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Article ID: 696468

6 Berkeley Lab Researchers Receive DOE Early Career Research Awards

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Six scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science to receive significant funding for research through its Early Career Research Program.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696253

A Bit of Quantum Logic—What Did the Atom Say to the Quantum Dot?

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Let’s talk! Scientists demonstrate coherent coupling between a quantum dot and a donor atom in silicon, vital for moving information inside quantum computers.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696250

Carbon Nanotube Optics Poised to Provide Pathway to Optical-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computing

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week’s edition of the journal Nature Materials.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695981

Scientists Make First 'on Demand' Entanglement Link

Delft University of Technology

Researchers at QuTech in Delft have succeeded in generating quantum entanglement between two quantum chips faster than the entanglement is lost. Entanglement - once referred to by Einstein as "spooky action" - forms the link that will provide a future quantum internet its power and fundamental security. This opens the door to connect multiple quantum nodes and create the very first quantum network in the world.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 9:25 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695983

Making Quantum Puddles

University of Vermont

A team of physicists at the University of Vermont have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. Their study may allow scientists to create the thinnest films of liquid ever made—and engineer a new class of surface coatings and lubricants just a few atoms thick.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695949

Evidence for a New Property of Quantum Matter Revealed

Johns Hopkins University

A theorized but never-before detected property of quantum matter has now been spotted in the lab.

Released:
11-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695768

Hidden Magnetism Appears under Hidden Symmetry

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Sometimes a good theory just needs the right materials to make it work. That’s the case with recent findings by UT’s physicists and their colleagues, who designed a two-dimensional magnetic system that points to the possibility of devices with increased security and efficiency, using only a small amount of energy

Released:
7-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695551

Physicists use terahertz flashes to uncover new state of matter hidden by superconductivity

Iowa State University

A research team led by Jigang Wang of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory has developed a new quantum switching scheme that gives them access to new and hidden states of matter. The journal Nature Materials has just published a paper about the discovery.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695527

Rutgers-led Research Could Lead to More Efficient Electronics

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers-led team of physicists has demonstrated a way to conduct electricity between transistors without energy loss, opening the door to low-power electronics and, potentially, quantum computing that would be far faster than today’s computers. Their findings, which involved using a special mix of materials with magnetic and insulator properties, are published online in Nature Physics.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 11:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695516

Spooky Quantum Particle Pairs Fly Like Weird Curveballs

Georgia Institute of Technology

Those particles that can be in two places at the same time and are not just particles but also waves appear to move in even weirder ways than previously thought. Theoretical physicists at Georgia Tech applied extreme computing power for a week to predict the movements of fermions by including quantum optics, or light-like, ideas in their mathematical, theoretical modeling.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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