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Science

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Trump Administration, anti-Semitism, Jewish American, Jewish Community, Racism, Steve Bannon, Muslim American, Discrimination

This Is What Trump Must Do to Truly Stop Anti-Semitism

Medicine

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Drugs That Alter Inhibitory Targets Offer Therapeutic Strategies for Autism, Schizophrenia

Researchers at SUNY Downstate recently discovered that an inhibitory brain receptor triggers synaptic pruning in adolescence. Drugs that selectively target these receptors, when administered during adolescence, can alter synapse number, with possible implications for the treatment of autism and schizophrenia.

Science

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Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dots, Exoplanet, NAS, Habitable planets

Sagan Institute Director Available to Offer Insight Into New NASA Exoplanet Research

Life

Arts and Humanities

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National Endowment For The Arts, National Endowment For The Humanities, Humanities, Federal Budget, Humanities community councils, budget cuts, NEH, NEA

National Endowment for the Humanities: Minute Investment with Massive Impact

Life

Education

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Four NYU Faculty Win Sloan Foundation Research Fellowships

Four New York University faculty have been awarded fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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PTSD, Conduct Disorder, Trauma, Teens, Youth, Psychology, Shabnam Javdani, NYU Steinhardt, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University

Teens with PTSD and Conduct Disorder Have Difficulty Recognizing Facial Expressions

Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study led by NYU’s Steinhardt School.

Medicine

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Stroke, Physical Therapy, physical therapist

Study on Walking Ability Shows Path to Treatment for Stroke Survivors

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Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older adults in the United States, but research by Clarkson University Physical Therapy Professor George Fulk and his colleagues is pointing the way to recovery for people who are relearning how to walk.

Science

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MARS, planetary geology, Insight

Geneseo Planetary Geologist Involved in Determining Next Mars Rover Landing Site

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Nicholas Warner, assistant professor of geology, was among planetary geologists recently presenting evidence to NASA scientists on the best Mars landing sites for the next rover mission, scheduled to launch in 2020.

Science

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Forest, urban forests, rural forests, Migration, Ecosystem, Mapping, forest dynamics

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Feb-2017 2:00 PM EST

Science

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genes, agriculture and climate change, climate change adaptation

Maize Study Finds Genes That Help Crops Adapt to Change

A new study analyzed close to 4,500 maize varieties to identify more than 1,000 genes driving large-scale adaptation to the environment.

Life

Pop Culture

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new england patriots, NFL, National Football League, Super Bowl, Politics, Sport In Society, Donald J. Trump, Donald Trump, White House

Sports Ethics Expert Available for Comment on Patriots Players Skipping White House Visit

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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diversity training, Workplace Issues, Cultural Differences, organizational bias, Cultural Awareness, business diversity, diversity programs

New Research Helps Organizations Deliver Stronger Diversity Training

While diversity training programs are a good way to build awareness of cultural differences, they usually are not as effective at changing attitudes and behaviors toward diverse groups in the workplace, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

Medicine

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Umbilical Cord, Umbilical Cord Blood, Stem Cell, Cord Blood Banking, New York

Upstate Opens Cord Blood Bank, Only the Second Public Cord Blood Bank in New York and One of Only 32 in the US

Upstate Medical University has opened a $15 million, 20,000 square foot cord blood bank that features a state of the art processing laboratory and cryogenic storage containers that can store nearly 14,500 units of cord blood. The bank will collect, test, process, store and distribute umbilical cord blood donated by families throughout central and northern New York to be used by those in need of life-saving medical treatments and for medical research.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, Aaas Fellow, Biomedical Sciences, Medical Eduction, Scientists, infectious microorganisms, Immunology, Biomedical Research, Aaas Public Engagement Fellows

NYITCOM’s Martinez Named AAAS Leshner Leadership Institute Public Engagement Fellow

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Luis Martinez, Ph.D., is an infectious disease researcher selected as a Fellow in the second cohort of the AAAS Alan I. Leshner Leadership Institute for Public Engagement with Science.

Medicine

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Cancer, Leukemia, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, FLT3, RUNX1

Tumor Suppressor Promotes Some Acute Myeloid Leukemias, Study Reveals

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Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, “RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,” which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

Medicine

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ICU mortality, COPD exacerbations, COPD, Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Pneumonia, Health Care Costs

ICU Care for COPD, Heart Failure and Heart Attack May Not Be Better

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Does a stay in the intensive care unit give patients a better chance of surviving a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure flare-up or even a heart attack, compared with care in another type of hospital unit? Unless a patient is clearly critically ill, the answer may be no, according to University of Michigan researchers who analyzed more than 1.5 million Medicare records. Their study, “ICU Admission and Survival among Older Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Heart Failure, or Myocardial Infarction,” is published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Science

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Biomedical Engineering, Food, Digestion, Food Additive, Small Intestine, Intestines, body, Health, Candy, gum, Titanium Dioxide, Nutrients, Cells, Meals, Eating, Metabolism, Diet, Nanoparticles, Digestive System, Toothpaste, milk, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton

Food Additive Found in Candy, Chewing Gum Could Alter Digestive Cell Structure and Function

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The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is “significantly decreased” after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread, according to research from Binghamton University

Science

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Government of Nigeria Drops Buffer Zone for Superhighway Project but More Must Be Done to Protect Communities and Wildlife

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The Cross River State government’s announcement yesterday to drop a 12-mile buffer around a proposed superhighway though one of Nigeria’s last rainforests is still not enough to prevent the loss of important community forests and significant impacts to the region’s wildlife if the project moves forward, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and its campaign effort to reroute the project entirely.

Medicine

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Stem Cell, Leukemia, MDs, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, CRISPR, Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists Create Novel Model That Shows Progression From Normal Blood Cells to Leukemia

Mount Sinai researchers have created a novel model that shows the step-by-step progression from normal blood cells to leukemia and its precursor diseases, creating replicas of the stages of the disease to test the efficacy of therapeutic interventions at each stage, according to a study to be published in Cell Stem Cell. This research marked the first time scientists have been able to transplant leukemia from humans to a test tube and then into mice for study, a landmark feat that will allow for valuable research to help find therapies for blood cancer patients in the future.







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