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Inhibiting Inflammatory Enzyme After Heart Attack Does Not Reduce Risk of Subsequent Event

In patients who experienced an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event (such as heart attack or unstable angina), use of the drug darapladib to inhibit the enzyme lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (believed to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis) did not reduce the risk of recurrent major coronary events, according to a study published by JAMA.

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Researchers Identify Five Medical Conditions That May Contribute to Sudden Unexpected Death in North Carolina

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A new study – the first to be released by UNC researchers in the SUDDEN study – finds the five highest comorbidities of sudden unexpected death in North Carolina are hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, and cardiomyopathy.

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World Study Shows Better Health Care as Important as Controlling Risk Factors for Heart Health

The research shows that for better heart health, rich countries should continue to deliver high quality health care while trying to reduce risk factors, while poor countries need to avoid the rise of risk factors but also substantially improve their health care.

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Protein in ‘Good Cholesterol’ May Be a Key to Treating Pulmonary Hypertension

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Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. Using a rodent model, the researchers showed that a peptide mimicking part of the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the so-called “good” cholesterol, may help reduce the production of oxidized lipids in pulmonary hypertension. They also found that reducing the amount of oxidized lipids improved the rodents’ heart and lung function.

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Hypertension Self-Management Program Helps Reduce BP For High-Risk Patients

Among patients with hypertension at high risk of cardiovascular disease, a program that consisted of patients measuring their blood pressure and adjusting their antihypertensive medication accordingly resulted in lower systolic blood pressure at 12 months compared to patients who received usual care, according to a study in the August 27 issue of JAMA.

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Train Your Heart to Protect Your Mind

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Exercising to improve our cardiovascular strength may protect us from cognitive impairment as we age, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated Institut universitaire de gératrie de Montréal Research Centre.

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Black Carbon – a Major Climate Pollutant –Also Linked to Cardiovascular Health

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Black carbon pollutants from wood smoke are known to trap heat near the earth’s surface and warm the climate. A new study led by McGill Professor Jill Baumgartner suggests that black carbon may also increase women’s risk of cardiovascular disease.

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Study Challenges Controversial Blood Pressure Targets for Older Patients

A new study led by researchers in the Cardiac and Vascular Institute at NYU Langone Medical Center found that current blood pressure recommendations for people aged 60 years and older who suffer from coronary artery disease (CAD) may not be optimal compared to the previous guidelines. The findings, based on analysis of more than 8,000 patient records, appear in the August 18 online issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).

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New Study First to Examine Quality of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs in Canada

The quality of cardiac rehabilitation programs across Canada is strong, with specific criteria areas now identified as requiring further enhancement to improve patient outcomes, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, York University and UHN.

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Implantable Heart Devices Result in Similar Survival Benefits Among Ethnic, Racial Groups

Racial and ethnic minorities who receive implantable devices to treat heart failure derive the same substantial survival benefit from these therapies as white patients, new UCLA-led research shows. While national heart organizations recommend use of these devices for all eligible patients, minorities have not been well represented in clinical device trials, and previous studies had shown that African American and Hispanic patients are less likely to receive these recommended therapies. Researchers note that the current study’s findings are a reminder to physicians and patients that this proven life-extending therapy should be offered to all eligible heart failure patients without regard for race or ethnicity.

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