Feature Channels:

Birds

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Animal Health Diagnostic , Animal Health Diagnostic Center, Eagles, Krysten Schuler, Lead Poisoning

Tracing a Lethal Legacy: Lead Poisoning in NYS Bald Eagles

Medicine

Science

Channels:

SARS, MERS, Coronavirus

New Antiviral Drug Inhibits Epidemic SARS, MERS and Animal Coronaviruses

A new antiviral drug candidate inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including the SARS and MERS coronaviruses, a multi-institutional team of investigators reports this week in Science Translational Medicine. The findings support further development of the drug candidate for treating and preventing current coronavirus infections and potential future epidemic outbreaks.

Science

Channels:

Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Material Science, material sciences, materials science engineering, materials sciences, Science Advances, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, Magnetism, Magnetic, Particles, magnetic particles , Tracking, Self Assemble, Self Assembling, Self Assembly, self-assemble , self-assembled, self-assembly, Mixing, Birds, fish,

Magnetic Particles that Flock Like Birds

BES-2017-06-l-lrg.jpg

Tracking movements of individual particles provides understanding of collective motions, synchronization and self-assembly.

Science

Channels:

Evolution Biology, Taxonomy, Parrots, Biodiveristy, Zoology

The Blue-Winged Amazon: A New Parrot Species From the Yucatán Peninsula

In 2014, during a visit to a remote part of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, ornithologist Dr. Miguel A. Gómez Garza came across parrots with a completely different colour pattern from other known species. A study published today in the open-access journal PeerJ names these birds as a new species.

Science

Channels:

Sociality, Altruism, Cooperative Breeding, Babysitting

How Did Bird Babysitting Co-Ops Evolve?

8467597084_4bcddcec5f_b.jpeg

It's easy to make up a story to explain an evolved trait; proving that's what happened is much harder. Here scientists test ideas about cooperative breeding in birds and find a solution that resolves earlier disagreements.

Science

Channels:

Biology, Biodiveristy, Genetics, Evolution

Genetic Analysis of New World Birds Confirms Untested Evolutionary Assumption

Biologists have always been fascinated by the diversity and changeability of life on Earth and have attempted to answer a fundamental question: How do new species originate?

Science

Channels:

algal bloom, Feces, Ecosystem, Reservoir, Water Pollution, Dead Zone, Nitrogen, Phosphorus

When Birds of a Feather Poop Together

Pic1.jpg

Algal blooms deplete oxygen in lakes, produce toxins, and end up killing aquatic life in the lake. Researchers are tracing the role of bird feces, which are rich in phosphorus and nitrogen.

Science

Channels:

loon conservation, Wyoming, Common Loon, Environment, Ricketts Conservation Foundation, Loons

BRI Reports Status of Common Loon Species in Wyoming

Biodiversity Research Institute will hold its annual meeting of the Wyoming Loon Working Group in Jackson Hole, Wyoming on May 24. Collaborators from state and federal agencies, nongovernmental research and conservation groups, and local universities will meet to discuss the status of Common Loons in the state. These meetings are an integral part of Wyoming’s conservation efforts regarding loons.

Science

Channels:

Brain, Evolution, Science, Song Birds, Ingelligence, Cornell University, Psychology

In Brain Evolution, Size Matters – Most of the Time

Which came first, overall bigger brains or larger brain regions that control specialized behaviors? Neuroscientists have debated this question for decades, but a new Cornell University study settles the score.

Science

Channels:

University of Washington, sage grouse, Birds, Conservation, Conservation Biology, Conservation Reserve Program

Shrubs, Grasses Planted Through Federal Program Crucial for Sage Grouse Survival in Eastern Washington

20100415-STGresearch-MASreleasingextramale-WoodworthlekID-Heinlen.jpg

A federal program that pays farmers to plant agricultural land with environmentally beneficial vegetation is probably the reason that sage grouse still live in portions of Washington’s Columbia Basin, according to a new study by UW, state and federal researchers.







Chat now!