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Newswise: New Science Behind Algae-based Flip-flops
Released: 6-Aug-2020 2:35 PM EDT
New Science Behind Algae-based Flip-flops
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers formulated polyurethane foams, made from algae oil, to meet commercial specifications for midsole shoes and the foot-bed of flip-flops. Their latest result, in a series of recent research publications, offers a complete solution to the plastics problem—at least for polyurethanes.

Newswise: UIC physicist earns innovation award from Microscopy Today
Released: 5-Aug-2020 5:15 PM EDT
UIC physicist earns innovation award from Microscopy Today
University of Illinois at Chicago

Groundbreaking approach in high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy has been judged to be one of the 10 best microscopy innovations in the 2020 Microscopy Today Innovation Award competition.

Newswise: Promising new research identifies innovative approach for controlling defects in 3D printing
Released: 5-Aug-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Promising new research identifies innovative approach for controlling defects in 3D printing
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne scientists use temperature data to tune — and fix — defects in 3D-printed metallic parts.

Newswise: Helping protect medical professionals
Released: 5-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Helping protect medical professionals
Sandia National Laboratories

A media comprised of a sandwich of materials, tested by Sandia National Laboratories, is being manufactured into N95-like respirators that could be used in local medical facilities. The project originated from the urgent need for personal protective equipment when the COVID-19 outbreak began.

Released: 5-Aug-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Incorporating Solar Harvesting Into the Side of Buildings Could Enhance Energy Sustainability
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

If builders could incorporate solar harvesting into the siding of a building, the amount of energy from the grid that a structure would need may significantly decrease. In research published recently in Renewable Energy, a team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, led by Diana-Andra Borca-Tasciuc, a professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, demonstrated the potential of wedge-shaped luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). These efficient modular solar units could easily be hung on the side of a building.

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Embargo will expire: 11-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2020 10:05 AM EDT

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Newswise:Video Embedded warwick-moto-s-electric-superbike-build-racing-ahead-despite-lockdown
VIDEO
Released: 5-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Warwick Moto’s electric superbike build racing ahead despite lockdown
University of Warwick

A team of 25 students who formed Warwick Moto are designing, building and developing an electric superbike which was due to race this summer

Newswise: Geothermal Brines Could Propel California’s Green Economy
Released: 5-Aug-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Geothermal Brines Could Propel California’s Green Economy
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Deep beneath the surface of the Salton Sea, a shallow lake in California’s Imperial County, sits an immense reserve of critical metals that, if unlocked, could power the state’s green economy for years to come. These naturally occurring metals are dissolved in geothermal brine, a byproduct of geothermal energy production. Now the race is on to develop technology to efficiently extract one of the most valuable metals from the brine produced by the geothermal plants near the Salton Sea: lithium.

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Released: 4-Aug-2020 5:35 PM EDT
New study shows how infrared lasers destroy harmful protein aggregates in Alzheimer's
Tokyo University of Science

A notable characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is the formation of harmful plaques that contain aggregates--also known as fibrils--of amyloid proteins.

Newswise: Ultrafast lasers probe elusive chemistry at the liquid-liquid interface
Released: 4-Aug-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Ultrafast lasers probe elusive chemistry at the liquid-liquid interface
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Real-time measurements captured by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory provide missing insight into chemical separations to recover cobalt, a critical raw material used to make batteries and magnets for modern technologies.

Newswise: Machine Learning Probes 3D Microstructures
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Machine Learning Probes 3D Microstructures
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have developed a machine learning technique for materials research at the atomic and molecular scales. The technique visualizes and quantifies the atomic and molecular structures in three-dimensional samples in real time. It is designed primarily to identify and characterize microstructures in 3D samples.

Newswise: Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion

Newswise: Cementing the future
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Cementing the future
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source and Center for Nanoscale Materials are utilizing nano- and micro-scale imaging to better understand the chemical processes behind the formation of cement.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

In a paper published this week in the journal Physical Review A, the researchers lay out a theoretical scenario in which two players, playing cooperatively against the dealer, can better coordinate their strategies using a quantumly entangled pair of systems.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral
Cornell University

Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

Newswise: Magnum Venus Products licenses ORNL co-developed additive manufacturing technologies
Released: 31-Jul-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Magnum Venus Products licenses ORNL co-developed additive manufacturing technologies
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has licensed two additive manufacturing-related technologies that aim to streamline and ramp up production processes to Knoxville-based Magnum Venus Products, Inc., a global manufacturer of fluid movement and product solutions for industrial applications in composites and adhesives.

Newswise: Safer, longer-lasting energy storage requires focus on interface of advanced materials
Released: 31-Jul-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Safer, longer-lasting energy storage requires focus on interface of advanced materials
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

More studies at the interface of battery materials, along with increased knowledge of the processes at work, are unleashing a surge of knowledge needed to more quickly address the demand for longer-lasting portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage for the electric grid.

Released: 31-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Physicists Find Misaligned Carbon Sheets Yield Unparalleled Properties
University of Texas at Dallas

A material composed of two one-atom-thick layers of carbon has grabbed the attention of physicists worldwide for its intriguing — and potentially exploitable — conductive properties.

Newswise: Berkeley Lab Part of Multi-Institutional Team Awarded $60M for Solar Fuels Research
Released: 31-Jul-2020 7:15 AM EDT
Berkeley Lab Part of Multi-Institutional Team Awarded $60M for Solar Fuels Research
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The Department of Energy has awarded $60 million to a new solar fuels initiative – called the Liquid Sunlight Alliance (LiSA) – led by Caltech in close partnership with Berkeley Lab. LiSA will build on the foundational work of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP).

Newswise: ‘Fool’s Gold’ May Be Valuable After All
Released: 30-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
‘Fool’s Gold’ May Be Valuable After All
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

University of Minnesota researchers have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as “fool’s gold,” into a magnetic material that could be the first step in creating valuable new materials for more energy-efficient computer memory devices.

Newswise: Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments
Released: 29-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A multi-institution team has used positron beams to probe the nature of radiation effects, providing new insight into how damage is produced in iron films.

Newswise: Argonne and Sentient Science develop game-changing computer modeling program to improve discovery and design of new materials
Released: 29-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Argonne and Sentient Science develop game-changing computer modeling program to improve discovery and design of new materials
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers collaborated to create a software program to accelerate discovery and design of new materials for applications allowing for a far more comprehensive understanding of materials from atomistic to mesoscopic scale than ever before.

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Released: 29-Jul-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Robert Ainsworth awarded $2.5 million to improve particle beams for high-intensity experiments
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Fermilab scientist Robert Ainsworth has won a $2.5 million Department of Energy Early Career Research Award to study different ways of ensuring stability in high-intensity proton beams. By studying how certain types of beam instabilities emerge and evolve under different conditions, his team can help sharpen scientists' methods for correcting them or avoiding them to begin with.

Released: 29-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
AIP Welcomes Nominations for 2020 Tate Medal for International Leadership
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

The American Institute of Physics is accepting nominations for the 2020 John Torrence Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics. The deadline to apply is Oct. 1, 2020. The Tate medal was established in 1959 and is awarded every two years to non-U.S. citizens for their leadership, research contributions and service to the international physics community. The award consists of a certificate of recognition, a bronze medal and a $10,000 prize.

Newswise: New Advances in Superconductivity
Released: 29-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
New Advances in Superconductivity
Penn State Materials Research Institute

The goal of room temperature superconductivity took a small step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists.

Newswise: Visual analytics tool plucks elusive patterns from elaborate datasets
Released: 28-Jul-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Visual analytics tool plucks elusive patterns from elaborate datasets
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

An ORNL team developed CrossVis, an open-source, customizable visual analytics system that analyzes numerical, categorical and image-based data while providing multiple dynamic, coordinated views of these and other data types.

Newswise: Solving materials problems with a quantum computer
Released: 28-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Solving materials problems with a quantum computer
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists at Argonne and the University of Chicago have developed a method paving the way to using quantum computers to simulate realistic molecules and complex materials. They tested the method on a quantum simulator and IBM quantum computer.

Released: 28-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Metal-Breathing Bacteria Could Transform Electronics, Biosensors, and More
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

When the Shewanella oneidensis bacterium “breathes” in certain metal and sulfur compounds anaerobically, the way an aerobic organism would process oxygen, it produces materials that could be used to enhance electronics, electrochemical energy storage, and drug-delivery devices. The ability of this bacterium to produce molybdenum disulfide — a material that is able to transfer electrons easily, like graphene — is the focus of research published in Biointerphases by a team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Newswise: Black Phosphorus Future in 3D Analysis, Molecular Fingerprinting
22-Jul-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Black Phosphorus Future in 3D Analysis, Molecular Fingerprinting
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Many compact systems using mid-infrared technology continue to face compatibility issues when integrating with conventional electronics. Black phosphorus has garnered attention for overcoming these challenges thanks to a wide variety of uses in photonic circuits. Research published in Applied Physics Reviews highlights the material’s potential for emerging devices ranging from medical imaging to environment monitoring, assessing progress in different components of the chips, from light detection to laser emission.

Newswise: New Research in Origami Metamaterials Promises Wide Implications
Released: 27-Jul-2020 5:35 PM EDT
New Research in Origami Metamaterials Promises Wide Implications
Georgia Institute of Technology

New research by the Georgia Institute of Technology and Northwestern Engineering expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.

Newswise:Video Embedded laser-inversion-enables-multi-materials-3d-printing
VIDEO
Released: 27-Jul-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Laser Inversion enables Multi-Materials 3D Printing
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time. Columbia engineers have used their expertise in robotics to develop a new approach to overcome this limitation: By inverting the laser so that it points upwards, they’ve invented a way to enable SLS to use—at the same time—multiple materials.

Newswise: Redesigning lithium-ion battery anodes for better performance
Released: 27-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Redesigning lithium-ion battery anodes for better performance
Argonne National Laboratory

In a new study, a team led by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory has made discoveries concerning a potential new, higher-capacity anode material, which would allow lithium-ion batteries to have a higher overall energy capacity.

Newswise: Young Investigator
Released: 27-Jul-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Young Investigator
University of Delaware

Tingyi Gu, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Delaware, has been selected for the Army Research Office Young Investigator Program. This prestigious award goes to early-career researchers pursuing fundamental research in areas relevant to the Army. Gu is studying materials that exploit the interface between light and electronics for potential use in lasers, displays, memory and more.

Released: 27-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure
Ohio State University

Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can’t handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates.

Released: 27-Jul-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Tiny titanium wields great power to shape crystals
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

Researchers from MIPT and their colleagues from Ural Federal University have combined optical and acoustic approaches and found that incorporating titanium atoms into barium hexaferrite leads to an unexpected substructure forming in the crystal lattice. The resulting material is promising for ultrafast computer memory applications. The findings were published in Scientific Reports.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Department of Energy Names Three Office of Science Distinguished Scientists Fellows
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) named three National Laboratory scientists as DOE Office of Science Distinguished Scientists Fellows

Newswise: Two construction projects reach major milestones at Fermilab
Released: 22-Jul-2020 6:15 PM EDT
Two construction projects reach major milestones at Fermilab
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Partners celebrate the site dedication of the Integrated Engineering Research Center and the groundbreaking for the PIP-II cryoplant building.

Newswise: Argonne breaks ground on new state-of-the-art beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source
Released: 22-Jul-2020 6:10 PM EDT
Argonne breaks ground on new state-of-the-art beamlines for the Advanced Photon Source
Argonne National Laboratory

In a ceremony at Argonne, leaders from the Department of Energy joined the lab in breaking ground on two new beamlines that will enable new innovations in many different scientific fields.

Newswise:Video Embedded pioneering-materials-scientist-james-de-yoreo-receives-distinguished-scientist-fellow-award
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Pioneering Materials Scientist James De Yoreo Receives Distinguished Scientist Fellow Award
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Pioneering materials scientist James De Yoreo receives Distinguished Scientist Fellow award. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science bestows one of its highest honors on PNNL materials scientist.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 10:55 AM EDT
COVID-19 shutdown led to increased solar power output
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

As the Covid-19 shutdowns and stay-at-home orders brought much of the world's travel and commerce to a standstill, people around the world started noticing clearer skies as a result of lower levels of air pollution.

Newswise: Lithium Ion Battery Waste Used in Biodiesel Production from Discarded Vegetable Oil
17-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Lithium Ion Battery Waste Used in Biodiesel Production from Discarded Vegetable Oil
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Brazilian researchers demonstrated a new chemical approach for producing biodiesel from domestic cooking oil waste by using hydroxide lithium mixed with either sodium hydroxides or potassium hydroxides as catalysts. Their work, published in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, could enable future studies related to the use of lithium from waste lithium ion batteries. The work marks one of the first times lithium has been used for such purposes.

Newswise: Fluorine recycling for lithium-ion batteries
Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:15 AM EDT
Fluorine recycling for lithium-ion batteries
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Lithium-ion batteries contain salts rich in fluorine, which decompose in humid air to toxic, highly corrosive hydrogen fluoride. The hazardous nature of this substance makes recycling more difficult and more expensive. A research project entitled "Fluoribat" is now being launched at Empa to solve this problem. This could help to make the life cycle of a rechargeable battery less expensive and at the same time safer.

Newswise: Researchers discover new chemistry of 2-D transition metal carbides and carbonitrides (MXenes)
Released: 20-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers discover new chemistry of 2-D transition metal carbides and carbonitrides (MXenes)
Missouri University of Science and Technology

A new finding about the fundamental chemistry of two-dimensional materials called MXenes will change the way researchers work with them, and open up new areas of applications, according to researchers at Missouri S&T.MXenes are ceramics that make up one of the largest families of 2-D conductive materials. Their conductivity makes them candidates for use in energy storage, sensing and optoelectronics.

Newswise: SLAC’s upgraded X-ray laser facility produces first light
Released: 20-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
SLAC’s upgraded X-ray laser facility produces first light
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

The LCLS-II upgrade project will increase the X-ray laser's power by thousands of times, producing a million pulses per second compared to 120 per second today. Now, the first phase of the upgrade has come into operation, producing an X-ray beam for the first time using newly installed undulators. The full upgrade is due to be completed within the next two years.

Newswise: Battery Breakthrough Gives Boost to Electric Flight and Long-Range Electric Cars
Released: 20-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Battery Breakthrough Gives Boost to Electric Flight and Long-Range Electric Cars
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers at Berkeley Lab, in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University, have developed a new battery material that could enable long-range electric vehicles that can drive for hundreds of miles on a single charge, and electric planes called eVTOLs for fast, environmentally friendly commutes.

Newswise: Atomtronic device could probe boundary between quantum, everyday worlds
Released: 17-Jul-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Atomtronic device could probe boundary between quantum, everyday worlds
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world we experience every day.

Newswise: The Secret to Renewable Solar Fuels is an Off-and-On Again Relationship
Released: 17-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
The Secret to Renewable Solar Fuels is an Off-and-On Again Relationship
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Copper that was once bound with oxygen is better at converting carbon dioxide into renewable fuels than copper that was never bound to oxygen, according to scientists at Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

Newswise: Predicting X-ray Absorption Spectra from Graphs
Released: 16-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Predicting X-ray Absorption Spectra from Graphs
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists built a machine learning model that can rapidly predict how atoms absorb x-rays for materials science research.

Released: 16-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Woven on-skin interfaces could allow clothing to communicate with smart technology
Cornell University

What if your clothing expressed your personality or culture – and could communicate with your cellphone or smart home?

Newswise: Facemask Fabric Filtration Efficiency
Released: 16-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Facemask Fabric Filtration Efficiency
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have completed an important and timely study of cloth masks. The study examined the filtration efficiency of fabrics and focused on aerosol particles in a range of sizes relevant to viral transmission through respiratory exposures. The best-performing masks used hybrid designs that include high thread-count cotton and electrostatic layers such as silk or polyester chiffon.


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