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Benefit of Extending Anticoagulation Therapy Lost After Discontinuation of Therapy

Among patients with a first episode of pulmonary embolism (the obstruction of the pulmonary artery or a branch of it leading to the lungs by a blood clot) who received 6 months of anticoagulant treatment, an additional 18 months of treatment with warfarin reduced the risk of additional blood clots and major bleeding, however, the benefit was not maintained after discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, according to a study in the July 7 issue of JAMA.

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Memory & Thinking Ability Keep Getting Worse for Years After a Stroke, New Study Finds

A stroke happens in an instant. And many who survive one report that their brain never works like it once did. But new research shows that these problems with memory and thinking ability keep getting worse for years afterward – and happen faster than normal brain aging.

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Dementia Predictors, Autonomous Taxis, Extra Heartbeats, and More Top Stories 7 July 2015

Other topics include repairing injured nerves, busted heart attack treatment, decorative brain molecules, and more...

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Physical, Psychological Factors Have Varied Effects on Cognitive Function in Elderly Female Stroke Patients

An estimated 65 percent of ischemic stroke survivors experience cognitive impairment and decline. However, little is known about the varying roles of cognitive risk and protective factors before, during and after stroke.

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Heart Attack Treatment Hypothesis ‘Busted’

Researchers have long had reason to hope that blocking the flow of calcium into the mitochondria of heart and brain cells could be one way to prevent damage caused by heart attacks and strokes. But in a study of mice engineered to lack a key calcium channel in their heart cells, Johns Hopkins scientists appear to have cast a shadow of doubt on that theory. A report on their study is published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Extra Heartbeats Could Be Modifiable Risk Factor for Congestive Heart Failure

Common extra heartbeats known as premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) may be a modifiable risk factor for congestive heart failure (CHF) and death, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 8-Jul-2015 4:00 PM EDT

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Hispanic Health Disparities, Statins and Aggression in Men, Supercharged Stem Cells, and More Top Stories 6 July 2015

Other topics include memories and protein, physics and gas mileage, agriculture and food safety, vaccine for Dengue, retinoblastoma proteins in cancer progression, and more.

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Newly Approved WATCHMAN Heart Device Gives Patients Alternative to Blood Thinners and Reduces Stroke Risk

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MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute at MedStar Washington Hospital Center was the first hospital in the Washington metropolitan region to implant the newly approved WATCHMAN™ Device. The new device is designed to prevent stroke in high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation who are seeking an alternative to blood-thinning medication. Blood thinners are effective in reducing the risk of stroke for patients with A-fib, but many cannot tolerate these medications because of the risk of bleeding. The WATCHMAN device, which resembles a tiny umbrella, is used to close off a pouch on the left side of the heart, which is believed to be the source of the majority of stroke-causing blood clots.

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New Guidelines Recommend Stent Devices to Fight Strokes in Certain Patients

New devices called stent retrievers are enabling physicians to stop strokes in their tracks. For the first time, new guidelines from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommend the treatment for certain stroke patients.