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Article ID: 699068

Bird Communities Dwindle on New Mexico’s Pajarito Plateau

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers have found declines in the number and diversity of bird populations at nine sites surveyed in northern New Mexico, where eight species vanished over time while others had considerably dropped.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 4:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699028

Play-Doh Helps Plant Research

University of Delaware

You know that smell of fresh cut grass? It's a cry for help. Plants use scent cues to protect themselves and new research has identified the use of these plant volatiles in agricultural settings.

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15-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698619

UF Study: Snail Kites Must Do More Than Move to Thrive

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

For a new study, UF/IFAS researchers used nine years of data to find out whether snail kites are reproducing after they move, and how these findings might change conservation strategies.

Released:
6-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jul-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697913

Creating a (Synthetic) Song from a Zebra Finch’s Muscle

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Birds create songs by moving muscles in their vocal organs to vibrate air passing through their tissues, and new research shows that these muscles act in concert to create sound. Scientists describe how zebra finches produce songs in this week’s Chaos: Using electromyographic signals, they tracked the activity of one muscle involved in creating sound, the syringealis ventralis. They then used the data from this muscle to create a synthetic zebra finch song.

Released:
25-Jul-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 698089

For Spinal Fusion Surgery Patients, Taking Opioids Before Surgery Is Major Risk Factor for Long-Term Opioid Use

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Patients taking opioids for at least three months before spinal fusion surgery in the lower spine are much more likely to continue taking opioids one year after surgery, reports a study in Spine. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
26-Jul-2018 10:10 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697487

Variations of a Single Gene Drive Diverse Pigeon Feather Patterns

University of Utah

In a new study, biologists have discovered that different versions of a single gene, called NDP (Norrie Disease Protein), have unexpected links between color patterns in pigeons, and vision defects in humans. The gene variations were likely bred into pigeons by humans from a different pigeon species and are now evolutionarily advantageous in wild populations of feral pigeons living in urban environments.

Released:
17-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697256

Study Raises Concern About Flame-Retardant Metabolites in Bald Eagles

Indiana University

A study finds that chemicals used in flame retardants, plasticizers and other commercial products are broken down through the process of metabolism into other compounds. Researchers say not enough is known about the dangers posed by those compounds, known as metabolites.

Released:
11-Jul-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697057

Crows vs. Ravens: A Numbers Game Study Finds Crow Mobbing Is a Key Strategy Against a Bigger Bird

Cornell University

ew research is adding validity to the adage "Birds of a feather flock together." A citizen-science-based report published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that when crows team up to take on a bigger foe it can be a highly successful strategy.

Released:
5-Jul-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695702

Flickers: The Closer You Look, The Less Different They Are

Cornell University

In a new study, researchers directly compared more than 16,000 DNA locations, and for the first time found clear evidence of genetic differences between Red-shafted and Yellow-shafted Flickers.

Released:
6-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695643

Ocean Warming, 'Junk-Food' Prey Cause of Massive Seabird Die-Off, Study Finds

University of Washington

A new University of Washington-led paper pinpoints starvation as the cause of death for hundreds of thousands of Cassin's auklet seabirds in late 2014 to early 2015.

Released:
5-Jun-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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