Feature Channels: Materials Science

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Newswise: Superconductivity and Charge Density Waves Caught Intertwining at the Nanoscale
Released: 20-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Superconductivity and Charge Density Waves Caught Intertwining at the Nanoscale
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists discover superconductivity and charge density waves are intrinsically interconnected at the nanoscopic level, a new understanding that could help lead to the next generation of electronics and computers.

Newswise: Recycling more precious metals from nuclear and electronic waste using the Picasso pigment, Prussian blue
Released: 19-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Recycling more precious metals from nuclear and electronic waste using the Picasso pigment, Prussian blue
Nagoya University

A big problem with the disposal of nuclear and electronic wastes is that the process wastes precious metals such as gold and platinum-group metals, which are key metals in computer chips.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-drone-for-ultrafast-transitions-between-air-and-water
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
A Drone for Ultrafast Transitions Between Air and Water
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

A new robot is capable of switching from an underwater drone to an aerial vehicle in less than one second. The robot also features a suction disc inspired by the remora fish, which enables it to hitchhike on wet or dry moving objects to significantly reduce its power consumption. It is designed for biological and environmental monitoring in marine ecosystems such as surveying ocean pollution in the open sea as the scientist of Beihang University, Imperial College London and Empa point out in a new study published in Science Robotics.

Newswise: Ultrahigh Piezoelectric Performance Demonstrated in Ceramic Materials
Released: 18-May-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Ultrahigh Piezoelectric Performance Demonstrated in Ceramic Materials
Penn State Materials Research Institute

The ability of piezoelectric materials to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa makes them useful for various applications from robotics to communication to sensors. A new design strategy for creating ultrahigh-performing piezoelectric ceramics opens the door to even more beneficial uses for these materials, according to a team of researchers from Penn State and Michigan Technological University.

Released: 18-May-2022 3:05 AM EDT
A Component for Brain-Inspired Computing
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Researchers from ETH Zurich, Empa and the University of Zurich have developed a new material for an electronic component that can be used in a wider range of applications than its predecessors. Such components will help create electronic circuits that emulate the human brain and that are more efficient than conventional computers at performing machine-learning tasks.

Released: 17-May-2022 1:30 PM EDT
How 3D-Printing Robots Could Power Greener Construction
Cornell University

A new 6,000-pound industrial robot at Cornell University can 3D print the kind of large-scale structures that could transform the construction industry, making it more efficient and sustainable by eliminating the waste of traditional material manufacturing.

Newswise: “Gold veins mined in the city” A technology to realize ‘urban mining’
Released: 17-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
“Gold veins mined in the city” A technology to realize ‘urban mining’
National Research Council of Science & Technology

In South Korea, which relies on imports for 99.3% of metal resources, the per capita consumption of metal resources is the highest in the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development), and consumption of precious metals in various industries such as renewable energy, healthcare, and semiconductors is increasing.

Newswise: New Silicon Nanowires Can Really Take the Heat
Released: 17-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
New Silicon Nanowires Can Really Take the Heat
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A Berkeley Lab-led research team has demonstrated an ultrathin silicon nanowire that conducts heat 150% more efficiently than conventional materials used in advanced chip technologies. The device could enable smaller, faster, energy-efficient microelectronics.

Newswise: AI for a Clean Energy Future: Researchers Use Machine Learning for Advanced Fuel Development
Released: 16-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
AI for a Clean Energy Future: Researchers Use Machine Learning for Advanced Fuel Development
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

Developing the nuclear power systems of the future requires innovative thinking and new approaches to solving complex challenges. For the first time, a team of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and University of Idaho researchers has successfully applied machine learning to characterizing the microstructure of metallic nuclear fuel, the fine details only visible under powerful magnification. The data collected through this technique will be used by engineers to predict fuel performance more accurately as they develop fuel for the next generation of nuclear power reactors.

Released: 13-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Ultrathin fuel cell uses the body’s own sugar to generate electricity
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Glucose is the sugar we absorb from the foods we eat. It is the fuel that powers every cell in our bodies. Could glucose also power tomorrow’s medical implants?

Newswise: Black Holes as Noise Traps
Released: 12-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Black Holes as Noise Traps
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Anyone who lives in an old building with wooden floors knows the problem: Even if the neighbors from above glide across the floor with graceful elegance, it sounds as if you were living under a bowling alley. Impact sound is a challenge even for the most modern wooden buildings. Scientists at Empa are now tinkering with a solution.

Newswise: Artificial Intelligence Agents Argue to Enhance the Speed of Materials Discovery
Released: 11-May-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Artificial Intelligence Agents Argue to Enhance the Speed of Materials Discovery
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI)-powered approach to analyzing X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. The X-ray Crystallography companion Agent (XCA) approach assembles a group of AIs that debate each other while analyzing live streaming X-ray data. Once the AIs cast their final votes, the XCA approach uses the vote tally to interpret what the most likely atomic structure is and to suggest how confident the researchers should be of the AI analysis. The AI analysis matches human effectiveness but takes just seconds.

Newswise: New research may revise a theory of reacting flow
Released: 10-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
New research may revise a theory of reacting flow
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

The research team of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) for the first time clearly demonstrates that the effect on the flow reverses according to the degree of change in the properties due to the reaction in a reacting flow with production of viscoelastic material, through experiments involving high-precision rheological measurements and a newly proposed theory.

Newswise: 2022-5-2-9396-2-hr.jpg
Released: 9-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Hidden Distortions Trigger Promising Thermoelectric Property
Brookhaven National Laboratory

In a paper just published in the journal Advanced Materials, a team of scientists from Northwestern University and Brookhaven National Laboratory describe the previously hidden sub-nanoscale origins of exceptional thermoelectric properties in silver gallium telluride. The discovery reveals a quantum mechanical twist on what drives the emergence of these properties—and opens up a completely new direction for searching for new high-performance thermoelectrics.

Newswise: Keeping Time With The Cosmos
Released: 9-May-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Keeping Time With The Cosmos
University of Tokyo

Various technologies, networks and institutions benefit from or require accurate time keeping to synchronize their activities. Current ways of synchronizing time have some drawbacks that a new proposed method seeks to address.

Released: 9-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Step Toward a Circular Economy?
Wiley

Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of the most common plastics. Discarded PET most often ends up in landfills or in the environment because the rate of recycling remains low.

Newswise: Novel cross phenomena theory could predict most effective materials
Released: 9-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Novel cross phenomena theory could predict most effective materials
Penn State Materials Research Institute

A novel theory of cross phenomena could be applied to predict whether a new material would be effective for use in various applications from improved medical ultrasounds to more efficient refrigerators, according to a Penn State researcher.  

Released: 9-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
The 2022 Society for Biomaterials, Technology Innovation and Development Award goes to Dr. Guillermo Ameer and the Acuitive Technologies Team
Acuitive Technologies

The honor recognizes biomaterials research that significantly benefits patient health and outcomes.

Newswise: Energy researchers invent chameleon metal that acts like many others
Released: 9-May-2022 6:00 AM EDT
Energy researchers invent chameleon metal that acts like many others
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A team of energy researchers led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities have invented a groundbreaking device that electronically converts one metal into behaving like another to use as a catalyst for speeding chemical reactions. The invention opens the door for new catalytic technologies using non-precious metal catalysts for important applications such as storing renewable energy, making renewable fuels, and manufacturing sustainable materials.

Newswise: Tulane Scientists Develop Powerful Family of Two-Dimensional Materials
Released: 6-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Tulane Scientists Develop Powerful Family of Two-Dimensional Materials
Tulane University

Researchers say the material have great potential for applications such as in advanced electronics and high-capacity batteries.

Newswise: Marek Urban Develops Hose That Can Repair Its Own Cracks
Released: 5-May-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Marek Urban Develops Hose That Can Repair Its Own Cracks
Clemson University

Marek Urban and his research group at Clemson University have developed a self-repairing hose to dispense hydrogen as part of the nation's effort to diversify its fuel supply in the face of increasingly dire warnings about climate change.

Newswise: Glowing glass droplets on the ISS
Released: 5-May-2022 2:05 AM EDT
Glowing glass droplets on the ISS
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Together with researchers from Ulm and Neuchâtel, Empa will soon be studying material samples on the ISS. The material in question are super-hard and corrosion-resistant alloys of palladium, nickel, copper and phosphorus - also known as "metallic glasses". A high-tech company from La Chaux-de-Fonds, which produces materials for the watch industry, is also involved.

Newswise: ORNL’s Chi elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Released: 4-May-2022 2:40 PM EDT
ORNL’s Chi elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Miaofang Chi, a scientist at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America, or MSA.

29-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Not all valved N95 masks are the same when filtering exhaled air, study finds
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Using valved respirators to prevent the spread of COVID-19 has been discouraged due to concerns that valves do not effectively filter particles from exhaled air, but few studies actually have looked at this. Now, researchers report in Environmental Science & Technology Letters on their performance.

Newswise: Machine Learning Program for Games Inspires Development of Groundbreaking Scientific Tool
Released: 3-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Machine Learning Program for Games Inspires Development of Groundbreaking Scientific Tool
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists have developed a groundbreaking AI-based algorithm for modeling the properties of materials at the atomic and molecular scale. It should greatly speed up materials discovery.

Released: 2-May-2022 2:10 PM EDT
Can the U.S. become a global leader in battery manufacturing?
Argonne National Laboratory

The U.S. has great potential to become a global leader in battery manufacturing, but critical challenges still need to be addressed to realize that potential. This was a key takeaway of Bridging the Gap, a recent two-day workshop hosted by Li-Bridge.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Future Wearable Health Tech Could Measure Gases Released From Skin
Ohio State University

Scientists have taken the first step to creating the next generation of wearable health monitors.

Newswise: First International Conference on Heterostructured Materials (HSM I)
Released: 29-Apr-2022 8:30 AM EDT
First International Conference on Heterostructured Materials (HSM I)
Hong Kong Institute for Advanced Study, City University of Hong Kong

HSMs represent an emerging class of materials that are expected to become a major field of scientific exploration for the materials, mechanics, physics and computer simulation communities in the coming years. As an emerging materials field, many fundamental issues need to be probed.

Newswise: Skyrmions on the Rise – New 2D Material Advances Low-Power Computing
Released: 28-Apr-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Skyrmions on the Rise – New 2D Material Advances Low-Power Computing
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team co-led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has discovered a new ultrathin material with exotic magnetic features called skyrmions. The new material could enable the next generation of tiny, fast, energy-efficient electronic devices.

Newswise: Twelve-stroke engine
Released: 28-Apr-2022 4:05 AM EDT
Twelve-stroke engine
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

In recent years, Empa has worked with an external hydraulics specialist to develop a fully variable electrohydraulic valve control system. called FlexWork, which can be used for internal combustion engines and other thermal/pneumatic machines.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Argonne Scientists Discover New Way to Diagnose Cracks in Concrete
Argonne National Laboratory

A chemical reaction that causes concrete to crack and deteriorate can now be identified without harm, according to Argonne scientists.

Newswise: Decoding the Lifecycle of Photogenerated Charges
Released: 26-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Decoding the Lifecycle of Photogenerated Charges
Department of Energy, Office of Science

New materials will enable novel technologies to turn sunlight into electricity and fuels. Combinations of molecules and tiny nanoparticles make these materials a reality. Scientists have found a way to track electrons along their round trip from the molecules to the nanoparticles and back, helping to find where electrons can travel and where they get stuck, information that is crucial to finding better combinations for innovative materials.

Released: 26-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Swelling Colloids Could Fix Short Circuits in Geothermal Wells
Cornell University

Swelling colloids – mixtures, such as milk and paint, in which particles are suspended in a substance and which can grow up to 100 times larger under certain temperatures – could be used to fix flow pathways in underground geothermal systems, a problem that has hobbled investment in geothermal energy.

Newswise: Water Processing: Light Helps Degrade Hormones
Released: 25-Apr-2022 3:05 AM EDT
Water Processing: Light Helps Degrade Hormones
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Micropollutants in water often are hormones that accumulate in the environment and may have negative impacts on humans and animals. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Leibniz Institute of Surface Engineering (IOM) in Leipzig have now developed a process for the photocatalytic degradation of these pollutants when they flow through polymer membranes. It is presented in Nature Nanotechnology. Irradiation with light triggers a chemical reaction, as a result of which steroid hormones are degraded on the membranes coated with titanium dioxide. (DOI: 10.1038/s41565-022-01074-8)

Released: 22-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Nanoclusters self-organize into centimeter-scale hierarchical assemblies
Cornell University

A Cornell-led project has created synthetic nanoclusters that can mimic this hierarchical self-assembly all the way from the nanometer to the centimeter scale, spanning seven orders of magnitude. The resulting synthetic thin films have the potential to serve as a model system for exploring biomimetic hierarchical systems and future advanced functions.

Newswise: Designing the perfect piece of chocolate
Released: 21-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Designing the perfect piece of chocolate
Universiteit van Amsterdam

We like some foods, and dislike others.

Newswise:Video Embedded senator-cantwell-science-leaders-help-break-ground-on-75-million-grid-storage-launchpad
VIDEO
Released: 21-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Senator Cantwell, Science Leaders Help Break Ground on $75 Million Grid Storage Launchpad
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

New facility will accelerate energy storage innovation, increase clean energy adoption and grid resilience.

Newswise: Wrapped with Inspiration this Earth Day 2022
Released: 21-Apr-2022 12:25 PM EDT
Wrapped with Inspiration this Earth Day 2022
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack University Medical Center donates blue surgical wrap to North Bergen High School where students transform the medical grade material into magnificent fashion in honor of healthcare workers and Earth Day 2022!

Newswise: Lasers trigger magnetism in atomically thin quantum materials
17-Apr-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Lasers trigger magnetism in atomically thin quantum materials
University of Washington

Researchers discovered that light can trigger a form of magnetism in a normally nonmagnetic material. This magnetism centers on the behavior of electron “spin.” By controlling & aligning electron spin at this level of detail & accuracy, this platform could have applications in quantum computing & simulation.

Newswise:Video Embedded university-of-kentucky-students-creating-safer-ppe-for-frontline-workers
VIDEO
Released: 20-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
University of Kentucky Students Creating Safer PPE for Frontline Workers
University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky students in the Textile Testing Laboratory are helping develop durable, reusable personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers.

Released: 20-Apr-2022 7:00 AM EDT
Marek Urban develops hose that can repair its own cracks
Clemson University

Dr. Marek Urban and his research group at Clemson University have developed a self-repairing hose to dispense hydrogen as part of the nation's effort to diversify its fuel supply in the face of increasingly dire warnings about climate change.

Newswise: Lab creates superfluid circuit using fermions to study electron behavior
Released: 19-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Lab creates superfluid circuit using fermions to study electron behavior
Dartmouth College

Tunable atomic test bed allows researchers to explore the phenomena behind exotic materials

Newswise: New laser-based volumetric additive manufacturing method can 3D print glass in seconds
Released: 19-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
New laser-based volumetric additive manufacturing method can 3D print glass in seconds
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Using a new laser-based Volumetric Additive Manufacturing (VAM) approach—an emerging technology in near-instant 3D printing—researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley demonstrated the ability to 3D-print microscopic objects in silica glass, part of an effort to produce delicate, layer-less optics that can be built in seconds or minutes. The results are reported in the latest edition of the journal Science.

Newswise:Video Embedded story-tips-supply-chain-crunch-safer-batteries-on-impact-and-lithium-light-bright
VIDEO
Released: 18-Apr-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Story tips: Supply chain crunch, safer batteries on impact and lithium light bright
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Supply chain crunch, safer batteries on impact and lithium light bright

Newswise: Extract from a common kitchen spice could be key to greener, more efficient fuel cells
8-Apr-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Extract from a common kitchen spice could be key to greener, more efficient fuel cells
Clemson University

Turmeric, a spice found in most kitchens, has an extract that could lead to safer, more efficient fuel cells. Researchers at the Clemson Nanomaterials Institute and their collaborators from the Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning in India discovered a novel way to combine curcumin and gold nanoparticles to create an electrode that requires 100 times less energy to efficiently converts ethanol into electricity.

Newswise: Golden Wedding for Molecules
Released: 14-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Golden Wedding for Molecules
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Chemical syntheses in liquids and gases take place in three-dimensional space. Random collisions between molecules have to result in something new in an extremely short time. But there is another way: on a gold surface under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, molecules lying still next to each other can be made to combine - even those that would never want to react with each other in a liquid. Researchers at Empa have now discovered such a reaction. Best of all, the experts can "take pictures" and watch every step of the reaction.

Newswise:Video Embedded seeing-more-deeply-into-nanomaterials
VIDEO
Released: 13-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Seeing More Deeply into Nanomaterials
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY - From designing new biomaterials to novel photonic devices, new materials built through a process called bottom-up nanofabrication, or self-assembly, are opening up pathways to new technologies with properties tuned at the nanoscale. However, to fully unlock the potential of these new materials, researchers need to "see" into their tiny creations so that they can control the design and fabrication in order to enable the material's desired properties.


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