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  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2018 1:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 694423

CPAP May Reduce Resting Heart Rate in Prediabetic Patients

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Patients with prediabetes who also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may improve their resting heart rate, an important measure of cardiovascular health, by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat their OSA, according to a randomized, controlled trial presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference.

Released:
11-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694841

New Algorithm More Accurately Predicts Life Expectancy After Heart Failure

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new algorithm more accurately predicts which people will survive heart failure, and for how long, whether or not they receive a heart transplant. The algorithm would allow doctors to make more personalized assessments of people who are awaiting heart transplants, which in turn could enable health care providers to make better use of limited life-saving resources and potentially reduce health care costs.

Released:
18-May-2018 7:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694828

Simpler Scan Still Effective in Deciding Stroke Treatment

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A study led by a neurologist from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) showed that a computed tomography (CT scan) could be sufficient for determining thrombectomy treatment in stroke.

Released:
18-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694509

Researchers Operate Lab-Grown Heart Cells by Remote Control

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command — simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes.

Released:
14-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694530

Cardiomyopathy Mutation Reduces Heart’s Ability to Vary Pumping Force, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart’s normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694792

EMS Providers Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year Using Newer Breathing Tube

University of Alabama at Birmingham

A new study compared EMS use of endotracheal intubation versus a laryngeal tube for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Results indicate increased survival rates with use of the laryngeal tube.

Released:
17-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 5:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694393

Acute Kidney Injury During Hospitalization Linked with Higher Risk of Heart Failure after Discharge

American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Among hospitalized adults, those who experienced acute kidney injury were 44% more likely to be hospitalized for heart failure in the year after discharge.

Released:
11-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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Article ID: 694668

UTHealth Researcher Reveals Results of Study on Emergency Breathing Tubes

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

In a landmark study, researchers found that patients treated with paramedic oxygen delivery using a newer, more flexible laryngeal breathing tube may have a greater survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest than the traditional intubation breathing tube.

Released:
16-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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