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Change in Process of Disinfecting Spinach, Salad Greens Could Reduce Illness Outbreaks

Cross contamination in commercial processing facilities that prepare spinach and other leafy greens for the market can make people sick. But researchers are reporting a new, easy-to-implement method that could eliminate or reduce such incidences. The scientists will present their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Eliminating Water-Borne Bacteria with Pages From the Drinkable Book™ Could Save Lives

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Human consumption of bacterially contaminated water causes millions of deaths each year throughout the world—primarily among children. A researcher at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society today will discuss an inexpensive, simple and easily transportable nanotechnology-based method to purify drinking water. She calls it The Drinkable BookTM, and each page is impregnated with bacteria-killing metal nanoparticles.

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High Rates of Violence, HIV Infection for Adolescents in Sex Trade on U.S.-Mexico Border

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that more than one in four female sex workers in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border entered the sex trade younger than age 18; one in eight before their 16th birthday. These women were more than three times more likely to become infected with HIV than those who started sex work as adults.

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Social Factors Linked to Heart Disease for All

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“Poverty and the many stresses that come with social disadvantage have long been linked to cardiovascular disease, but how we live, work, and play has a great impact on heart health for people from a broad range of economic and cultural backgrounds,” explains David Siscovick, MD, MPH, Senior Vice President for Research at The New York Academy of Medicine and Chair of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Council on Epidemiology and Prevention.

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#KState Expert Comments on Child Poverty, Well-Being of Kansas Children

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Poverty and Child Development, Race and Heart Health, Pot to Treat Pain, and More Top Stories 21 July 2015

Other topics include genetics to predict prostate cancer, Facebook and body image, bioengineered immune cell response, and more...

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Poverty’s Most Insidious Damage Is to a Child’s Brain

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A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. In an accompanying editorial, child psychiatrist Joan L. Luby, MD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, writes that “early childhood interventions to support a nurturing environment for these children must now become our top public health priority for the good of all.”

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New Book Shows Companies How to Lift People out of Extreme Poverty While Also Turn a Profit

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More than a dozen years have passed since Professor Stuart Hart co-authored the landmark paper “The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid.” Two books and major investments followed from corporations looking to capitalize from -- and liberate -- the four billion people living on $8 a day.

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Supreme Court Ruling On Fair Housing Will Help Improve Quality of Life For Low-Income Housing Residents, Expert Says

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Stress in Low-Income Families Can Affect Children’s Learning

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Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from the University of Rochester.