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Research, benefits of good news, Positive Psychology, Psychology, Cohabitation, Military Behavioral Health, social psychol, Social Psychiatry Research

Research: Sharing Good News Improves Sleep, Health

SPOKANE, Wash. – New research from Sarah Arpin, assistant professor of psychology at Gonzaga University, concludes that partners who share good news, and believe their partners are receptive and supportive, sleep better. This is likely correlated to a decrease in loneliness and improved overall health, noted Arpin, who presented her research on military couples and relational health at the 2017 Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention in late January.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Chance, Future, Happy

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 9:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Suicide Attempts, Suicide Awareness and Prevention, Teenage suicide, same-sex marriage, Sexual Orientation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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B Vitamins Reduce Schizophrenia Symptoms

A review of worldwide studies has found that add-on treatment with high-dose b-vitamins - including B6, B8 and B12 - can significantly reduce symptoms of schizophrenia more than standard treatments alone.

Science

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Momentary Attention Switching Easily Causes Pilot Errors, Like Alleged Harrison Ford Runway Mix-Up

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Experts on aviation and perception, Stephen Macknik and Susana Martinez-Conde comment on the factors that can lead to pilot errors, such as the reported incident involving actor Harrison Ford landing his plane in close brush with a 737 at John Wayne Airport on Wednesday.

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Doctors Prescribe More Antibiotics When Expectations Are High, Study Says

Experimental evidence confirms what surveys have long suggested: Physicians are more likely to prescribe antibiotics when they believe there is a high expectation of it from their patients, even if they think the probability of bacterial infection is low and antibiotics would not be effective, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.

Medicine

Science

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Schizophrenia, Autism, neurologic disorder

Kennesaw State University Scientists Conducting Cutting-Edge Research

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Two Kennesaw State University scientists have received a total of $737,364 in National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health grants for developmental biology research into autism and birth defects.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Obestiy, Teenagers, Teens, Exercise, Physical Activity, physical activity counseling, pediatric psychology, Health Promotion, Exercise Motivation

Getting Inside Teens’ Heads: Study Upsets Beliefs About Feelings and Exercise Probability

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A pilot study tracking adolescents’ internal psychological states and physical activity in near real-time challenges prevailing assumptions about how to increase physical activity.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Emotions Are Cognitive, Not Innate, Researchers Conclude

Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of information, New York University Professor Joseph LeDoux and Richard Brown, a professor at the City University of New York, conclude.

Science

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Biophysics, Physiology, Aggression, stance, Posture, plantigrade, heel, Primate, Evolution

Flat-Footed Fighters

Walking on our heels, a feature that separates great apes, including humans, from other primates, confers advantages in fighting, according to a new University of Utah study published today in Biology Open. Although moving from the balls of the feet is important for quickness, standing with heels planted allows more swinging force, according to study lead author and biologist David Carrier, suggesting that aggression may have played a part in shaping our stance.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Social & Behavioral Sciences, Urban Areas, Behavior Change, city dwellers, city

Population Density Pushes the “Slow Life”

But a new study by Arizona State University shows the opposite may be true – that one psychological effect of population density is for those people to adopt a “slow life strategy.” This strategy focuses more on planning for the long-term future and includes tactics like preferring long-term romantic relationships, having fewer children and investing more in education.

Medicine

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Schizophrenia, Psychiatry, psychiatric diseases

New Rutgers–Princeton Center Uses Computational Models to Understand Psychiatric Conditions

New Rutgers–Princeton Center Uses Computational Models to Understand Psychiatric Conditions

Medicine

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CRF, CRFR1 , hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system, PVN, Stress, Chronic Stress, CHEN

Keeping Up the Pressure

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The lab of Prof. Alon Chen has found that, besides the classic stress response – an acute reaction that gradually abates when the threat passes – our bodies appear to have a separate mechanism that deals only with chronic stress. These findings may lead to better diagnosis of and treatment for anxiety and depression.

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TSRI Researchers Discover How the Brain Turns Chronic Stress into Pathological Anxiety

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In a new study, researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have described how two important molecules in the brain work together to trigger intense anxiety.

Medicine

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Smoking, Cessation, e-cigarettes, Depression, Depressive Symptoms

Depression Linked to E-Cigarette Use Among College Students

The emergence of e-cigarettes as a nicotine product has left scientists with many questions about their impact on health, including how the product interacts with depression. A new study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), published today in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, found a connection between depression and initiation of e-cigarette use among college students.

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Babies, Born, Weight

Low Birth Weight Babies at Higher Risk for Mental Health Problems Later in Life

Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years.

Medicine

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Hospice, Depression, Aniexty, Caregiver

Caregivers Should Be Screened Early, Often to Prevent Depression, Anxiety

Currently, more than 34 million people in the U.S. care for terminally ill love ones, but few resources are available to help them navigate the challenges they encounter. A study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine found that nearly one-quarter of caregivers were moderately or severely depressed and nearly one-third had moderate or severe anxiety. The researchers recommend that health providers remember to treat the whole family, providing ongoing screening to family caregivers to identify early signs of depression and anxiety.

Medicine

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Physiology, Concussion, sports-related concussion, Sports-Related Head Injury, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, Cardiovascular System, Autonomic Nervous System, Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

Sports-Related Concussion Negatively Affects Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Romance, Valentine's Day, Couples and affection, Couples and communication , Baylor University, Psychology

Romance and Wrangling as Valentine’s Day Nears: Here’s How to Handle Feuds with Your Partner

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Fighting with your sweetie as Valentine’s Day approaches? Consider this as Cupid aims his bow and arrow yet again. “The most common thing that couples want from each other during a conflict is not an apology, but a willingness to give up power,” says Baylor University psychologist Keith Sanford, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology and neuroscience.

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