Self-Powered Sensors to Monitor Nuclear Fuel Rod Status

Released: 18-Oct-2012 10:00 AM EDT
Embargo expired: 23-Oct-2012 11:30 AM EDT
Source Newsroom: Acoustical Society of America (ASA)
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Citations 164th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America

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This research will be one of several topics presented in a webcast news briefing at 10:30 a.m. (CDT; 11:30 a.m. EDT) on Tuesday, Oct. 23. Reporters may register for the webcast here: www.aipwebcasting.com
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Newswise — Japan’s Fukushima Dai’ichi nuclear disaster that occurred in 2011 -- a result of the strongest earthquake on record in the country and the powerful tsunami waves it triggered -- underscored the need for a method to monitor the status of nuclear fuel rods that doesn’t rely on electrical power.

During the disaster, the electrical power connection to the nuclear reactor failed and rendered back-up electrical generators, coolant pumps, and sensor systems useless. The nuclear plant’s operators were unable to monitor the fuel rods in the reactor and spent fuel in the storage ponds.

To address this issue, Penn State researchers teamed with the Idaho National Laboratory to create a self-powered sensor capable of harnessing heat from nuclear reactors’ harsh operating environments to transmit data without electronic networks. The team will present their research at the Acoustical Society of America’s upcoming 164th Meeting, October 22-26, 2012, in Kansas City, Missouri.

“Thermoacoustics exploits the interaction between heat and sound waves,” explains Randall A. Ali, a graduate student studying acoustics at Penn State. “Thermoacoustic sensors can operate without moving parts and don’t require external power if a heat source, such as fuel in a nuclear reactor, is available.”

Thermoacoustic engines can be created from a closed cylindrical tube -- even a fuel rod -- and a passive structure called a “stack.”

“We used stacks made from a ceramic material with a regular array of parallel pores that’s manufactured as the substrate for catalytic converters found in many automotive exhaust systems. These stacks facilitate the transfer of heat to the gas in a resonator, and heat is converted to sound when there’s a temperature difference along the stack,” Ali elaborates.

When a thermoacoustic engine operates, an acoustically driven streaming gas jet circulates hot fluid away from the heat source -- nuclear fuel -- and along the walls of the engine and into the surrounding cooling fluid.

Penn State and Idaho National Laboratory are also investigating using thermoacoustic sound to monitor microstructural changes in nuclear fuel, measure gas mixture composition, and to act as a failsafe device in emergency situations.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE 164th ASA MEETING

The Kansas City Marriott Downtown Hotel is located at 200 West 12th Street, Kansas City, Missouri, 64105. The hotel main numbers are: 816-421-6800; fax: 816-855-4418.

USEFUL LINKS
Main meeting website: http://acousticalsociety.org/meetings/kansas_city
Meeting Abstract Database: http://asa.aip.org/asasearch.html
Hotel site: https://resweb.passkey.com/Resweb.do?mode=welcome_ei_new&eventID=8120158

WORLD WIDE PRESS ROOM
ASA's World Wide Press Room (www.acoustics.org/press) contains additional tips about newsworthy stories and with lay-language papers, which are 300-1200 word summaries of presentations written by scientists for a general audience and accompanied by photos, audio, and video.

PRESS REGISTRATION
ASA will grant free registration to credentialed full-time journalists and professional freelance journalists working on assignment for major news outlets. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, contact Charles E. Blue (cblue@aip.org, 301-209-3091), who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information.

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This news release was prepared for the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).

ABOUT THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is the premier international scientific society in acoustics devoted to the science and technology of sound. Its 7,000 members worldwide represent a broad spectrum of the study of acoustics. ASA publications include The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (the world's leading journal on acoustics), Acoustics Today magazine, ECHOES newsletter, books, and standards on acoustics. The Society also holds two major scientific meetings each year. For more information about ASA, visit our website at http://www.acousticalsociety.org.


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