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Article ID: 709481

Skin Patch for Children with Peanut Allergy Shows Benefit in Phase 3 Trial

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

After one year of wearing a peanut patch as immunotherapy for their peanut allergy, 35 percent of participating children (aged 4 to 11 years) were able to tolerate a significantly higher dose of peanuts before experiencing an allergic reaction, according to results from an international Phase 3 randomized clinical trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

Released:
12-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Mar-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 709254

Academic Performance of Urban Children with Asthma Worse Than Peers Without Asthma

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A new study shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, suffer academically. Kids who are kept home due to asthma symptoms often aren’t able to do as well in the classroom.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 709347

Gene Identified That Increases Risk of Antibiotic Reaction

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and colleagues have identified a gene that increases the risk for a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction to the commonly prescribed antibiotic vancomycin. Routine testing for this gene could improve patient safety and reduce unnecessary avoidance of other antibiotics, they reported in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Released:
8-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 709327

Vitamin D may protect against pollution-associated asthma symptoms in obese children

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

A new study finds vitamin D may be protective among asthmatic obese children living in urban environments with high indoor air pollution. The study out of John Hopkins University School of Medicine, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, was published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

Released:
8-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2019 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708247

Tattoo Complications May Warrant a Trip to the Doctor

American Academy of Dermatology

Research indicates that 10 percent of people with tattoos experience some sort of complication; a board-certified dermatologist can help these individuals.

Released:
26-Feb-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 708595

You probably don’t have a penicillin allergy

McMaster University

Nine out of 10 people who believe they’re allergic to the antibiotic either aren’t allergic or have only some intolerance, and eight of 10 people who had an allergic reaction to penicillin 10 or more years ago will now be fine.

Released:
25-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Feb-2019 2:15 PM EST

Article ID: 708433

Eating Small Amounts of Peanut after Immunotherapy May Extend Allergy Treatment Benefits

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC School of Medicine researcher Edwin Kim, MD, MS, says the results of a multi-year observational study are encouraging for those suffering from peanut allergies.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 9:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Feb-2019 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708567

Immunotherapy for Egg Allergy May Allow Patients to Eat Egg Safely for Years after Treatment

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC School of Medicine researcher Edwin Kim, MD, MS, says the results of a multi-year observational study are encouraging for those suffering from egg allergies.

Released:
22-Feb-2019 1:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Feb-2019 12:45 PM EST

Article ID: 708432

Likelihood of Tick Bite to Cause Red Meat Allergy Could Be Higher than Previously Thought

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC School of Medicine researcher Scott Commins, MD, PhD, and his team found the red meat allergy-causing alpha-gal – a sugar in nearly all mammal blood except for humans – is found in tick saliva regardless of whether the tick had recently fed on an animal, challenging previous theories.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 9:05 PM EST

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