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Cardiovascular Health

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Medicine

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Paleo Diet, Heart Health, Inflammation, Cardiovacular Disease, Physiology

Could the Paleo Diet Benefit Heart Health?

Findings from a small study suggest that people who followed the Paleo diet for only eight weeks experienced positive effects on heart health. Preliminary findings from this research will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.

Medicine

Channels:

Obesity, Inflammation, heart disease risk factor, Metabolic Syndrome, Cardiovascular Disease, Heart Health, Physiology, Obesity Heart Disease Link, Genetics

Researchers Suspect MicroRNAs as Potential Link Between Obesity and Heart Disease

Results from a new study suggest that small molecules known as microRNAs may be part of the pathway connecting inflammation with increased heart disease risk in obese people. The new findings will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.

Medicine

Channels:

Atmospheric Science (Climate; Pollution/Remediation), Toxicology, Public Health, Cardiology, Health Care

Latest Research Reveals Sitting in Traffic Jams Is Officially Bad for You

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With millions of motorists set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution. Latest research from the University of Surrey has shown that simple adjustment to your car's ventilation system while sitting in traffic jams can greatly affect your exposure to toxic fumes by up to 76%.

Medicine

Channels:

Atheroclerosis, Cardiovascular Disease, High Blood Pressure, Amyloid Beta, Alzheimer's, Dementia, Physiology

Stiff Arteries Linked with Memory Problems, Mouse Study Suggests

Using a new mouse model, researchers have found that stiffer arteries can also negatively affect memory and other critical brain processes. The findings, which may eventually reveal how arterial stiffness leads to Alzheimer’s and other diseases involving dementia, will be presented at the American Physiological Society’s Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference.

Medicine

Channels:

Aortic Dissection, John Elefteriades, MD, Heart Condition, Aortic Institute at Yale, Aortic Aneurysm, Familial, Family History, Familial Dissection

Potentially Deadly Heart Condition Plagues Family Members Around Same Age

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People with a family member who had an aortic dissection—a spontaneous tear in one of the body’s main arteries—should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. According to a new study published online in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, aortic dissections have the potential to run in families and often occur within 10 years of the same age.

Medicine

Channels:

Heart Surgery, simulation training, Richard H. Feins, MD, Nahush A. Mokadam, MD, James I. Fann, MD, patient outcomes, Adverse Events, Surgery residents, Cardiac Surgery Simulation Consortium

Heart Surgery Residents Ready to Save Real Lives After ‘Out of Body’ Training Experience

Simulation training for surgery residents builds confidence and could have a life-saving impact on patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to two studies published online in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Medicine

Channels:

UAB Medicine, Mitral Valve Prolapse, mitral valve regurgitation, Mitral Valve Repair, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular disease (CVD), Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cardiology and Heart Surgery

New Study Questions Timing in Mitral Valve Repairs

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UAB doctors say new research is showing that patients who suffer from isolated mitral valve regurgitation may need surgery before symptoms appear.

Medicine

Channels:

Diet, Excercise, cardiovascuar health, Weightloss, Heart

Diet, Exercise, Both: All Work Equally to Protect Heart Health, Saint Louis University Study Finds

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For those who need to lose weight, taking off a few pounds by dieting, exercising or both is powerful protection against cardiovascular disease.

Medicine

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Challenging the Status Quo: UNC Cardiologist Examines Training, Staffing and Research in Cardiac Intensive Care

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Jason Katz, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine at UNC School of Medicine and medical director of the cardiac intensive care unit, was the lead author of a recently published manuscript that examined the early growth and maturation of critical care cardiology, and the challenges and uncertainties that threaten to stymie the growth of this fledgling discipline.

Medicine

Channels:

Aortic Stenosis, Valve Surgery, Valve Replacement, PinnacleHealth, Coronary Bypass Surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery

PinnacleHealth Implants Aortic Valve to First Patients in United States after FDA Approval for Commercial Use

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PinnacleHealth became the first hospital in the country to implant the EDWARDS INTUITY Elite valve, a rapid deployment device for surgical aortic valve replacement, after U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, amyloidosis

Amyloid-Related Heart Failure Now Detectable with Imaging Test

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular disease (CVD), Heart Health, Penn Medicine

Penn Medicine Researchers Predict Sudden Cardiac Death Risk

PHILADELPHIA — Each year more than 300,000 Americans will succumb to out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death (SCD) – the immediate and unexpected cessation of the heart’s ability to function properly – one of the leading causes of death in the United States. For the first time, a team of researchers led by Rajat Deo, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has developed and validated a prediction model to determine sudden cardiac death risk in adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Medicine

Channels:

Stroke, cardiopulmonary exercise test, Water, Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, physical medicine and rehabilitation

Aquatic Treadmill Walking May Increase Exercise Capacity After Stroke

For patients in rehabilitation after a stroke, walking on an underwater treadmill produces better measures of exercise performance compared to conventional treadmill walking, reports a study in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Science

Channels:

Inflammation, Imunology, Physiology, Scientific Meeting, Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiology

Researchers Convene to Explore Role of Inflammation, Immune Response in Cardiovascular Disease

A growing body of research points to the involvement of inflammation and the immune system on the development of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular physiologists and immunologists will meet to explore how these mechanisms interact at the Inflammation, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease conference in Westminster, Colo., on Aug. 24–27, 2016.

Medicine

Channels:

Chiadi Ndumele, Heart Failure, Heart Disease, Obesity, Obese

Severe Obesity Revealed as a Stand-Alone High-Risk Factor for Heart Failure

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A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease.

Medicine

Channels:

Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology , Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Genomics, Heart Disease, CVD

Mount Sinai Research Collaboration Identifies Genes Responsible for Risk of Developing Heart Attack, Stroke, and Related Cardiometabolic Diseases

In a study being published in the August 19 issue of Science, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in collaboration with scientists from Tartu University Hospital in Estonia, the Karolinska Institutet and Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) in Sweden, and AstraZeneca, have identified a profound new level of complexity and interaction among genes within specific tissues responsible for mediating the inherited risk for cardiometabolic diseases, including processes that lead to heart attack and stroke.

Medicine

Channels:

Stent, absorb stent, bioabsorbable stents

New Bioabsorbable Cardiac Stent Gradually Breaks Down into Water and Carbon Dioxide

The Absorb® stent remains intact until the artery has healed and no longer is in danger of collapsing. The stent gradually breaks down into water and carbon dioxide. After three years the stent is completely dissolved. The vessel remains open on its own, with no need of support.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Heart Institute, Cardiothoracic Surgeons, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stony Brook Medicine, Mount Sinai Health System, Appointment

Stony Brook Medicine Welcomes New Cardiothoracic Surgeons

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Joanna Chikwe, MD, has been appointed as Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Henry J. Tannous, MD, has been named Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Department of Surgery.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiac Health, Atherosclerosis, arterial health, Heart Disease, Blood Flow, Gerasimos A.T. Messaris, Maria Hadjinicolaou, George T. Karahalios, University of Patras, Hellenic Open University, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

Studying Blood Flow Dynamics to Identify the Heart of Vessel Failure

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New research from a fluid mechanics team in Greece reveals how blood flow dynamics within blood vessels may influence where plaques develop or rupture this week in Physics of Fluids. The findings could one day help doctors identify weak spots on a vessel wall that are likeliest to fail, and lead to early interventions in treating heart disease.

Medicine

Channels:

Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Heart, Cardiology, Arrythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Heart

Mount Sinai Pioneers New Approach for Cardiac Arrhythmia Patients Using the EpiAccess® System

The Mount Sinai Hospital is the first site in the New York metropolitan area to pioneer a new approach for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias using the EpiAccess® system.







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