Feature Channels:

Poverty

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Food Stamps, Food Assistance Program, Stamp, Low Income Families

5 Minute Chats in the Waiting Room May Prompt Families to Eat More Fruits and Vegetables

Low-income families were more likely to use federal food assistance on nutritious food after learning that their dollars can be doubled for more fruits and vegetables, a new study finds.

Medicine

Channels:

India, Rabies, Virus, Vaccine, Vaccination, Public Health, Developing World, Developing world diseases

Study Finds Vaccination Is the Most Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Rabies Deaths in India

Every year in India, about 20,000 people die from rabies. Most of the victims are children. Nearly all of the deaths occur after victims are bitten by rabid dogs. For years, experts have debated the best strategy to reduce this burden. Now, a new study has identified a cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies.

Medicine

Channels:

Raising Quality, Alternate Payment, Quality Of Care, Low-Income Patients, improving quality, Health Care, Alternate Quality Contract, AQC, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Massachusetts Health Care, Socioeconomics, Cost of Health Care

Raising Quality

harvardmedimage1-11-17_1.jpeg

Alternative payment model boosts quality of care for low-income patients

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

help to save, Finance, just managing familes, debt, Savings, Savings Accounts, household budgets

‘Just About Managing’ Families Need More Help to Save Researchers Say

Three-fifths of low and middle income households are currently unable to save money, while for people already saving, the ratio between spending and saving is dramatically falling, researchers say. A new report from CHASM, University of Birmingham’s research Centre on Household Assets and Savings Management, is calling on the government and employers to do more to help those on lower incomes to start saving.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

sedentary behavior, Physical Activity, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Shari Barkin, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, accelerometer, Mac Buchowski, Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW) Trial, University of Minnesota, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Hu

Vanderbilt-Led Study Finds Parent’s Physical Activity Associated with Preschooler Activity in Underserved Populations

Preschool-age children from low-income families are more likely to be physically active if parents increase activity and reduce sedentary behavior while wearing movement monitors (accelerometers), according to a Vanderbilt study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Childhood Poverty, Developmental Psychology, Environmental Psychology, Human Development, Mental Health, Physiological Stress, Poverty, Psychological Health, Stress

Childhood Poverty Can Rob Adults of Psychological Health

A large and growing body of research shows that poor kids grow up to have a host of physical problems as adults.

Medicine

Channels:

universal health coverage, Universal Health Care, Global Health, Value in Health, Kalipso Chalkidou, Anthony Culyer, Vaccine Economics, International Decision Support Initiative , National Health Service , UHC

Moving Toward Universal Health Care Coverage: Exploring Policy Trends in Countries Rich and Poor

ViH_Cover_2016-12.jpg

The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) announced today the publication of a series of articles exploring trends in policy and methods regarding the country-specific provision of universal health care coverage. This special themed section, "Economics of Making Choices on the Journey to Universal Health Care Coverage," was published in the December issue of Value in Health.

Medicine

Channels:

Asthma, Public Health, community medicine, Poverty, Housing, Philadelphia, community health workers, Minority Health

Home Visits Uncover Fuller Picture of Multiple Challenges Among Low-Income Adults with Asthma

Nationally, the highest rates of asthma-related deaths and hospitalizations are among low-income minority adults, but most existing research doesn’t focus on these patients. In particular, studies may not investigate patients where they live, in complicated, difficult circumstances. Many adult asthma patients have multiple diseases and exposure to tobacco smoke, but much research reflects the convenience of recruiting patients in clinics and on the relative simplicity of studying patients who do not have accompanying diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Image of ‘Typical’ Welfare Recipient Linked With Racial Stereotypes

10.1177_0956797616674999-fig2.gif

When thinking about a welfare recipient, people tend to imagine someone who is African American and who is lazier and less competent than someone who doesn’t receive welfare benefits, according to new findings in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Russian Hacking Experts, Ejecting "Illegals" Drives Foreclosures in Latino Communities, The Latest GW Battleground Poll, and More in U.S. Politics News Source

Go here for the latest political experts, features and research in U.S. Politics

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Longevity, Life Expectancy, Death Rate, Economics, American Dream

WashU Expert: Economic stress played role in increasing U.S. death rate

Greater stress and anxiety resulting from economic insecurity may be at least partly to blame for the U.S. death rate that the government announced Dec. 8 has increased for the first time in a decade, says an expert on poverty and inequality at Washington University in St. Louis.“For the first time since 1993, the overall life-expectancy rate in the United States last year actually went down, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” said Mark Rank, the Herbert S.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Immigration, Latino, Foreclosure, Housing Market, Trump, Deportation, Home owners, Housing Crash

Deporting the American Dream: Ejecting Illegals Drives Foreclosures in Latino Communities

Early in his presidential campaign, Donald Trump said he would deport all of the estimated 11 million immigrants who are in the United States illegally.

Medicine

Channels:

Bill And Melinda Gates Foundation, Data Visualization, Health, childhood growth

Rensselaer Data Project Addresses Childhood Stunting in Developing Nations

canstockphoto12791132.jpg

Support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will lead to interactive data visualization platform

Medicine

Channels:

Neal Fedarko, Peter M. Abadir, Peter Abadir, Autoantibody, Blood, Angiotensin

New Link Discovered Between Class of Rogue Autoantibodies and Poor Health Outcomes

Elderly_Pixabay.jpg

Results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers offer new evidence for a strong link between angiotensin receptor autoantibodies and increased risk of frailty. In a report on the work, published online in the journal Circulation on Nov. 30, the team says a large class of common blood pressure drugs that target the angiotensin receptor, called angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), may help patients depending on the levels of the autoantibodies.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Housing, Subsidized Housing, Public Housing, Academic Achievement, Poverty, Education

Subsidized Housing Works Better for Some Kids Than Others

Living in subsidized housing seems to give a boost to children with high standardized test scores and few behavior problems, but it has the opposite effect on students who score poorly and have behavioral issues, a new study finds.

Medicine

Channels:

Poverty, poverty and health, Brain Development In Children

Prevention Program Safeguards Children’s Brains From Effects of Poverty, Says UGA Study

GeneBrody1.jpg

A University of Georgia research team has shown for the first time that participation in a prevention program known as the Strong African American Families Program, which enhances supportive parenting and strengthens family relationships, removes the effects of poverty on brain development.

Medicine

Channels:

Homeless, help for homeless, Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, Soles for Souls

Doctors with Sole

IMG_3710.JPG

This Wednesday, Nov. 30, Drs. Simon Lee, Johnny Lin and Kamran Hamid, foot and ankle surgeons at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, and a group of residents, physician assistants and medical students from Rush University Medical Center, will give shoes, socks and medical care to homeless men and women at a shelter on Chicago’s west side.

Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Economy, Poverty, Great Recession, Deprivation, Georgia Tech, poverty studies, Health, Education, Standard of Living, Housing

Poverty Should Be Measured by More Than Income

ShataksheeDhongde_1.jpeg

Georgia Tech Economist Shatakshee Dhgonde’s research reveals there are multiple dimensions of deprivation, and those dimensions can impact a person’s sense of financial security. She specifically cites six measures as being a more accurate assessment of a person’s financial condition than income alone.

Medicine

Channels:

Vaccine, Typhoid, typhoid fever, Gates Foundation, Developing World, Poverty, Urban

International Consortium Receives $36.9 Million Grant to Fight Typhoid

Typhoid fever remains a serious global problem: it kills almost a quarter of a million people annually. To help promote typhoid vaccines, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has given a $36.9 million grant to the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development (CVD). The project is a partnership with the Oxford Vaccine Group and PATH.

Life

Education

Channels:

Civic Engagement, Youth, Income Inequality

The Kids Are Alright: Youth Are Civically Engaged, Despite Income Inequality

Income inequality is linked with greater civic engagement among youth, particularly among youth of color and those of lower socioeconomic status, finds a study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.







Chat now!