watershed. Pollution from fertilizer application feeds algal blooms that poison humans and marine life, and devastate fisheries.

Science

Channels:

Biodiversity, Biology, Evolution, marine and freshwater biology, Zoology, veterinary science

Unraveling the Jaw-Dropping Goblin Shark

121622_web.jpg

A research team, led by Emeritus Professor Kazuhiro Nakaya of Japan's Hokkaido University, analyzed world-first footage captured by public broadcaster NHK in which two goblin sharks separately captured prey on a total of five occasions. The research has unraveled a century-old mystery surrounding how the deep-sea shark utilizes its protruding jaws, among other factors, to feed itself.

Science

Channels:

wild blue mussels, warming oceans, Climate Change

Why Are New England’s Wild Blue Mussels Disappearing?

BlueMussel_MtDesertIs_SorteGCB.jpg

The Gulf of Maine coastline, historically home to one of the richest shellfish populations in the U.S., is undergoing a dramatic change, with once-flourishing wild blue mussels all but disappearing, according to a study led by University of California, Irvine ecologists.

Science

Channels:

FSU’s Center for Advanced Power Systems Nets $35M Naval Award

Florida State University’s Center for Advanced Power Systems has been awarded a five-year $35 million grant by the U.S. Navy’s Office of Naval Research to bring together researchers to spur innovation and advance the Navy’s efforts to build an all-electric ship.







Chat now!