Feature Channels: Materials Science

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Released: 22-Jun-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Self-assembly of stimuli-responsive coiled-coil fibrous hydrogels
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Jin Kim Montclare, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering led a team who previously reported a responsive hydrogel formed using a coiled-coil protein. The team expanded their studies to identify the gelation of Q protein at distinct temperatures and pH conditions.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Modeling A Circular Economy For Electronic Waste
University of Pittsburgh

Think about how many different pieces of technology the average household has purchased in the last decade.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:30 PM EDT
New method for molecular functionalization of surfaces
University of Münster

One vision that is currently driving material scientists is to combine organic molecules (and their diverse functionalities) with the technological possibilities offered by extremely sophisticated semiconductor electronics.

Newswise: Inkjet Printing “Impossible Materials”
17-Jun-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Inkjet Printing “Impossible Materials”
Tufts University

Engineers developed inexpensive methods to make “impossible materials” that interact in unusual ways with microwave energy. Thin film polymers inkjet printed with tiny component patterns collect or transmit energy with much greater selectivity, sensitivity, and power than conventional materials.

Newswise: Alex Harris Named Energy Sciences Director at Brookhaven Lab
Released: 21-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Alex Harris Named Energy Sciences Director at Brookhaven Lab
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has named Alex Harris as Director of the Lab’s Energy Sciences Department, effective May 1, 2021. In his new position, Harris will manage several divisions of the Laboratory, including the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, the Chemistry Division, and the Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Division.

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Released: 18-Jun-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Surprising spider hair discovery may inspire stronger adhesives
Frontiers

Just how do spiders walk straight up -- and even upside-down across -- so many different types of surfaces? Answering this question could open up new opportunities for creating powerful, yet reversible, bioinspired adhesives.

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Released: 18-Jun-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Imaging at the tip of a needle
University of Exeter

Scientists have developed a new technique that could revolutionise medical imaging procedures using light.

Released: 18-Jun-2021 4:05 AM EDT
Atomic-scale tailoring of graphene approaches macroscopic world
University of Vienna

Properties of materials are often defined by imperfections in their atomic structure, especially when the material itself is just one atom thick, such as graphene. Researchers at the University of Vienna have now developed a method for controlled creation of such imperfections into graphene at length scales approaching the macroscopic world. These results, confirmed by atomically resolved microscope images and published in the journal Nano Letters, serve as an essential starting point both for tailoring graphene for applications and for the development of new materials.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Changing a 2D Material’s Symmetry Can Unlock Its Promise
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Nature Nanotechnology, a team of materials scientists and engineers, led by Jian Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, used a strain gradient in order to break inversion symmetry, creating a novel optoelectronic phenomenon in the promising material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) — for the first time.

16-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories Award Codeplay Software to Further Strengthen SYCL™ Support Extending the Open Standard Software for AMD GPUs
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has awarded Codeplay a contract implementing the oneAPI DPC++ compiler, an implementation of the SYCL open standard software, to support AMD GPU-based high-performance compute (HPC) supercomputers.

Newswise: An Ally for Alloys
Released: 16-Jun-2021 6:20 PM EDT
An Ally for Alloys
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Machine learning techniques are accelerating the development of stronger alloys for power plants, which will yield efficiency, cost, and decarbonization benefits.

Newswise: Computers Help Researchers Find Materials to Turn Solar Power Into Hydrogen
Released: 16-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Computers Help Researchers Find Materials to Turn Solar Power Into Hydrogen
Penn State Institute for Computational and Data Sciences

A Penn State-led team of researchers report they have taken a step toward overcoming the challenge of inexpensive hydrogen production by using supercomputers to find materials that could help accelerate hydrogen separation when water is exposed to light, a process called photocatalysis.

Newswise: ‘Wonder material’ can be used to detect COVID-19 quickly, accurately
Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
‘Wonder material’ can be used to detect COVID-19 quickly, accurately
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have successfully used graphene — one of the strongest, thinnest known materials — to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory experiments.

Newswise: Internships Put Futures in Flight
Released: 15-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Internships Put Futures in Flight
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL intern Ki Ahn spent this past year as an undergraduate at PNNL gaining hands-on research experience in clean energy storage technologies for vehicles and aviation. Ahn is enrolling in Stanford University this fall to finish his bachelor’s degree. With plans to major in mechanical engineering or computer science, he wants to explore how future aircraft technologies can be designed to reduce harmful environmental effects.

Newswise:Video Embedded efficient-dehumidifier-makes-air-conditioning-a-breeze
VIDEO
Released: 15-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Efficient Dehumidifier Makes Air Conditioning a Breeze
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

New energy-efficient dehumidifier technology holds promise to reduce energy consumption in residential A/C systems and increase the range of electric vehicles.

Newswise:Video Embedded can-artificial-intelligence-open-new-doors-for-materials-discovery
VIDEO
Released: 15-Jun-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Can Artificial Intelligence Open New Doors for Materials Discovery?
Argonne National Laboratory

An Argonne engineer applied a specific type of artificial intelligence to the problem of how to predict material structures by only knowing some of their properties. This first-of-its-kind discovery led to further insights into the long-term durability of nuclear materials.

Newswise: A Keen Eye Behind the Microscope
Released: 14-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
A Keen Eye Behind the Microscope
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL's Dongsheng Li’s crystal formation research helped reveal why nanoparticles sometimes self-assemble into five-sided shapes. The discovery will potentially be useful in medical research, electronics, and other applications.

Newswise: Swiss-cheese Design Could Help Scientists Harness the Power of the Sun
Released: 11-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Swiss-cheese Design Could Help Scientists Harness the Power of the Sun
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

The big holes in Swiss cheese help make it a tasty treat. Now, scientists at PPPL are adding tiny, Swiss-cheese-type holes to components to improve the process of bringing to Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

Newswise: Researchers discover a key cause of energy loss in spintronic materials
Released: 11-Jun-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Researchers discover a key cause of energy loss in spintronic materials
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A study led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers uncovered a property of magnetic materials that will allow engineers to develop more efficient spintronic devices in the future. Spintronics focuses on using the magnetic “spin” property of electrons instead of their charge, which improves the speed and efficiency of devices used for computing and data storage.

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 4:40 PM EDT
'Vegan spider silk' provides sustainable alternative to single-use plastics
University of Cambridge

Researchers have created a plant-based, sustainable, scalable material that could replace single-use plastics in many consumer products.

Newswise: NEST to Open its Virtual Doors
Released: 10-Jun-2021 4:05 AM EDT
NEST to Open its Virtual Doors
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The research and innovation building NEST of Empa and Eawag can now be visited virtually at any time and from anywhere in the world. The launch of the virtual NEST tour is a further step towards closing the gap between laboratory research and market entry. By making numerous innovations, developed and demonstrated at NEST, accessible to a much broader and more international audience, the virtual NEST is making a significant contribution to ensuring that sustainable innovations in the building and energy sector can spread faster and thus gain a foothold in the construction industry.

Newswise: What will happen to the COVID-19 plexiglass barriers?
Released: 8-Jun-2021 10:20 AM EDT
What will happen to the COVID-19 plexiglass barriers?
Iowa State University

Iowa State students, faculty and staff are planning for what will happen to the approximately 500 plexiglass barriers that were erected to protect public health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
Released: 7-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
University of California San Diego

A new technology could dramatically improve the safety and performance of lithium-ion batteries that operate with gas electrolytes at ultra-low temperatures. By keeping electrolytes from vaporizing, the technology can prevent pressure buildup inside the battery that leads to swelling and explosions.

7-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
A quantum step to a heat switch with no moving parts
Ohio State University

Researchers have discovered a new electronic property at the frontier between the thermal and quantum sciences in a specially engineered metal alloy – and in the process identified a promising material for future devices that could turn heat on and off with the application of a magnetic “switch.”

Newswise: Lighting Up Ultrafast Magnetism in a Metal Oxide
Released: 7-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Lighting Up Ultrafast Magnetism in a Metal Oxide
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists studied what happens when very short pulses of laser light strike a magnetic material. Understanding how magnetic correlations change over short timescales is the first step in being able to control magnetism for applications.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Engineers create a programmable fiber
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

MIT researchers have created the first fiber with digital capabilities, able to sense, store, analyze, and infer activity after being sewn into a shirt.

Newswise: Scientists Discover New Approach to Stabilize Cathode Materials
Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Scientists Discover New Approach to Stabilize Cathode Materials
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—A team of researchers led by chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has studied an elusive property in cathode materials, called a valence gradient, to understand its effect on battery performance. The findings, published in Nature Communications, demonstrated that the valence gradient can serve as a new approach for stabilizing the structure of high-nickel-content cathodes against degradation and safety issues.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-biodegradable-battery
VIDEO
Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
The biodegradable battery
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The number of data-transmitting microdevices, for instance in packaging and transport logistics, will increase sharply in the coming years. All these devices need energy, but the amount of batteries would have a major impact on the environment. Empa researchers have developed a biodegradable mini-capacitor that can solve the problem. It consists of carbon, cellulose, glycerin and table salt. And it works reliably.

Newswise: Scientists make powerful underwater glue inspired by barnacles and mussels
27-May-2021 11:05 PM EDT
Scientists make powerful underwater glue inspired by barnacles and mussels
Tufts University

Scientists replicate the molecular properties of the natural cement used by barnacles and mussels to create a powerful adhesive using silk protein. The new adhesive can work well in both dry and underwater conditions.

Newswise: Saving Lives: India’s Technical Textile Revolution Paved Way for COVID-19 Response
Released: 2-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Saving Lives: India’s Technical Textile Revolution Paved Way for COVID-19 Response
Texas Tech University

To help the field grow, Seshadri Ramkumar – now a professor of advanced materials – has partnered with the Indian government and technical textiles organizations around the world to host conferences in India since the early 2000s.

Newswise: Decontaminating N95 masks for reuse
Released: 2-Jun-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Decontaminating N95 masks for reuse
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have determined that heating N95 respirators up to 75 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes deactivates a surrogate coronavirus without compromising the device’s fit and its ability to filter airborne particles.

Newswise: Acoustic solutions made from natural fibres can reduce buildings’ carbon footprints
Released: 2-Jun-2021 5:05 AM EDT
Acoustic solutions made from natural fibres can reduce buildings’ carbon footprints
Aalto University

Researchers at Aalto University, in collaboration with Finnish acoustics company Lumir, have now studied how the acoustic solutions around us could become more eco-friendly, with the help of cellulose fibres. The acoustic insulation market is already expected to hit 15 billion USD by 2022 as construction firms and industry pay more attention to sound environments.

Newswise: Story tips: Un-Earthly ice, buildings in the loop, batteries unbound and 3D printing for geothermal
Released: 1-Jun-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Story tips: Un-Earthly ice, buildings in the loop, batteries unbound and 3D printing for geothermal
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Un-Earthly ice, buildings in the loop, batteries unbound and 3D printing for geothermal

Newswise:Video Embedded graduate-student-finalists-show-their-work-during-research-elevator-pitch-competition
VIDEO
Released: 1-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Graduate student finalists show their work during research elevator pitch competition
Penn State Materials Research Institute

Penn State graduate students in materials science and materials engineering learn valuable career skills such as concise presentation of their research and win prizes during the 2021 Millennium Café PPG Elevator Pitch Competition on May 15 and May 18.

Newswise: Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties
Released: 27-May-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Researchers build structured, multi-part nanocrystals with super light-emitting properties
Iowa State University

Researchers have combined two or three types of nanoparticles to produce new materials with structures known as superlattices. In some instances, the structures display fundamental new properties such as superfluorescence. The researchers' discovery is reported in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Two Henry Samueli School of Engineering scientists win DOE early career awards
Released: 27-May-2021 5:30 PM EDT
Two Henry Samueli School of Engineering scientists win DOE early career awards
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 27, 2021 — The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science has awarded funding to two University of California, Irvine scientists under its DOE Early Career Research Program. Mohammad Abdolhosseini Qomi, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Penghui Cao, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, were among 83 researchers selected from university and national laboratory applicants to receive the research awards.

Newswise: Engineered defects in crystalline material boosts electrical performance
Released: 27-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Engineered defects in crystalline material boosts electrical performance
Iowa State University

Researchers have discovered that engineering one-dimensional line defects into certain materials can increase their electrical performance.

Newswise: Scientists Earn Early Career Awards
Released: 27-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Scientists Earn Early Career Awards
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

The DOE Early Career Research Program supports exceptional researchers during the crucial early years of their careers and helps advance scientific discovery in fundamental sciences

Newswise: Three Los Alamos scientists honored by American Nuclear Society
Released: 27-May-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Three Los Alamos scientists honored by American Nuclear Society
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Mark B. Chadwick, chief scientist and chief operating officer of Weapons Physics, and Stuart A. Maloy, deputy group leader for Materials Science at Radiation and Dynamic Extremes, were named fellows, while D.V. Rao, program director for the Laboratory’s Civilian Nuclear Program, earned a special award for making advanced nuclear energy systems a reality.

Newswise: DOE names six Argonne scientists to receive Early Career Research Program awards
Released: 27-May-2021 1:40 PM EDT
DOE names six Argonne scientists to receive Early Career Research Program awards
Argonne National Laboratory

Six Argonne scientists receive Department of Energy’s Early Career Research Program Awards.

Newswise: Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
Released: 27-May-2021 12:05 AM EDT
Shiny mega-crystals that build themselves
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

An international team led by Empa and ETH Zurich researchers is playing with shape-engineered nanoscale building blocks that are up to 100-times larger than atoms and ions. And although these nano "Lego bricks" interact with each other with forces vastly different and much weaker than those holding atoms and ions together, they form crystals all by themselves, the structures of which resemble the ones of natural minerals. These new mega-crystals or superlattices that are depicted on the cover of the latest issue of "Nature" exhibit unique properties such as superfluorescence – and may well usher in a new era in materials science

Newswise: Unveiling what governs crystal growth
Released: 26-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Unveiling what governs crystal growth
Argonne National Laboratory

Crystals are wonders of nature and science with important applications in electronics and optics. Scientists from Argonne have new insights into how gallium nitride crystals grow. Gallium nitride crystals are in wide use in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and may form transistors for high-power switching electronics to make electric grids more energy efficient and smarter.

Released: 26-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
A new ‘gold standard’ compound for generating electricity from heat
Ohio State University

Researchers show in a new study that a single material, a layered crystal consisting of the elements rhenium and silicon, turns out to be the gold standard of transverse thermoelectric devices.

Newswise: Experimental Impact Mechanics Lab at Sandia bars none
Released: 25-May-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Experimental Impact Mechanics Lab at Sandia bars none
Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia Labs' Experimental Impact Mechanics Lab packs a world-class punch in 200-plus square feet of weights, rods, cables, bars, heaters, compressors and high-speed cameras.

Newswise: NSF renews funding for Two-Dimensional Crystal Consortium
Released: 25-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
NSF renews funding for Two-Dimensional Crystal Consortium
Penn State Materials Research Institute

The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a renewal of funding for the Materials Innovation Platform (MIP) national user facility at Penn State’s Materials Research Institute (MRI), the Two-Dimensional Crystal Consortium (2DCC). The 2DCC is one of four MIPs in the United States and was awarded $20.1 million over five years, an increase of 13% above the initial award in 2016.

Newswise: “Bite” defects in bottom-up graphene nanoribbons
Released: 25-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT
“Bite” defects in bottom-up graphene nanoribbons
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Scientists at Empa and EPFL have identified a new type of defect as the most common source of disorder in on-surface synthesized graphene nanoribbons, a novel class of carbon-based materials that may prove extremely useful in next-generation electronic devices. The researchers identified the atomic structure of these so-called "bite" defects and investigated their effect on quantum electronic transport. These kinds of defective zigzag-edged nanoribbons may provide suitable platforms for certain applications in spintronics.

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Released: 24-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
New quantum material discovered
Vienna University of Technology

In everyday life, phase transitions usually have to do with temperature changes - for example, when an ice cube gets warmer and melts.

Released: 21-May-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Superconducting quantum material has an organic twist
Cornell University

An interdisciplinary team of Cornell researchers has taken its breakthrough discovery – which melded the ability of soft organic materials to spontaneously self-organize with quantum materials to create superconductors with novel porous architectures – and upped the ante by designing a new cohort of these “quantum metamaterials” that can achieve superconductivity at temperatures competitive with state-of-the-art solid-state materials synthesis.

Released: 21-May-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Cornell researchers see atoms at record resolution
Cornell University

Now a team, again led by David Muller, the Samuel B. Eckert Professor of Engineering, has bested its own record by a factor of two with an electron microscope pixel array detector (EMPAD) that incorporates even more sophisticated 3D reconstruction algorithms.

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Released: 20-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Not all theories can explain the black hole M87*
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

As first pointed out by the German astronomer Karl Schwarzschild, black holes bend space-time to an extreme degree due to their extraordinary concentration of mass, and heat up the matter in their vicinity so that it begins to glow.


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