Feature Channels: Materials Science

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Released: 7-May-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Having a ball: New English Premier League soccer ball more stable, drags more
University of Tsukuba

Scientists from the Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences at the University of Tsukuba used aerodynamics experiments to empirically test the flight properties of a new four-panel soccer ball adopted by the English Premier League this year.

Newswise: ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Released: 6-May-2021 11:55 AM EDT
ORNL’s Sergei Kalinin elected Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Sergei Kalinin, a scientist and inventor at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America professional society.

Newswise: 264131_web.jpg
Released: 6-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Zero to hero: Overlooked material could help reduce our carbon footprint
Okayama University

It is now well known that carbon dioxide is the biggest contributor to climate change and originates primarily from burning of fossil fuels.

Newswise:Video Embedded rapid-rovers-speedy-sands-fast-tracking-terrain-interaction-modeling
VIDEO
Released: 5-May-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Rapid Rovers, Speedy Sands: Fast-Tracking Terrain Interaction Modeling
Georgia Institute of Technology

Engineers and scientists from MIT and Georgia Tech are enabling near real-time modeling of wheels, treads, and desert animals traveling at high speeds across sandy terrains. “Dynamic Resistive Force Theory,” or DRFT, provides a path to speedier granular modeling — and help in designing optimal rough terrain vehicles, like Mars and lunar rovers.

Released: 5-May-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Long-acting injectable medicine as potential route to COVID-19 therapy
University of Liverpool

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have shown the potential of repurposing an existing and cheap drug into a long-acting injectable therapy that could be used to treat Covid-19.

Newswise: Researchers Create Leather-Like Material From Silk Proteins
Released: 5-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Create Leather-Like Material From Silk Proteins
Tufts University

Engineers have created an environmentally friendly leather alternative made from silk. The material can be printed into different patterns and textures, has similar physical properties to real leather, and can withstand the folding, piercing, and stretching typically used to create leather goods.

Newswise:  Helping companies use high-performance computing to improve U.S. manufacturing
Released: 4-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Helping companies use high-performance computing to improve U.S. manufacturing
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne is helping U.S. companies solve pressing manufacturing challenges through an innovative program that provides access to Argonne’s world-class computing resources and technical expertise.

Newswise: ORNL’s superb materials expertise, data and AI tools propel progress
Released: 4-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
ORNL’s superb materials expertise, data and AI tools propel progress
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

At the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists use artificial intelligence, or AI, to accelerate the discovery and development of materials for energy and information technologies.

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Released: 3-May-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Flatfish got weird fast due to evolutionary cascade
Rice University

Ever look at a flatfish like a flounder or sole, with two eyes on one side of its head, and think, "How did that happen?"

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Released: 3-May-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Will your future clothes be made of algae?
University of Rochester

Living materials, which are made by housing biological cells within a non-living matrix, have gained popularity in recent years as scientists recognize that often the most robust materials are those that mimic nature.

Released: 3-May-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Flexible, easy-to-scale nanoribbons move graphene toward use in tech applications
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In a study published April 16 in ACS Photonics, University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers fabricated graphene into the smallest ribbon structures to date using a method that makes scaling-up simple. In tests with these tiny ribbons, the scientists discovered they were closing in on the properties they needed to move graphene toward usefulness in telecommunications equipment.

Newswise: Story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large
Released: 3-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large

Newswise: Brookhaven Lab and Northrop Grumman to Further Lab-Industry Collaborations
Released: 3-May-2021 10:50 AM EDT
Brookhaven Lab and Northrop Grumman to Further Lab-Industry Collaborations
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Through the U.S. Department of Energy’s Technologist in Residence program, Brookhaven Lab and Northrop Grumman scientists will partner on quantum materials research.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 4:15 PM EDT
A silver lining for extreme electronics
Michigan State University

Tomorrow’s cutting-edge technology will need electronics that can tolerate extreme conditions. That’s why a group of researchers led by Michigan State University’s Jason Nicholas is building stronger circuits today. Nicholas and his team have developed more heat resilient silver circuitry with an assist from nickel. The team described the work, which was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program, on April 15 in the journal Scripta Materialia. The types of devices that the MSU team is working to benefit — next-generation fuel cells, high-temperature semiconductors and solid oxide electrolysis cells — could have applications in the auto, energy and aerospace industries.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
The new study of emerging materials helping in detection of COVID-19
Ural Federal University

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is still causing a dramatic loss of human lives worldwide, constituting an unprecedented challenge for society, public health, and economy, to overcome.

Newswise: Mapping the Electronic States in an Exotic Superconductor
Released: 28-Apr-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Mapping the Electronic States in an Exotic Superconductor
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists mapped the electronic states in an exotic superconductor. The maps point to the composition range necessary for topological superconductivity, a state that could enable more robust quantum computing.

Newswise: Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have found a way to turn X-ray fluorescence into an ultra-high position-sensitive probe to measure nanostructures in thin films. The fluorescence reveals the evolution of nanostructures in real time with nearly atomic-level resolution, something no other technique has achieved. This allows scientists to watch nanostructures in thin films evolve with unprecedented precision and design thin films for new applications.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Nature provides inspiration for breakthrough in self-regulating materials
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Scientists have long sought to invent materials that can respond to the external world in predictable, self-regulating ways.

Newswise: New 2D superconductor forms at higher temperatures than ever before
Released: 27-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
New 2D superconductor forms at higher temperatures than ever before
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to generate 2D superconductivity at an interface of an insulating oxide material, at a higher transition temperature than ever seen before for these materials.

Newswise: Polymer-Based Coatings on Metallic Implants Improve Bone-Implant Integration
26-Apr-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Polymer-Based Coatings on Metallic Implants Improve Bone-Implant Integration
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Although bone has some capacity to regenerate, large bone defects cannot be healed without major medical procedures. Metallic implants are widely used, but their bioinertness poses a challenge. In Biointerphases, researchers showcase approaches that are alternatives to metallic implants and use natural polymer coatings to improve bone-implant integration, also known as osseointegration. Establishing a strong chemical interaction between a metal and a completely organic and natural polymer is a significant advancement in bone tissue engineering.

Newswise: Hydrocracking our way to recycling plastic waste
Released: 26-Apr-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Hydrocracking our way to recycling plastic waste
University of Delaware

Researchers at the University of Delaware’s Center for Plastics Innovation (CPI) have developed a process called hydrocracking to convert single-use plastic waste into ready-to-use molecules for jet fuels, diesel and lubricants. The process requires 50% less energy than other technologies and doesn’t add carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. And it can treat a variety of plastics, even when they are mixed together.

Newswise: Synthesis Method Expands Material Possibilities
Released: 23-Apr-2021 8:40 AM EDT
Synthesis Method Expands Material Possibilities
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists are making inorganic and organic-inorganic materials with tunable properties for energy, microelectronics, and other applications.

Newswise: Bringing the Power of Chemical Fuels to Artificial Building Blocks
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Bringing the Power of Chemical Fuels to Artificial Building Blocks
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Many biological systems use chemical fuels to power functions such as muscle contraction, something rare in artificial systems. If researchers can enable this behavior in artificial systems, materials could actively control their own functions and heal themselves. This research used difunctional molecular building blocks to construct large rings that can be used to produce materials that can adapt and respond like biological systems.

Newswise: The Future Looks Bright for Infinitely Recyclable Plastic
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
The Future Looks Bright for Infinitely Recyclable Plastic
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Plastics are ubiquitous, but they're not practical. Less than 10% are recycled, and the other ~8 billion tons are creating a pollution crisis. A Berkeley Lab team is determined to change that. A new analysis shows producing and recycling their game-changing new plastic could be easy and cheap enough to leave old plastics in the dust.

Newswise: NUS Engineers Repurpose Excavation Waste to Produce Greener, Stronger Concrete
Released: 21-Apr-2021 8:35 AM EDT
NUS Engineers Repurpose Excavation Waste to Produce Greener, Stronger Concrete
National University of Singapore

NUS researchers have taken a waste product from construction sites in Singapore and upcycled it into a raw material for ultra-high-performance concrete. Their method could help reduce the carbon footprint of concrete and also cut the cost of production. This is the first time low-grade waste clay has been used as fillers in concrete.

Newswise: To Design Truly Compostable Plastic, Scientists Take Cues From Nature
20-Apr-2021 5:40 PM EDT
To Design Truly Compostable Plastic, Scientists Take Cues From Nature
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have designed an enzyme-activated compostable plastic that could diminish microplastics pollution. Household tap water or soil composts break the hybrid plastic material down to reusable small molecules, called monomers, in just a few days or weeks.

Newswise: Cerreta Named President of Nation’s Professional Society for Minerals, Metals, and Materials Scientists and Engineers
Released: 20-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Cerreta Named President of Nation’s Professional Society for Minerals, Metals, and Materials Scientists and Engineers
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Ellen Cerreta, the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s division leader for Materials Science and Technology, has been named president of The Minerals, Metals, & Materials Society (TMS), a professional society for scientists and engineers in those fields.

Newswise: Marine Animals Inspire New Approaches to Structural Topology Optimization
Released: 20-Apr-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Marine Animals Inspire New Approaches to Structural Topology Optimization
Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) have uncovered a new approach to structural topology optimization is outlined that unifies both design and manufacturing to create novel microstructures. Potential applications range from improved facial implants for cranial reconstruction to better ways to get materials into space for planetary exploration.

Newswise: Evaluating integrity of highway base layer
Released: 20-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Evaluating integrity of highway base layer
South Dakota State University

Working with the S.D. DOT, researchers are evaluating a cost-effective method of determining quality of the base layer in the field.

Newswise: NUS engineers develop eco-friendly technique to upcycle metal waste into multi-purpose aerogels
Released: 19-Apr-2021 11:05 PM EDT
NUS engineers develop eco-friendly technique to upcycle metal waste into multi-purpose aerogels
National University of Singapore

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have developed a green technique to upcycle metal waste into multi-purpose aerogels. These metal-based aerogels have high thermal and mechanical stability and could potentially be used as light-weight building materials and for growing cells for biomedical purposes.

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VIDEO
Released: 19-Apr-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Finding What Makes Catalysts Tick
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Computational chemist Samantha Johnson, who is searching for combinations to bolster energy future, is among the PNNL scientists preparing to move into the Energy Sciences Center. The new $90 million, 140,000-square-foot facility, is under construction on the PNNL campus and will accelerate innovation in energy research using chemistry, materials science, and quantum information sciences to support the nation’s climate and clean energy research agenda.

Newswise:Video Embedded super-sticky-johns-hopkins-apl-creates-strong-fast-waterproof-adhesive
VIDEO
Released: 16-Apr-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Super Sticky: Johns Hopkins APL Creates Strong, Fast, Waterproof Adhesive
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

APL created an additive to turn commercial glue into a rapidly curing underwater adhesive that is effective on a range of surfaces, including aluminum, stainless steel, glass and plastic. The adhesive performed best on untreated aluminum surfaces with a high bonding strength of approximately 400 pounds in 60 seconds.

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Released: 15-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
FSU Engineers Improve Performance of High-Temperature Superconductor Wires
Florida State University

Florida State University researchers have discovered a novel way to improve the performance of electrical wires used as high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Researchers used high-resolution scanning electron microscopy to understand how processing methods influence grains in bismuth-based superconducting wires (known as Bi-2212).

Released: 15-Apr-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Self-Built Protein Coatings Could Improve Biomedical Devices
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Fouling is a natural phenomenon that describes the tendency of proteins in water to adhere to nearby surfaces. It’s what causes unwanted deposits of protein to form during some food production or on biomedical implants, causing them to fail. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are harnessing this process, which is typically considered a persistent challenge, to develop a versatile and accessible approach for modifying solid surfaces.

Released: 15-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Arthur S. Flemming Awards Honor Outstanding Federal Employees
George Washington University

Twelve exceptional public servants representing a diverse array of federal agencies will be honored at the 72nd annual Arthur S. Flemming Awards. The winners are recognized for performing outstanding service in the fields of applied science and engineering, basic science, leadership and management, legal achievement, and social science.

Newswise: With this new science, plastics could see a second life as biodegradable surfactants
Released: 15-Apr-2021 12:05 PM EDT
With this new science, plastics could see a second life as biodegradable surfactants
Ames Laboratory

Scientists at the Institute for Cooperative Upcycling of Plastics (iCOUP) have discovered a chemical process that provides biodegradable chemicals, which are used as surfactants and detergents in a range of applications, from discarded plastics.

Newswise: Materials Research Society Fellow
Released: 15-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Materials Research Society Fellow
University of Delaware

David C. Martin, the Karl W. and Renate Böer Chaired Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, has been named a 2021 Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS) “for the design, synthesis, and characterization of conjugated polymers for interfacing electronic biomedical devices with living tissue; and for service to the MRS and broader materials community.”

Newswise: Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

At NEST, the research and innovation platform of Empa and Eawag, the new Sprint unit is currently under construction – an office unit built largely from recycled materials. Sprint aims to set new standards for circular construction. However, the office unit is also a reaction to the current COVID-19 situation, which made it clear that we need to adapt our buildings more flexibly and quickly to changing needs.

Newswise: Penn State Mourns the Loss of Della Roy
Released: 12-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Penn State Mourns the Loss of Della Roy
Penn State Materials Research Institute

The Penn State and materials research communities are mourning the loss of Della M. Roy, emeritus professor of materials science and a founding member of the Penn State Materials Research Laboratory (MRL), now the Materials Research Institute (MRI). Della died on March 27 at age 94. Della was known as an international leader in the field of cement and concrete research and for being a groundbreaker for women in science.

Newswise: FSU engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:05 AM EDT
FSU engineering researchers visualize the motion of vortices in superfluid turbulence
Florida State University

In a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Florida State University researchers managed to visualize the vortex tubes in a quantum fluid, findings that could help researchers better understand turbulence in quantum fluids and beyond.

Newswise: Better solutions for making hydrogen may lie just at the surface
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Better solutions for making hydrogen may lie just at the surface
Argonne National Laboratory

A new study uncovers insight into a promising type of material for splitting water, perovskite oxides.

Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
New Biosealant Can Stabilize Cartilage, Promote Healing After Injury
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers showed that a new hyaluronic acid hydrogel system can reinforce and seal areas of injured cartilage in animal studies

Released: 8-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
The Spintronics Technology Revolution Could Be Just a Hopfion Away
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A research team co-led by Berkeley Lab has created and observed quasiparticles called 3D hopfions at the nanoscale (billionths of a meter) in a magnetic system. The discovery could advance high-density, high-speed, low-power, yet ultrastable magnetic memory “spintronics” devices.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Powerful polymers: ORNL study provides new insights into N95’s COVID-19 filter efficiency
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Research results on the N95 filter media, recently published in ACS Applied Polymer Materials, outline the science behind what led to ORNL’s successful production of material on the CFTF’s precursor production line.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Less than a nanometer thick, stronger and more versatile than steel
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University and the University of Florida report a breakthrough involving a material called borophane, a sheet of boron and hydrogen a mere two atoms in thickness.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips: Mighty Mo Material, Fueling Retooling, Goods on the Move, Doubling Concrete and Batteries Passport
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Mighty Mo material, fueling retooling, goods on the move, doubling concrete and batteries passport

2-Apr-2021 7:05 PM EDT
This hydrogen fuel machine could be the ultimate guide to self improvement
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Scientists at Berkeley have uncovered an extraordinary self-improving property that transforms an ordinary semiconductor into a highly efficient and stable artificial photosynthesis device


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