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Organism Responsible for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning May Affect Fisheries

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The toxic dinoflagellate, Alexandrium fundyense, is a photosynthetic plankton--a microscopic organism floating in the ocean, unable to swim against a current. New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa (UHM) School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) suggests that ingestion of this dinoflagellate changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of a particular copepod--a small crustacean--in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species.

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Research Reveals That Sharks Have Individual Personalities

A new study indicates that sharks of the same species can have different personalities.

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Red Tide Forecasting in the Gulf of Mexico on Every Beach, Every Day? Soon There Will Be an App for That

A new three-year $1.1 million grant from NASA is helping several organizations fine-tune current red tide forecasts in the Gulf of Mexico with the goal of offering public health managers, coastal residents and visitors a forecast that better reflects coastal conditions on more localized scales.

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Saving Nemo: Bleaching Threatens Clownfish

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Clownfish became a household name over a decade ago when Disney released the movie “Finding Nemo.” The colorful fish are now at risk due to bleaching of their sea anemone homes in the Indo-Pacific, which has increased due to rising ocean temperatures. University of Delaware researcher Danielle Dixson has co-authored a paper demonstrating how vulnerable clownfish are to the increased frequency of bleaching events.

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A 100 Million-Year Partnership on the Brink of Extinction

A symbiotic relationship that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs is at risk of ending, as habitat loss and environmental change mean that a species of Australian crayfish and the tiny worms that depend on them are both at serious risk of extinction.

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Is Aging Inevitable? Not Necessarily for Sea Urchins

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Study shows that sea urchins defy aging, regardless of lifespan.

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Many Unknown Chemicals in the Baltic Sea

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The researchers examined data from research and monitoring reports from the years 2000-2012, to see what chemicals have been analysed in Baltic Sea fish.

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Rutgers Scientists Help Create World’s Largest Coral Gene Database

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Coral reefs – stunning, critical habitats for an enormous array of prized fish and other species – have survived five major extinction events over the last 250 million years. Now, an international team of scientists led by Rutgers faculty has conducted the world’s most comprehensive analysis of coral genes, focusing on how their evolution has allowed corals to interact with and adapt to the environment. A second study led by Rutgers researchers with colleagues at the University of Hawaii shows – for the first time – how stony corals create their hard skeletons, using proteins as key ingredients.

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The Future of Sonar in Semiheated Oceans

Light doesn’t travel very far underwater so the navy uses sound to transmit messages. The speed of underwater sound depends on a combination of temperature, salinity and pressure. Understanding sound speed is crucial for transmitting messages, detecting enemy submarines and avoiding marine animals. As climate change elevates temperatures, understanding underwater sound speed will become increasingly important.

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Mucus May Play Vital Role in Dolphin Echolocation

A dolphin chasing a tasty fish will produce a stream of rapid-fire echolocation clicks that help it track the speed, direction and distance to its prey. Now researchers have developed a model that could yield new insights into how the charismatic marine mammals make these clicks – and it turns out snot may play an important role. The researchers will present their model at the 171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America.

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How Much Can a Mode-2 Wave Move?

For the first time, two mathematicians at Canada’s University of Waterloo have created a 3-D simulation of the mass transport capabilities of mode-2 waves. Such models will help define how mode-2 waves can carry materials that are either beneficial (such as phytoplankton and other food sources) or detrimental (such as crude oil and other contaminants) between ecosystems. The simulation is described this week in Physics of Fluids.

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Reconnecting Stream Habitat

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Jumping up a 2-foot waterfall is an impossible task for small fish like minnows and shiners. Such an obstacle can inhibit their ability to feed and spawn upstream. But state and federal wildlife agencies may soon be able to install fish ladders on the downside side of culverts to prevent this from happening.

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New “Ugly” Deep-Sea Angler Fish Named One of Top 10 Discoveries of the Past Year

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New Species of Marine Life Named One of the Year's Best Discoveries

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Call to Minimise Drone Impact on Wildlife

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University of Adelaide environmental researchers have called for a ‘code of best practice’ in using unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) for wildlife monitoring and protection, and other biological field research.

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Squids on the Rise as Oceans Change

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Unlike the declining populations of many fish species, the number of cephalopods (octopus, cuttlefish and squid) has increased in the world’s oceans over the past 60 years, a University of Adelaide study has found.

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Lingcod Meet Rockfish: Catching One Improves Chances for the Other

In a new study, University of Washington researchers found that selectively fishing for lingcod in protected areas actually avoided hampering the recovery of other fish, including rockfish species listed as overfished.

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'Canaries' of the Ocean Highlight Threat to World's Ecosystems

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Fifty-nine finfish species have ‘disappeared’ from fishermen’s catches in the world’s most species rich and vulnerable marine region, new research has shown.

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Online Press Conference Tuesday: Presidential Pitch Posturing, a Tsunami Warning System, and the Role of Snot in Dolphin Echolocation

Researchers investigating the commonalities in pitch delivery by presidential candidates, the biological basis for dolphin echolocation, and an early warning system to detect tsunamis will describe their latest findings during a webcast press event on Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The event will be streamed live at 1:00 p.m., EDT, from the 171st meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), which takes place May 23-27 in Salt Lake City. Additionally, the webcast will be available for download 24 hours afterwards.

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Study Proves Removing Beach Debris Increases Sea Turtle Nests

Conventional wisdom says removing beach debris helps sea turtles nest; now, as sea-turtle nesting season gets underway, a new University of Florida study proves it.

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Top Stories 5-17-2016

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