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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 16-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 16-Sep-2014 4:00 PM EDT

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A New Way to Look at Diabetes and Heart Risk

People with diabetes who appear otherwise healthy may have a six-fold higher risk of developing heart failure regardless of their cholesterol levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

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Raising Awareness for Atrial Fibrillation

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Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart arrhythmia in the United States, affecting between 3-4 million people and numbers are expected to increase by the year 2050 to 12 million to 14 million. Although widely unknown to the general public, atrial fibrillation or AFib needs to be taken seriously. It increases the risk of stroke by as much as five times and can contribute to heart failure and other heart conditions. Because of this reason, Dr. Eric Rashba, Director, Heart Rhythm Center, Stony Brook University Heart Institute, is raising awareness about this condition in hopes to get patients’ hearts back in rhythm.

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Oxidized LDL Might Not Be the "Bad Guy" In the Development of Plaque Inside Artery Walls, Research Suggests

A team of investigators from the University of Kentucky has made a thought-provoking discovery about a type of cholesterol previously believed to be a "bad guy" in the development of heart disease and other conditions.

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Leaky Gut — A Source of Non-AIDS Complications in HIV-Positive Patients

HIV infection is no longer a fatal condition, thanks to newer antiretroviral medications, but a phenomenon has surfaced among these patients — non-AIDS complications. Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine scientists have resolved the mystery, discovering the leaky gut as the offender.

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Professors Provide Most Updated Information on Aspirin in the Prevention of a First Heart Attack

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Professors from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Arizona have published an article emphasizing that the evidence in treatment indicates that all patients having a heart attack or who have survived a prior event should be given aspirin. In healthy individuals, however, they state that any decision to prescribe aspirin should be an individual clinical judgment by the healthcare provider that weighs the absolute benefit in reducing the risk of a first heart against the absolute risk of major bleeding.

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Study Links Sex Hormone Levels in the Blood to Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Measuring the levels of sex hormones in patients’ blood may identify patients likely to suffer a sudden cardiac arrest, a heart rhythm disorder that is fatal in 95 percent of patients.

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New Polypill Increases Heart Attack Patients’ Medication Adherence

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New research shows a novel polypill increases patient adherence to treatment following a myocardial infarction (MI) or heart attack, according to new study results reported at the European Society of Cardiology’s ESC Congress 2014 in Barcelona, Spain by Principal Investigator Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD.

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Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk of Subsequent Event

In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA.

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