Silent Stalkers of Dark Ocean Waters

Evidence that Killer Whales Can Hunt Marine Mammals at Night in Near Total Darkness Suggests the Animals Listen to Locate Prey

Released: 11/27/2013 8:00 AM EST
Embargo expired: 12/3/2013 2:00 PM EST
Source Newsroom: Acoustical Society of America (ASA)
Contact Information

Available for logged-in reporters only

Citations 166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America

Newswise — SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 27, 2013 – The mating roar of a male harbor seal is supposed to attract a partner, not a predator. Unfortunately for the seals, scientists have found evidence that marine-mammal-eating killer whales eavesdrop on their prey. The researchers will present their work at the 166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held Dec. 2 – 6 in San Francisco, Calif.

Previous research had shown mammal-eating killer whales are nearly silent before making a kill, neither vocalizing nor using their echolocation. The likely reason, says Volker Deecke, a researcher at the Centre for Wildlife Conservation at the University of Cumbria in the U.K., is the excellent hearing of the seals, porpoises, and other animals the whales stalk.

“If the mammal hunters just swam around clicking all the time, then all the prey would be warned,” he said. “It looks like the whales are using a stealth approach instead.”

While biologists had evidence that the whales do not echolocate while hunting, they were still unsure exactly how the animals do find their prey in the murky northern waters off the west coast of North America. To help answer that question Deecke and his colleagues traveled to Alaska and placed acoustic recording tags on 13 killer whales over the course of a two-year study.

The tags, which are about the size of a cell phone, were attached to the whales with four suction cups and could stay on for up to 16 hours. The tags’ accelerometers, compass, depth sensor, and hydrophone recorded data on the animals’ movements and any sounds it heard or made. Deecke and his colleagues were able to identify predation events by the characteristic sound of a whale dispatching its prey with a hit from its tail fluke.

After analyzing many hours of data, Deecke and his team found that killer whales were successfully locating prey even in near-complete darkness. Deecke notes that this new evidence of nighttime hunting rules out visual cues as the only means of prey detection.

“We now suspect that mammal-eating killer whales are primarily eavesdropping on sounds generated by their prey to find food,” he said. Deecke recounted one unfortunate seal whose demise was captured by the sensors in an acoustic story of life and death.

“As soon as we put one of the tags on, it started to record seal roars, which are part of the display that male harbor seals use to attract females. Over the next half-hour the roars got louder and louder, then there are a sequence of three quite loud roars that suggest the seal is within a few hundred meters of the killer whale. Twenty-seven seconds later there are the sounds of a predation event, and then no more roars.”

Deecke notes that such a story is compelling but does not provide direct evidence that killer whales are tuning in to the sounds of their prey. Going forward, he hopes to use playback experiments to test killer whales’ responses to recorded seal roars and porpoise echolocation clicks.

Finding out how much killer whales rely on acoustic cues to hunt could help scientists better understand the potential ecological impact of shipping noise and other activities that generate underwater sound. “We need to understand how the foraging process works so that we, as humans, can know how our behavior might impact the animals negatively and what we can do to minimize our impact,” Deecke said.

Presentation 2aAB10, “Killers in the dark – acoustic evidence for night-time predation by mammal-eating killer whales in Alaska,” will take place on Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013, at 11 a.m. PST. The abstract describing this work can be found here: http://asa2013.abstractcentral.com/planner.jsp.

###

ABOUT THE MEETING
The 166th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), to be held Dec. 2-6, 2013, at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square, will feature more than 1,100 presentations on sound and its applications in physics, engineering, and medicine. The meeting program can be accessed at: http://asa2013.abstractcentral.com/planner.jsp.

OTHER USEFUL LINKS
Main meeting website: http://acousticalsociety.org/meetings/san_francisco
Hotel site: http://www.sanfrancisco.hilton.com
ASA World Wide Press Room: http://www.acoustics.org/press

WORLD WIDE PRESS ROOM
ASA's World Wide Press Room (www.acoustics.org/press) will feature dozens of newsworthy stories through lay-language papers, which are 300-1200 word summaries of presentations written by scientists for a general audience and accompanied by photos, audio, and video.

PRESS REGISTRATION
We will grant free registration to credentialed journalists and professional freelance journalists. If you are a reporter and would like to attend, contact Jason Bardi (jbardi@aip.org, 240-535-4954), who can also help with setting up interviews and obtaining images, sound clips, or background information.

LIVE MEDIA WEBCAST
A press briefing featuring a selection of newsworthy research will be webcast live from the conference. Date and time to be announced. To register, visit www.aipwebcasting.com.

****************************
ABOUT THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA
The Acoustical Society of America (ASA) is the premier international scientific society in acoustics devoted to the science and technology of sound. Its 7,000 members worldwide represent a broad spectrum of the study of acoustics. ASA publications include The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (the world's leading journal on acoustics), Acoustics Today magazine, ECHOES newsletter, books, and standards on acoustics. The society also holds two major scientific meetings each year. For more information about ASA, visit our website at http://www.acousticalsociety.org.

This news release was prepared for the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) by the American Institute of Physics (AIP).


Comment/Share