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Pain of Rejection Makes Us More Likely to Commit Fraud

People commit fraud because they are unhappy about being rejected, a new study in Frontiers in Psychology has found.

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Lack of Sleep Increases a Child's Risk for Emotional Disorders Later

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When asked how lack of sleep affects emotions, common responses are usually grumpy, foggy and short-tempered. While many jokes are made about how sleep deprivation turns the nicest of people into a Jekyll and Hyde, not getting enough shut-eye can lead to far more serious consequences than irritability, difficulty concentrating and impatience.

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When It Comes to Empathy, Don't Always Trust Your Gut

Is empathy the result of gut intuition or careful reasoning? Research published by the American Psychological Association suggests that, contrary to popular belief, the latter may be more the case.

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In the News: Drivers Frustrated by Lane Merge Method

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It’s called “zipper merge,” and more and more transportation departments around the country are encouraging motorists to use it, according to an Associated Press report by Bill Draper. That’s when a driving lane is closed ahead, and motorists use all available lanes and alternate entry into the open lane when they reach the lane closure. Missouri and Kansas have recently joined Minnesota and Washington in encouraging use of the “zipper merge.”

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Does Social Status Affect Generosity?

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High-ranking people don't always turn out to be selfish jerks. It all depends on whether they feel worthy of their prominent social position, new research indicates.

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New Intellectual Disability Syndrome Caused by Genetic Damage to Single Gene

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics have found a gene responsible for an intellectual disability disorder and proven how it works. The research, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, details the role of a gene called BCL11A in a new intellectual disability syndrome.

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The Medical Minute: New Therapy Often Successful at Controlling Tics

As common as it is, not all children who develop tics receive an official diagnosis, and many outgrow it. When one demonstrates both motor and vocal tics for more than a year, they are diagnosed with Tourette syndrome. A new intervention is finding success in helping them control their condition.

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Here’s Why Run-Down Schools Trigger Low Test Scores

Lorraine Maxwell, an associate professor of design and environmental analysis at Cornell University, studied more than 230 New York City public middle schools and found a chain reaction at work: leaking toilets, smelly cafeterias, broken furniture, and run-down classrooms made students feel negatively which lead to high absenteeism and in turn, contributed to low test scores and poor academic achievement.

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Cutting Through the Clutter: Study Examines 'Dark Side of Home'

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The phrase “make yourself at home” seems innocuous but there is a significant psychological element to it that few may consider. The concept implies that a conscious effort must be employed in the endeavor. For some it’s as easy as good people in a good location. But according to a recent study, the most common method of “making oneself at home” is by identifying with the objects that are kept in the home — and that kind of attachment can have significant consequences if left unchecked.

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Screening for Suicide Risk Among Urban Children Vitally Important

Screening for suicide risk among publicly insured urban children who are experiencing psychological distress is vitally important, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Emotional Appeal Is a Crucial Ingredient for a Product's Success

Many new food products fail, but that might not be the case if manufacturers better understood the emotions behind consumer choices, says psychologist Herb Meiselman, an expert in the fields of sensory and consumer research. Product developers need to think about how foods make people feel when they’re creating new products, according to Meiselman, a speaker at a July 19 symposium at IFT16: Where Science Feeds Innovation, hosted by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT).

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Map Provides Detailed Picture of How the Brain Is Organized

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A detailed new map by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis lays out the landscape of the human cerebral cortex. The map will accelerate progress in the study of brain diseases, as well as help to elucidate what makes us unique as a species.

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Toronto Expert to Headline International Conference on Chromosome-Based Condition

Leading scientists from over 20 countries will present their latest findings on 22q, a syndrome caused by a small deletion on the 22nd chromosome, at the 10th Biennial International 22q11.2 Conference beginning today in Sirmione, Italy. Newborn screening, recent studies of non-invasive prenatal testing, best practice management and prevention methods across the lifespan of a patient with 22q, will be discussed during the two-day meeting.

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Study Shows Changes in Brain Activity After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in Adolescents

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) are studying how cognitive therapy that uses mindfulness techniques, such as meditation, quiet reflection and facilitator-led discussion, may serve as an adjunct to pharmacological treatments for youth with anxiety disorders.

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Selective Retention of Positive Information May Be Marker for Elderly Memory Loss

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People who selectively recalled positive information over neutral and negative information performed worse on memory tests conducted by University of California, Irvine neurobiologists, who said the results suggest that this discriminating remembrance may be a marker for early stages of memory loss in the elderly.

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After Psychiatric Hospital Discharge, Many Patients Are Still Taking Multiple Antipsychotic Drugs

– In recent years, measures have been introduced to reduce the rate of "antipsychotic polypharmacy"—taking more than one antipsychotic drug—among patients with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses. But at least 12 percent of patients are still prescribed multiple antipsychotics after an inpatient stay at a state psychiatric hospital, according to an analysis of nationwide data in the July Journal of Psychiatric Practice®, published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Abnormalities Found in ‘Insight’ Areas of the Brain in Anorexia

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Abnormalities in brain regions involved in forming insight may help explain why some people with anorexia nervosa have trouble recognizing their dangerous, dysfunctional eating habits.

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Trauma of Racism Playing Out Tragically for Black Americans and Police Officers, Kennesaw State Psychology Professor Says

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Some Adolescent Cancer Survivors May Require More Comprehensive Mental Health Screening

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Research from the Childhood Cancer Survivors Study has identified distinct profiles of psychological symptoms in adolescent cancer survivors; a finding that is expected to advance mental health screening and treatment.

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In Gauging and Correcting Errors, Brain Plays Confidence Game, New Research Shows

The confidence in our decision-making serves to both gauge errors and to revise our approach, New York University neuroscientists have found. Their study offers insights into the hierarchical nature of how we make choices over extended periods of time, ranging from medical diagnoses and treatment to the strategies we use to invest our money.