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Science

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Reproduction, Eagles, Envirionmental biology

Scouting the Eagles: Proof That Protecting Nests Aids Reproduction

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Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a study published today (Jan. 9, 2018) in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Science

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Stress, PTSD, fracking, Wildlife Conservation, oil and gas drilling

Industrial Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress, Reproductive Problems in Birds

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A new study by CU Boulder researchers found that blue birds nesting near noisy oil and gas operations have hormonal changes similar to people with PTSD, smaller nestlings and fewer eggs that hatch

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Lake Michigan Waterfowl Botulism Deaths Linked to Warm Waters, Algae

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In a USGS program, volunteers tracked bird deaths along Lake Michigan from 2010 to 2013 to discover what conditions lead to large die-offs. The researchers found that warm waters and algae — both of which have become more frequent over the years — tended to precede bird deaths, likely because they promoted the growth of botulism toxin-producing bacteria.

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wind turbine

NMSU Professor Conducts Research on Golden Eagles Being Killed by Wind Turbines

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A New Mexico State University professor in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences is conducting research on golden eagles being killed by wind turbines and other human-related factors.

Science

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bats, Bats Disappearing, white-nose syndrome, Genomics, DNA, Northern Arizona University, NAU, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center, NWHC

Researchers Use Genomics to Determine Origins of Deadly White-Nose Syndrome

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NAU researcher Jeff Foster led the team of international scientists who tried to definitively answer several questions—where did this fungus come from? And more importantly, can a resistance be evolved?

Science

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Ecology, Forests, National Forests, Logging, spotted owl, Endangered Species, Birds, Forestry

Decades-Past Logging Still Threatens Spotted Owls in National Forests

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Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada’s national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species’ habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the journal Diversity and Distributions by University of Wisconsin–Madison ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to protect, have continued to experience population declines in the forests.

Science

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UW Bothel, University of Washington, Crows, Bird behavior, Animal Behavior, Acoustics

Rooftop Wiretap Aims to Learn What Crows Gossip About at Dusk

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An interdisciplinary team is using a covert sound-based approach, worthy of an avian CSI, to study the link between crows' calls and their behavior.

Science

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Animals, Cognition, Behavior, Animal intelligence, Evolution, Psychology

Pigeons Can Discriminate Both Space and Time

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Pigeons aren't so bird-brained after all. New research from the University of Iowa shows that pigeons can discriminate the abstract concepts of space and time, likely using a different region of the brain than humans and primates to do so. Results appear in the journal Current Biology.

Science

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Tulane Univeristy, Tulane, Ecology/Environment, Birds, Central America, Songbirds

Loss of Breeding Grounds Hits a Sad Note for Common Songbird

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A Tulane University researcher has found that a decline in the number of wood thrushes is probably due to deforestation in Central America.

Science

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Birds, Climate Change, Models, Biodiversity, Ecology

Climate Change Models of Bird Impacts Pass the Test

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A major study looking at changes in where UK birds have been found over the past 40 years has validated the latest climate change models being used to forecast impacts on birds and other animals.







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