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High-Energy Shock Waves, Plasma Behavior, Algae Production, and More in the DOE Science News Source

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Nuclear Testing, Fallout, Radiation, radioactive fall-out, Iodine 131

The Devastating Effects of Nuclear Weapon Testing

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The University of Utah’s J. Marriott Library created an interactive, geospatial archive depicting the story of Utah radioactive fallout related to atmospheric nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site.

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Researchers Create First Low-Energy Particle Accelerator Beam Underground in the United States

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A team of Notre Dame researchers are working in collaboration with researchers from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology and the Colorado School of Mines.

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Lithium, fusion energy, Nuclear Energy, plasma physics, Plasma-facing materials

PPPL Researchers Demonstrate First Hot Plasma Edge in a Fusion Facility

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Article describes first experimental finding of constant temperature throughout a fusion plasma.

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Dance of the Supermassive Black Holes, Delving into Dark Energy, A Dead Disk Galaxy, and More in the Space News Source

The latest in space and astronomy in the Space News Source

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Scintillators, Nuclear Nonproliferation, Neutron detector

Bright Thinking Leads to Breakthrough in Nuclear Threat Detection Science

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Taking inspiration from an unusual source, a Sandia National Laboratories team has dramatically improved the science of scintillators — objects that detect nuclear threats. According to the team, using organic glass scintillators could soon make it even harder to smuggle nuclear materials through America’s ports and borders.

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Scientific Computing, ATLAS Collaboration, ATLAS experiment, Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics, Petabyte, petabyte data, Scientific Data, PHENIX Experiment, Star Experiment, Large Hadron Collider, high-performance computing , Tape Drives, Data Storage, Big Data

Brookhaven Lab's Scientific Data and Computing Center Reaches 100 Petabytes of Recorded Data

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The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and ATLAS Computing Facility (RACF) Mass Storage Service—part of the Scientific Data and Computing Center (SDCC) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory—now records 100 petabytes of data reflecting nearly two decades of physics research.

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Nuclear Nonproliferation, Nonproliferation

Sandia Method Supports Real-Time Warhead Verification Without Revealing Design Data

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Sandia National Laboratories physicist Peter Marleau has developed a new method for verifying warhead attributes. Called CONFIDANTE, for CONfirmation using a Fast-neutron Imaging Detector with Anti-image Null-positive Time Encoding, the method could help address the problem of conducting verification measurements while simultaneously protecting sensitive design information.

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Tonopah, test range, non-nuclear testing

Upgrades at Sandia’s Tonopah Test Range Help Weapons Testing

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It’s been a challenge for Sandia National Laboratories' Tonopah Test Range to keep decades-old equipment running while gathering detailed information required for 21st century non-nuclear testing. The Nevada test range has changed the analog brains in instruments to digital, moved to modern communications systems, and upgraded telemetry and tracking equipment and computing systems.

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Electrons, low-energy electron, Atomic, Molecular, aerosol overlayer method, aerosol droplets, Stavros Amanatidis, Bruce Yoder, Ruth Signorell, ETH Zurich

Shining Light on Low-Energy Electrons

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The classic method for studying how electrons interact with matter is by analyzing their scattering through thin layers of a known substance. This happens by directing a stream of electrons at the layer and analyzing the subsequent deviations in the electrons’ trajectories. But researchers in Switzerland have devised a way to examine the movement of low-energy electrons that can adversely impact electronic systems and biological tissue. They discuss this in this week’s The Journal of Chemical Physics.







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