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The Best Way to Help Homeless Youth Is Hardly Ever Used

– Teens without homes, many of whom have suffered at the hands of those entrusted with providing them care and kindness, often refuse to seek warmth and nourishment at shelters.

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Poverty Linked to Childhood Depression, Changes in Brain Connectivity

Analyzing brain scans of 105 children ages 7 to 12, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that key structures in the brain are connected differently in poor children than in kids raised in more affluent settings. In particular, the brain's hippocampus -- a structure key to learning, memory and regulation of stress -- and the amygdala -- which is linked to stress and emotion -- connect to other areas of the brain differently in poor children than in those whose families had higher incomes.

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Albright Institute at Wellesley College Brings Together World Leaders on Economic Development for Public Dialogue on Global Inequality

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Several of the world’s most influential leaders in global economic policy will take part in a public dialogue, entitled “Addressing Global Inequality,” on January 31, 2016, at Wellesley College’s Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs. The event will feature Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund; Sri Mulyani Indrawati, managing director and chief operating officer of the World Bank; and Mark Malloch-Brown, former deputy secretary general and chief of staff for the United Nations. Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright ’59, a Wellesley alumna who founded the Institute, will also take part in the public dialogue. This year’s Institute addresses the complicated issues related to global inequality.

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The Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting Is Now Accepting Submissions

The deadline for this round of proposals is January 15, 2016. Candidates will be notified of decisions by the end of February 2016. The Institute pays a competitive rate--and covers expenses--for investigative reporting that advances social and economic justice. All stories are published in In These Times magazine and on InTheseTimes.com.

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It Pays to Graduate: Texas Alum Earned $150K More Than Non-Graduates

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University of Texas System graduates earned $147,910 more in salary over 10 years than students who enrolled at a UT System academic institution but did not graduate.

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New Research Shows Gray Divorced Women Are More Likely to Be Poor

More and more adults are entering their golden years alone, either through gray divorce, or by choosing to stay unmarried, and for older women, Social Security benefits often aren’t enough to stave off poverty.

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Top Stories 11 Dec 2015; New Forensic Science Breakthroughs, Breast Cancer Treatment Difference by Age, Racial Disparities in Dialysis, and More...

Click to view today's top stories.

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Vaccination Rates Among Children Living in Poverty Improve with Home Intervention and Education

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A program by Stony Brook Children’s Hospital that involves the use of trained community health workers on child immunization reveals that home intervention improves vaccine rates in at-risk children.

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The Importance of Place When It Comes to New Yorker’s Mental Health

New research from The New York Academy of Medicine reveals the circumstances contributing to mental health problems in a range of urban residents.

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Mapping a Better Way to Help Provide Humanitarian Services, Relief

West Virginia University, Texas Tech University and George Washington University use $1 million USAID grant to establish high quality mapping program to help world's most vulnerable people

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World Bank Report Warns that Climate Change Could Lead 100 Million into Poverty by 2030

A new report by the World Bank reveals that climate change could force more that 100 million into living under the poverty line by 2030, thusly eliminating any gains.

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National Study: For Low-Income Children, Preventive Care Is More Likely in Medicaid and CHIP Than Under Private Insurance

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Researchers say that children in low-income families experience greater access to preventive medical and dental care under Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program than children covered by private insurance. However, for all types of insurance, access to pediatric specialty care is a challenge.

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Britain Lags Behind in Reducing Infant Mortality and Child Poverty

Britain has the fourth highest rate of infant mortality of all Western countries. More seriously, the high death rates of British children correlate with high child poverty and with a lack of investment in healthcare, according to research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

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Lower-Income, Elderly, Women Less Likely to Complete Cardiac Rehab After Bypass – Previously Linked to Higher Mortality Risk

Bypass patients who are older, female and/or from lower-income neighbourhoods are more likely to face delays in beginning cardiac rehabilitation (CR), making them less likely to complete CR, which can lead to a higher mortality risk, suggests a new study.

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Pinpointing Poverty with Cellphone Data

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Researchers believe that call data records from millions of people, when fused with census and household survey data, can be used to drill down to at least 123 arrondissements (similar to U.S. counties) nationwide, providing an unparalleled look at which communities lack access to food, health care, education and other human necessities.

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Childhood Obesity Is Linked to Poverty and Parenting Style

Strategies to combat the rising problem need to reflect these factors, suggests new research from Concordia University.

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Poverty Influences the Effects of Race and Education on Pain After Knee Replacement Surgery

Findings from a new study conducted by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery suggest that lower socioeconomic status at the community level significantly increases the risk of pain and poor function following a knee replacement.

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Advanced Kidney Disease May Increase the Likelihood of Falling Into Poverty

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Among patients with chronic kidney disease, more severe stages of disease were significant predictors of falling into poverty, as were black ethnicity, low educational attainment, single adult household, and low income. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3–8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

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Deaths from Chronic Diseases Now Hitting Poorest Households Hard in Bangladesh

The number of people in Bangladesh dying from chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes and hypertension—long considered diseases of the wealthy because the poor didn’t tend to live long enough to develop them—increased dramatically among the nation’s poorest households over a 24-year period, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Does Knowing High-Status People Help or Hurt?

How happy you are may have something to do with who you know—and where you come from. Lijun Song, assistant professor of sociology, set out to discover whether knowing high-status people helped or harmed mental health, using depressive symptoms as a proxy. Her findings appear in the July 2015 issue of Social Science and Medicine.