Feature Channels:

Nuclear Power

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Self-Charging Fish Tags, A Promising Alternative to Silicon, Hints About Color of Extinct Animals, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

Channels:

World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector, What to Expect From the Coming Quantum Era and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Science

Channels:

nuclear analytics

National Nuclear Data Center Aims to Adapt to a Changing Landscape

D8680816.jpg

Since 1952, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has been home to a national resource whose existence is not widely known outside of its customer base: the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC), a user facility with a research mission. Alejandro Sonzogni, the new director of the NNDC, sees his mission as adapting the NNDC group’s activities to meet the changing needs of the nuclear community and spreading the word about the services the group offers.

Science

Channels:

Nuclear, Uranium Mining, Climate Change, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Nuclear Energy, Renewable Energy

Study Shows That Saskatchewan Uranium Mining Emits Few Greenhouse Gases

A research group from the University of Saskatchewan has found that the mining and milling of Canadian uranium contributes very few greenhouse gases to nuclear power’s already low emissions. The study, conducted by David Parker, a graduate student in the College of Engineering co-supervised by U of S professor emeritus Gordon Sparks and environmental engineer Cameron McNaughton, was published online in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Science

Channels:

Chemistry, Nuclear chemistry

FSU Chemistry Professor Explores Outer Regions of Periodic Table

IMG_1275.JPG

In the latest edition of the journal Science, Florida State University Professor Thomas Albrecht-Schmitt captures the fundamental chemistry of the element berkelium, or Bk on the periodic table.

Science

Channels:

nuclear detonation detection, Global Burst Detection system, GPS

Looking From Space for Nuclear Detonations

GBD.jpg

Sandia National Laboratories, which has been in the business of nuclear detonation detection for more than 50 years, is working on the next generation system.

Science

Channels:

Texas Tech University, Terrorism, Nuclear Weapons, helium-3, Applied Physics Letters, Department Of Homeland Security

Texas Tech Researchers Find Alternative for Nuclear Weapon Detection

A group of Texas Tech researchers report this week in Applied Physics Letters that they have developed an alternative material to the rare, expensive gas normally used for neutron detection. This material fulfills many key requirements for helium gas detector replacements and can serve as a low-cost alternative in the future.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Genetics, Nuclear Power, Cancer, Radiation, Nuclear Weapons, Hiroshima

Long-Term Health Effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Atomic Bombs Not as Dire as Public Perceives

The detonation of atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 resulted in horrific casualties and devastation. The long-term effects of radiation exposure also increased cancer rates in the survivors. But public perception of the rates of cancer and birth defects among survivors and their children is in fact greatly exaggerated when compared to the reality revealed by comprehensive follow-up studies. The reasons for this mismatch and its implications are discussed in a Perspectives review of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki survivor studies published in the August issue of the journal GENETICS, a publication of the Genetics Society of America.

Science

Channels:

Energy & Global Security, Nuclear Engineering, Energy, Nuclear Energy, Nuclear energy modeling & simulation, Reactors

Argonne to Work with Small Businesses on Nuclear Technologies

GAIN_Logo-2_Lines.jpg

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory will be working with four small businesses on nuclear technology projects under the auspices of DOE’s Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN). The projects will be funded through GAIN’s Nuclear Energy Voucher pilot program, which is providing up to $2 million to assist new entrants into the nuclear field as they build the collaborations necessary to accelerate the development and deployment of innovative nuclear technologies.

Science

Channels:

Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Power, radioactive waste, nuclear fuel reprocessing, Energy, Geosciences, Xenon

Activity of a New Synthetic Compound May Be Key to Cleaner Nuclear Energy

MolecularImage2.jpg

An international team of researchers has discovered a new synthetic compound that acts to adsorb Xenon, an element and volatile radioactive waste commonly released by nuclear energy plants.

Science

Channels:

nuclear fuel reprocessing, Xenon, krypton, Nuclear Energy, Metal Organic Frameworks, noble gases

New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

MofPhoto.jpg

Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing more efficiently than today’s technology. The metal-organic framework captures gases at ambient temperature, eliminating an energy-intensive step.

Science

Channels:

Chemistry & Materials, environmental remediation, Computational Chemistry

New Material Has Potential to Cut Costs and Make Nuclear Fuel Recycling Cleaner

CaSDB_perspective.png

Researchers are investigating a new material that might help in nuclear fuel recycling and waste reduction by capturing certain gases released during reprocessing. Conventional technologies to remove these radioactive gases operate at extremely low, energy-intensive temperatures. By working at ambient temperature, the new material has the potential to save energy, make reprocessing cleaner and less expensive. The reclaimed materials can also be reused commercially.

Science

Channels:

Fusion, tokamaks, plasma physics, Nuclear Energy, National Spherical Torus Experiment—Upgrade

Physicists Steven Sabbagh and Jack Berkery Receive 2016 Landau-Spitzer Award

SabbaghBerkery.jpg

Article describes winners of the 2016 Landau-Spitzer Award and the nature of their research.

Science

Channels:

High-speed Camera, Explosions, high-fidelity imaging, pyrometry, mapping techniques, K.L. McNesby, B.E. Homan, R.A. Benjamin, V.M. Boyle Sr., J.M. Densmore, M.M. Biss, army research laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory

U.S. Army Camera Captures Explosives in Fine Detail

RSI-McNesby-detonation.jpg

While it's possible to study explosives, sans explosives, new techniques involving high-speed, high-fidelity imaging with optical filtering and signal processing techniques have recently made setting off explosives and capturing the data in real-time a reasonable alternative to developing a new simulation. Researchers report their findings this week in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments.

Science

Channels:

Radiation, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley Lab, fukushima, Education, UC Berkeley, University Of California At Berkeley, Berkeley, background radiation, Schools, Environment, Environmental, Detector

Radiation 101: DoseNet Delivers Environmental Data as an Educational Tool

XBD201604-00164-05.jpg

DoseNet, a radiation-monitoring outreach project supported by Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, has a broad aim to inform and connect students and communities using science and data.

Science

Channels:

Foreign Affairs, President Obama Asia trip

A Final Statement on Nuclear Weapons and a Frightening Future for Foreign Affairs

RichardMansbach.jpg

An Iowa State University political scientist says President Obama’s trip to Hiroshima is significant for the point it makes about the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Richard Mansbach also explains why this presidential election has him frightened about future U.S. foreign affairs.

Science

Channels:

Towards Decommissioning Fukushima: 'Seeing' Boron Distribution in Molten Debris

115661_web.jpg

Decommissioning the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant just got one step closer. Japanese researchers have mapped the distribution of boron compounds in a model control rod, paving the way for determining re-criticality risk within the reactor.

Medicine

Channels:

Top Stories 5-17-2016

click to view today's top stories

Medicine

Science

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Top Stories 5-16-2016

click to view today's top stories

Medicine

Science

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Top Stories 5-13-2016

click to see today's top stories







Chat now!