Feature Channels:

Cardiovascular Health

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

ventricular tachycardia, Radiation Therapy

Deadly Heart Rhythm Halted by Noninvasive Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy — aimed directly at the heart — can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. They treated five patients with irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachycardia, who had not responded to standard treatments. The therapy resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes.

Medicine

Channels:

heart failure, heart assist device, cardiomyopathy, gene expression, risk prediction

Genomic Blood Test Predicts Survival Rates After Surgery for Advanced Heart Failure

MDeng_27937_1.usethisone.jpg

An experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices.

Medicine

Channels:

MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI technology, Inflammatory Diseases, Heart, Heart Disease, Doctors, Disorders, Technology, Biomedical Engineering, Nanoparticle, MRI scan, Inflammation, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton

New MRI Technology Could Help Doctors Detect Heart Disease, Other Inflammatory Diseases with Better Accuracy

20130801_doiron13_jwc.jpg

Doctors might be able to better detect any disease or disorder that involves inflammation thanks to a new MRI imaging technology co-developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Medicine

Channels:

Diabetes, Diabetes and Adults, Diabetes Research, Congenital Heart Defect, Congenital Heart Defects, congenital heart abnormalities, Pregnancy, Pregnancy and Diabetes, stem cells and diabetes, Stem Cell Biology, Stem Cells

Research Reveals How Diabetes in Pregnancy Affects Baby’s Heart

heartcellsaffectedbyglucose_800x533.jpg

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels - whether caused by diabetes or other factors - keep heart cells from maturing normally. Their findings help explain why babies born to women with diabetes are more likely to develop congenital heart disease.

Medicine

Channels:

Lymphoma, Physical Activity, Survival, Medical Research

Increasing Physical Activity Improves Survival in Lymphoma Patients, Mayo Researchers Say

An observational study by researchers at Mayo Clinic has found that increasing physical activity not only decreased the risk of death from all causes but also decreased the risk of death specifically from lymphoma.

Medicine

Channels:

Heart Transplant, NYU Langone Health, Heart Failure, Transplant Institute

New Heart Transplant Program Launched at NYU Langone Health

nader-moazami-hero-crop.jpg

NYU Langone launches a new heart transplant program.

Medicine

Channels:

EMS, Hospital, Heart Attack

Coordinated Emergency Care Improves Survival for Patients with Heart Attacks

DukeHealth-STEMI.jpg

Large national study shows the life-saving potential of coordinating EMS, hospital responses

Medicine

Channels:

Obesity, Cardio Vascular Disease

“Obesity Paradox” Not Found When Measuring New Cases of Cardiovascular Disease

A new study by NYU College of Global Public Health and the University of Michigan finds that the “obesity paradox” is not present among people with new cases of cardiovascular disease.

Medicine

Channels:

Physiology, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, Childhood Trauma, early-life stress, Kidney Function, Immune System

Early-Life Trauma May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Adults

Stress in early life may change the immune response in the kidneys, increasing the risk of heart disease later in life, according to a new study.

Medicine

Channels:

ECG interpretation , NBA, Cardiology, JAMA, JAMA Cardiology, Basketball, Guidelines, National Basketball Association

Study of Electrocardiogram Readings in National Basketball Association (NBA) Players Highlights Value of Sport-Specific Normative Data and Guidelines

Study of Electrocardiogram Readings in National Basketball Association (NBA) Players Highlights Value of Sport-Specific Normative Data and Guidelines. The findings were published on Dec. 6 in JAMA Cardiology.







Chat now!