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Released: 7-May-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Online learning doesn't improve student sleep habits, research suggests
Simon Fraser University

New research from Simon Fraser University suggests that students learning remotely become night owls but do not sleep more despite the time saved commuting, working or attending social events.

Released: 7-May-2021 9:35 AM EDT
18.5M-year-old vine fossil identified as new species
Cornell University

An 18.5 million-year-old fossil found in Panama provides evidence of a new species and is the oldest reliable example of a climbing woody vine known as a liana from the soapberry family. The discovery sheds light on the evolution of climbing plants.

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Embargo will expire: 12-May-2021 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 3-May-2021 1:55 PM EDT

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Newswise: New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
University of California San Diego

Scientists from around the world have produced a new analysis—believed to be the most detailed study of specialized ecological data from global forests—that is furthering science’s understanding of species interactions and how diversity contributes to the preservation of ecosystem health.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Study finds US Twitter users have strongly supported face coverings amid the pandemic
University of Oregon

An analysis of Twitter activity between March 1 and Aug. 1, 2020, found strong support by U.S. users for wearing face coverings and that a media focus on anti-mask opinions fueled the rhetoric of those opposed, report University of Oregon researchers.

Newswise: Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
Released: 28-Apr-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
University of California San Diego

Individuals who self-identify as Republicans became more skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine and other inoculations, such as the flu shot, over the course of the pandemic, reveals a new study by the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Artificial intelligence model predicts which key of the immune system opens the locks of coronavirus
University of Helsinki

The human immune defense is based on the ability of white blood cells to accurately identify disease-causing pathogens and to initiate a defense reaction against them

Released: 21-Apr-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Shift-work causes negative impacts on health, affects men and women differently
University of Waterloo

Shift-work and irregular work schedules can cause several health-related issues and affect our defence against infection, according to new research from the University of Waterloo.

14-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Lower COVID-19 rates seen in US states with higher adherence to mask wearing
PLOS

New evidence supports mask wearing in public as key to reducing spread of COVID-19

13-Apr-2021 10:30 AM EDT
The Internet Brings People Into Big Cities, New Study Suggests
University of Bristol

The widespread proliferation of the internet and information and communication technologies (ICT) has drawn people into urban centres, according to new research.

12-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 in Combination with Hemorrhagic Stroke Doubles Death Risk
University of Utah Health

COVID-19 and hemorrhagic stroke are a deadly combination, increasing the risk of death up to 2.4 times among patients who have this pairing compared to those who only had hemorrhagic strokes, according to a nationwide study led by University of Utah Health scientists. Patients who survived had longer hospital stays, more medical complications, and less favorable outcomes than those who did not have both conditions.

Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Pandemic Paradox: People Want to Improve Mental Health by Exercising, but Stress and Anxiety Get in the Way, Research Shows
McMaster University

The pandemic has created a paradox where mental health has become both a motivator for and a barrier to physical activity.

Newswise: New approach to blood-based tuberculosis diagnosis
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
New approach to blood-based tuberculosis diagnosis
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Optical biosensor device aids in biomarker identification

Released: 1-Apr-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Researchers devise more efficient, enduring CAR gene therapy to combat HIV
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A UCLA research team has shown that using a truncated form of the CD4 molecule as part of a gene therapy to combat HIV yielded superior and longer-lasting results in mouse models than previous similar therapies using the CD4 molecule.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Researchers Link New Risk Factors to Increased Risk of COVID-19 Infection
University of Maryland Medical Center

While it has already been established that those with Type II diabetes and a high body mass index (BMI) are at greater risk of experiencing hospitalizations and other severe complications related to COVID-19, they are also at greater risk of getting symptomatic infection in the first place.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
COVID-19 Antibody Tests, Even Rapid Finger Pricks, are Effective, New Study Finds
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds that antibody tests are able to predict prior COVID-19 infection, even for people with mild symptoms. Researchers also found that low-cost rapid screening methods, including finger prick tests, detect infection with nearly the same precision as higher-complexity lab tests.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 5:25 PM EDT
Why SARS-CoV-2 replicates better in the upper respiratory tract
University of Bern

"SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV are highly similar genetically, generate a homologous repertoire of viral proteins, and use the same receptor to infect human cells.

Released: 25-Mar-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Should you take fish oil? Depends on your genotype
University of Georgia

Fish oil supplements are a billion-dollar industry built on a foundation of purported, but not proven, health benefits. Now, new research from a team led by a University of Georgia scientist indicates that taking fish oil only provides health benefits if you have the right genetic makeup.

Newswise: IU study finds COVID-19 differs from other coronaviruses
Released: 23-Mar-2021 12:40 PM EDT
IU study finds COVID-19 differs from other coronaviruses
Indiana University

IU study finds COVID-19 differs from other coronaviruses which may be contributing to difficulty in controlling disease spread and burden.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Cancer survivors face elevated heart disease risk, study finds
Ohio State University

A new study has found that about 35% of Americans with a cancer history had an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease in the next decade, compared with about 23% of those who didn’t have cancer.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 17-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: Black Women More Likely To Gain Weight Than White Women After Menopause
Released: 15-Mar-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Black Women More Likely To Gain Weight Than White Women After Menopause
Rush University Medical Center

In a study published published in the medical journal PLOS ONE, researchers from Rush Institute for Health Aging find that racial disparities play a role in weight gain in older women.

Released: 15-Mar-2021 11:20 AM EDT
High emotional intelligence 'can help to identify fake news'
University of Strathclyde

People with high levels of emotional intelligence are less likely to be susceptible to 'fake news', according to research at the University of Strathclyde.

Released: 15-Mar-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Fear of COVID-19 : Psychological, not environmental factors are important
University of Vienna

During pandemics, protective behaviors need to be motivated by effective communication. A critical factor in understanding a population’s response to such a threat is the fear it elicits, since fear both contributes to motivating protective responses, but can also lead to panic-driven behaviors. Furthermore, lockdown measures affect well-being, making it important to identify protective factors that help to maintain high perceived levels of health during restrictions.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 2:55 PM EST
Scientists Discover Cellular Stress Enzyme That Might Play Key Role in Neurodegenerative Diseases Such as ALS
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An enzyme called MARK2 has been identified as a key stress-response switch in cells in a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Newswise: Helpful behavior during pandemic tied to recognizing common humanity
Released: 10-Mar-2021 2:25 PM EST
Helpful behavior during pandemic tied to recognizing common humanity
University of Washington

A new University of Washington study finds that an identification with all humanity, as opposed to identification with a geographic area like a country or town, predicts whether someone will engage in “prosocial” behaviors particular to the pandemic, such as donating extra masks or coming to the aid of a sick person.

Newswise: Mothers rebuild: Solutions to overcome COVID-19 challenges in academia
Released: 9-Mar-2021 3:40 PM EST
Mothers rebuild: Solutions to overcome COVID-19 challenges in academia
Michigan Technological University

Over the summer and fall, paper after paper revealed that mothers are one of the demographics hardest hit by the pandemic. However, none brought solutions to the forefront of the conversation, so 13 researchers—all moms themselves—penned a roadmap for policies to support mothers in academia.

Newswise:Video Embedded thin-explosive-films-provide-snapshot-of-how-detonations-start
VIDEO
Released: 4-Mar-2021 8:55 AM EST
Thin explosive films provide snapshot of how detonations start
Sandia National Laboratories

Using thin films — no more than a few pieces of notebook paper thick — of a common explosive chemical, researchers from Sandia National Laboratories studied how small-scale explosions start and grow. These experiments advanced fundamental knowledge of detonations.

Released: 25-Feb-2021 5:25 PM EST
Men obstructed from entering female-dominated occupations
Linkoping University

Job applications from men are disfavoured when they apply for work in female-dominated occupations. Reaching the interview stage was most difficult for men applying for jobs as cleaners.

Newswise: New Model Predicts Cancer Drug Efficacy Across and Within Cancer Types
Released: 25-Feb-2021 2:50 PM EST
New Model Predicts Cancer Drug Efficacy Across and Within Cancer Types
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As large multi-cancer datasets become more important for predicting who may benefit from cancer drugs, a new model better accounts for potentially overlooked variation.

24-Feb-2021 2:05 PM EST
The impact of face masks on heart rate and oxygenation
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Researchers at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital published new findings today that wearing a face mask – either a cloth mask or a surgical mask – did not impair the ability of subjects to get air in and out of their bodies.

Newswise: Do atheists have a moral compass?
Released: 24-Feb-2021 2:00 PM EST
Do atheists have a moral compass?
University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago social psychologist examines what values people view as relevant for morality

Newswise: Researchers Use Machine Learning to Identify Autism Blood Biomarkers
Released: 24-Feb-2021 2:00 PM EST
Researchers Use Machine Learning to Identify Autism Blood Biomarkers
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Feb. 24, 2021 – Using machine learning tools to analyze hundreds of proteins, UT Southwestern researchers have identified a group of biomarkers in blood that could lead to an earlier diagnosis of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and, in turn, more effective therapies sooner.

23-Feb-2021 2:40 PM EST
Politicized Pandemic Shaped Compliance with Social Distancing
Ohio State University

Politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic had a powerful influence over adherence to social distancing guidelines in the United States and why people did, or did not, comply during the lockdown days, a new study has found.

Newswise: The Original Antigenic Sin: How Childhood Infections Could Shape Pandemics
15-Feb-2021 9:00 AM EST
The Original Antigenic Sin: How Childhood Infections Could Shape Pandemics
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

A child’s first influenza infection shapes their immunity to future airborne flu viruses – including emerging pandemic strains. But not all flu strains spur the same initial immune defense, according to new findings published today by University of Pittsburgh virologists.

Newswise: Genetics May Play Role in Determining Immunity to COVID-19
Released: 18-Feb-2021 10:10 AM EST
Genetics May Play Role in Determining Immunity to COVID-19
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers report that individual immune response to SARS-CoV-2 may be limited by a set of variable genes that code for cell surface proteins essential for the adaptive immune system. The finding may help explain why COVID-19 immunity varies by individual.

Newswise: Vanderbilt, Zambia Researchers Find Delirium in Hospitalized Patients Linked to Mortality, Disability in Sub-Saharan Africa
11-Feb-2021 11:20 AM EST
Vanderbilt, Zambia Researchers Find Delirium in Hospitalized Patients Linked to Mortality, Disability in Sub-Saharan Africa
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

Released: 10-Feb-2021 5:35 PM EST
Scientists uncover four new facts about early SARS-CoV-2 infections
University of Minnesota Duluth Medical School

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers studied SARS-CoV-2 infections at individual cellular levels and made four major discoveries about the virus, including one that validates the effectiveness of remdesivir - an FDA-approved antiviral drug - as a form of treatment for severe COVID-19 disease.

Newswise: COVID-19 Infections in The U.S. Nearly Three Times Greater Than Reported, Model Estimates
Released: 8-Feb-2021 4:20 PM EST
COVID-19 Infections in The U.S. Nearly Three Times Greater Than Reported, Model Estimates
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Feb. 8, 2021 – World health experts have long suspected that the incidence of COVID-19 has been higher than reported. Now, a machine-learning algorithm developed at UT Southwestern estimates that the number of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. since the pandemic began is nearly three times that of confirmed cases.

Newswise: New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses
Released: 8-Feb-2021 1:05 PM EST
New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers have identified a previously unknown site on the filovirus glycoprotein to which small drug molecules can bind and prevent infection -- blocking both sites may be more a more effective treatment with reduced risk of side effects.

Released: 4-Feb-2021 1:05 PM EST
Time management can work but in unexpected ways, according to new research
Concordia University

If you have a second, try typing "time management" into your favourite search engine.

Newswise: Pioneering technique paves way for fast and cheap fabrication of rapid medical diagnostic tools
3-Feb-2021 10:05 AM EST
Pioneering technique paves way for fast and cheap fabrication of rapid medical diagnostic tools
University of Bristol

New technology developed by the University of Bristol has the potential to accelerate uptake and development of on-chip diagnostic techniques in parts of the world where rapid diagnoses are desperately needed to improve public health, mortality and morbidity.

Released: 28-Jan-2021 2:40 PM EST
Risk analysis helps contend with uncertainty of in-person activities
Washington University in St. Louis

People now have access to better real-time information about COVID-19 infection and transmission rates, but they still have to decide what is safe to do. A new model co-authored by mathematician John McCarthy at Washington University in St. Louis helps to contend with the uncertainty.

20-Jan-2021 11:10 AM EST
UK public supports usage of tracking technology and immunity passports in global pandemic
University of Bristol

New research suggests the majority of people in the UK are willing to use privacy-encroaching tracking technology and support the introduction of ‘immunity passports’ to protect themselves and others in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: 253893_web.jpg
Released: 20-Jan-2021 11:50 AM EST
Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
University of Exeter

Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".

Newswise: Fish sex organs boosted under high-CO2
Released: 20-Jan-2021 8:05 AM EST
Fish sex organs boosted under high-CO2
University of Adelaide

Research from the University of Adelaide has found that some species of fish will have higher reproductive capacity because of larger sex organs, under the more acidic oceans of the future.

Newswise: How to Find Mutated Sperm? Just Go FISH
Released: 19-Jan-2021 11:50 AM EST
How to Find Mutated Sperm? Just Go FISH
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A test developed by Berkeley Lab scientists can quickly and easily detect whether sperm cells are carrying chromosomal defects, an advance that will help men who have undergone cancer treatment father healthy children.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:20 AM EST
Houston Methodist study finds males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females
Houston Methodist

A new Houston Methodist study found males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, have complications and die from the virus than females, independent of age. The peer-reviewed observational study appears in PLOS ONE, a multidisciplinary journal published by the Public Library of Science.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:55 AM EST
Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
PLOS

Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues.


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