Focus: NIH NIBIB Grant News

Filters close
Newswise: Researchers Create Light-Powered Yeast, Providing Insights Into Evolution, Biofuels, Cellular Aging
11-Jan-2024 12:05 PM EST
Researchers Create Light-Powered Yeast, Providing Insights Into Evolution, Biofuels, Cellular Aging
Georgia Institute of Technology

Georgia Tech researchers have engineered one of the world’s first yeast cells able to harness energy from light, expanding our understanding of the evolution of this trait — and paving the way for advancements in biofuel production and cellular aging.

Newswise: A shape-shifting robotic catheter could make heart surgery safer
Released: 8-Dec-2023 10:40 AM EST
A shape-shifting robotic catheter could make heart surgery safer
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A beating heart makes for a formidable surgical arena, but a new robotic catheter could someday equip surgeons to operate in the cardiac environment with greater ease.

Released: 5-Oct-2023 4:05 PM EDT
Ultrasensitive Blood Test Detects ‘Pan-Cancer’ Biomarker
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In a study co-led by investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, researchers developed a low-cost, ultrasensitive blood test to detect minute levels of a cancer biomarker that is highly specific to multiple common cancers.

Released: 31-Aug-2023 3:45 PM EDT
Coastal Fisheries Show Surprising Resilience to Marine Heat Waves
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers-led research found that marine heat waves – prolonged periods of unusually warm ocean temperatures – haven’t had a lasting effect on the fish communities that feed most of the world. The finding is in stark contrast to the devastating effects seen on other marine ecosystems cataloged by scientists after similar periods of warming, including widespread coral bleaching and harmful algal blooms.

Newswise: Artificial cells demonstrate that
Released: 5-Jul-2023 12:05 PM EDT
Artificial cells demonstrate that "life finds a way"
Indiana University

A study using a synthetic ‘minimal cell’ organism stripped down to the 'bare essentials' for life demonstrates the tenacity of organism's power to evolve and adapt, even in the face of an unnatural genome that would seemingly provide little flexibility.

   
Newswise: Scientists Design a Nanoparticle That May Improve mRNA Cancer Vaccines
Released: 28-Jun-2023 9:30 AM EDT
Scientists Design a Nanoparticle That May Improve mRNA Cancer Vaccines
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have developed a nanoparticle — an extremely tiny biodegradable container — that has the potential to improve the delivery of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA)-based vaccines for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, and vaccines for treating non-infectious diseases including cancer.

Newswise: Insight into brain’s waste clearing system may shed light on brain diseases
Released: 16-May-2023 2:35 PM EDT
Insight into brain’s waste clearing system may shed light on brain diseases
Washington University in St. Louis

Impairments in the lymphatic system may contribute to brain diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. Researchers have found a noninvasive and nonpharmaceutical method to influence glymphatic transport using focused ultrasound, opening the opportunity to use the method to further study brain diseases and brain function.

Newswise:Video Embedded at-home-videos-to-assess-musculoskeletal-health
VIDEO
Released: 21-Apr-2023 12:55 PM EDT
At-home videos to assess musculoskeletal health
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIH-funded researchers developed an online tool that can analyze self-collected, at-home videos with a smartphone. When deployed in a nationwide study, the tool could predict physical health and osteoarthritis of the knee or hip.

Newswise: Focused ultrasound technique leads to release of neurodegenerative disorders biomarkers
27-Jan-2023 3:10 PM EST
Focused ultrasound technique leads to release of neurodegenerative disorders biomarkers
Washington University in St. Louis

Using focused-ultrasound-mediated liquid biopsy in a mouse model released more tau proteins and another biomarker into the blood than without the intervention. This noninvasive method could facilitate diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise:Video Embedded computer-model-of-influenza-virus-shows-universal-vaccine-promise
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jan-2023 12:35 PM EST
Computer Model of Influenza Virus Shows Universal Vaccine Promise
University of California San Diego

For the first time, researchers at UC San Diego have created an atomic-level computer model of the H1N1 virus that reveals new vulnerabilities, suggesting possible strategies for the design of future vaccines and antivirals against influenza.

   
Newswise: Study reveals average age at conception for men versus women over past 250,000 years
Released: 6-Jan-2023 2:35 PM EST
Study reveals average age at conception for men versus women over past 250,000 years
Indiana University

Using a new method based upon comparing DNA mutation rates between parents and offspring, evolutionary biologists at Indiana University have for the first time revealed the average age of mothers versus fathers over the past 250,000 years, including the discovery that the age gap is shrinking, with women's average age at conception increasing from 23.2 years to 26.4 years, on average, in the past 5,000 years.

   
Newswise: Injectable, radioactive gel synergizes with chemotherapy to shrink pancreatic tumors
Released: 20-Dec-2022 12:25 PM EST
Injectable, radioactive gel synergizes with chemotherapy to shrink pancreatic tumors
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers are developing a new method to treat pancreatic cancer. In their study, they combined an injectable radioactive gel with systemic chemotherapy in multiple mouse models of the disease. The treatment resulted in tumor regression in all evaluated models, an unprecedented result for this genetically diverse and aggressive type of cancer.

Newswise: Temporary “tattoos” that measure blood pressure
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:20 PM EST
Temporary “tattoos” that measure blood pressure
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers are fine-tuning a wearable, cuffless blood pressure monitor. Made of graphene, one of the thinnest materials in the world, the device is worn on the underside of the wrist and can measure blood pressure with comparable accuracy to a standard blood pressure cuff.

Newswise: Study finds that artificial intelligence can determine race from medical images
Released: 19-Oct-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Study finds that artificial intelligence can determine race from medical images
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Researchers have found that AI models could accurately predict self-reported race in several types of medical images, suggesting that race information could be unknowingly incorporated into image analysis models.

Released: 22-Sep-2022 3:05 PM EDT
How Pitt biologists are making fieldwork more equitable
University of Pittsburgh

In a new publication, a team of biologists share their process for crafting a manual for field research that prioritizes safety for researchers from marginalized groups.

   
Released: 15-Sep-2022 11:05 AM EDT
NIH-funded team develops method to identify future SARS-CoV-2 mutations that could affect rapid antigen test performance
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A research team funded by the National Institutes of Health has shown that commercially available rapid antigen tests can detect past and present variants of concern and has identified potential mutations that may impact test performance in the future.

   
Newswise: Two Monumental Milestones Achieved in CT Imaging
Released: 12-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Two Monumental Milestones Achieved in CT Imaging
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Two biomedical imaging technologies developed with support from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have been cleared for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Both technologies offer advances in computed tomography (CT).

   
Newswise: Common Viruses May Be Triggering the Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease
Released: 29-Jul-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Common Viruses May Be Triggering the Onset of Alzheimer’s Disease
Tufts University

Two common viruses lie dormant in neurons – herpes simplex virus (HSV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV). Lab models of the human brain show that activation or re-infection of VZV can trigger neuroinflammation and wake up HSV, leading to accumulation of Alzheimer’s linked proteins and neural decline.

Released: 29-Jun-2022 11:00 AM EDT
NIH-funded project offers efficient approach when tracking SARS-CoV-2 variants
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

An interdisciplinary research team has developed a fast, cost-effective method to detect the circulation of SARS-CoV-2 variants. The approach can augment current surveillance methods that use comprehensive next-generation sequencing of virus samples, helping focus sequencing efforts on samples representing unknown and emerging variants.

   
Newswise: Magnetized killers for the treatment of solid tumors
Released: 28-Mar-2022 3:20 PM EDT
Magnetized killers for the treatment of solid tumors
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers are developing a method to activate natural killer cells using an external magnetic field, which not only enhances their cytotoxicity, but allows them to be tracked using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to verify that they’ve reached their target.

Newswise: Scaffolding Tumor Formation Sets the Stage for Better Immunotherapies
Released: 2-Mar-2022 4:50 PM EST
Scaffolding Tumor Formation Sets the Stage for Better Immunotherapies
Georgia Institute of Technology

By using a synthetic scaffold, Georgia Tech researchers created a novel way generate breast tumor models faster, more reliably, and with dramatically less immune variability than existing models - making them highly suitable for immunotherapy research.

Newswise: Scientists Regrow Frog’s Lost Leg
24-Jan-2022 9:50 AM EST
Scientists Regrow Frog’s Lost Leg
Tufts University

Scientists have triggered long-term growth of legs in adult frogs, which are naturally unable to regenerate limbs. The frogs regrew a lost leg over months, triggered by just 24 hour exposure to a five-drug cocktail held under a bioreactor. The new legs were functional enough to enable sensation and locomotion.

Newswise: New Color-Coded Test Quickly Reveals If Medical Nanoparticles Deliver Their Payload
Released: 5-Jan-2022 2:00 PM EST
New Color-Coded Test Quickly Reveals If Medical Nanoparticles Deliver Their Payload
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have developed a color-coded test that quickly signals whether newly developed nanoparticles — ultra small compartments designed to ferry medicines, vaccines and other therapies — deliver their cargo into target cells. The new testing tool, engineered specifically to test nanoparticles, could advance the search for next-generation biological medicines.

Newswise:Video Embedded sonothermogenetic-pulse-controls-mouse-behavior
VIDEO
Released: 23-Sep-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Sonothermogenetic pulse controls mouse behavior
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Bioengineers are using focused ultrasound to modulate motor activity in the brain without surgical device implantation, a first step toward non-invasive brain stimulation therapies.

   
Released: 17-Aug-2021 12:35 PM EDT
When it comes to innovation, this researcher is all ears
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB funding drives progress in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of middle ear infections

Released: 13-Aug-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Microbial Study Reveals Extended Lifespan of Starved Bacteria
Indiana University

Published research by Indiana University professor Jay Lennon's lab shows how bacteria can overcome starvation situations and survive for a long time, which has broader implications for chronic infections.

Released: 11-Aug-2021 11:35 AM EDT
NIBIB-Funded Bioengineers Hit Neurons with Targeted Ultrasound in Approach to Inhibit Pain
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIH-funded researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated the potential of a neuromodulation approach that uses low-intensity ultrasound energy, called transcranial focused ultrasound—or tFUS.

   
Released: 12-Jul-2021 1:50 PM EDT
MRI's Magnetic Field Affects Focused Ultrasound Technology
Washington University in St. Louis

A new finding prompts researchers, clinicians to consider this impact in future research and clinical treatment of brain diseases

   
Released: 7-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Precious Payloads
Georgia Institute of Technology

RNA-based drugs may change the standard of care for many diseases, making personalized medicine a reality. So far these cost-effective, easy-to-manufacture drugs haven’t been very useful in treating brain tumors and other brain disease. But a team of researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University has shown that a combination of ultrasound and RNA-loaded nanoparticles can temporarily open the protective blood-brain barrier, allowing the delivery of potent medicine to brain tumors.

4-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT
New MRI Technique Can Detect Early Dysfunction of the Blood-Brain Barrier Associated With Small Vessel Disease
University of Kentucky

Collaborative research between the University of Kentucky (UK) and University of Southern California (USC) suggests that a noninvasive neuroimaging technique may index early-stage blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction associated with small vessel disease (SVD).

12-Feb-2021 12:40 PM EST
New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor
University of California San Diego

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer’s levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. This one patch performs as well as commercial monitoring devices such as a blood pressure cuff, blood lactate meter, glucometer and breathalyzer.

   
Released: 7-Dec-2020 2:25 PM EST
NIH-funded tool helps organizations plan COVID-19 testing
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

The COVID-19 Testing Impact Calculator is a free resource that shows how different approaches to testing and other mitigation measures, such as mask use, can curb the spread of the virus in any organization.

     
1-Dec-2020 11:20 AM EST
Synthetic Biology and Machine Learning Speed the Creation of Lab-Grown Livers
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have combined synthetic biology with a machine learning algorithm to create human liver organoids with blood and bile handling systems. When implanted into mice with failing livers, the lab-grown replacement livers extended life.

   
31-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Editing the Immune Response Could Make Gene Therapy More Effective
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers created a system that uses CRISPR in a new way. Rather than acting on the genome to create permanent change, their system briefly suppresses genes specific to adenovirus antibody production, just long enough for the virus to deliver its gene therapy cargo unimpeded.

   
6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
DePaul University

A new study published in the journal New Phytologist from a research team led by environmental scientist Bala Chaudhary at DePaul University uncovered previously undiscovered patterns in the dispersal of mycorrhizal fungi that could help ecologists understand how these beneficial fungi travel.

4-May-2020 2:45 PM EDT
An artificial “tongue” of gold to taste maple syrup
Universite de Montreal

A chemistry professor at Université de Montréal, in Canada, has developed a new test using gold nanoparticles to establish the flavour profile of maple syrup and help producers evaluate its quality.

Released: 27-Apr-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Mini wiper blade enables clear view through minimally invasive surgical scope
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A team at ClearCam, Inc., with funding from the NIBIB and ties to the University of Texas at Austin, designed a device for wiping a laparoscope lens clean, much the same way that a wiper blade clears a fogged up window.

Released: 9-Apr-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Robot designed to simplify blood draws
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Bioengineers have created a blood-drawing robot that performed as well or better than technicians. The device could increase blood draw success from difficult- to-find veins and allow healthcare workers more time to treat patients.

Released: 24-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
New Tool for an Old Disease: Use of PET and CT Scans May Help Develop Shorter TB Treatment
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Experts believe that tuberculosis, or TB, has been a scourge for humans for some 15,000 years, with the first medical documentation of the disease coming out of India around 1000 B.C.E. Today, the World Health Organization reports that TB is still the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious agent, responsible for some 1.5 million fatalities annually. Primary treatment for TB for the past 50 years has remained unchanged and still requires patients to take multiple drugs daily for at least six months. Successful treatment with these anti-TB drugs — taken orally or injected into the bloodstream — depends on the medications “finding their way” into pockets of TB bacteria buried deep within the lungs.

Released: 15-Jan-2020 3:50 PM EST
NIH grant to improve neonatal brain injury detection using photoacoustic imaging technology
Wayne State University Division of Research

Wayne State University received a two-year, $725,000 R01 grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health for the development of a novel point-of-care 3D neonatal photoacoustic tomography (3D-nPAT) to improve the detection and measurement of hypoxic-ischemic in neonates without the need for sedation, radiation or radionuclides.

Released: 13-Nov-2019 8:00 AM EST
Johns Hopkins Launches Hub for Immunology and Engineering Research
Johns Hopkins Medicine

If the saying that two heads are better than one is true, then joining two fields of science may be better than one to spur more advances in medicine. With a $6.7 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers will bring together immunologists, oncologists and biomedical engineers in an effort to build new tools to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases.

26-Aug-2019 5:05 PM EDT
How to Simulate Softness
University of California San Diego

What factors affect how human touch perceives softness, like the feel of pressing your fingertip against a marshmallow, a piece of clay or a rubber ball? By exploring this question in detail, UC San Diego researchers discovered clever tricks to design materials that replicate different levels of perceived softness.

Released: 16-Aug-2019 9:35 AM EDT
Imaging a brain thinking, using a new MRI technique
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Brain function can be tracked in real-time using a new MRI method that has the potential to shed light on altered neuronal activity in brain diseases.

   
Released: 28-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Path paved for printing replacement organs
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Bioengineers have developed a 3D printing technique that creates the interacting networks for transport of air, blood, and other bodily fluids—a major step toward 3D printed replacement organs.

Released: 16-May-2019 8:50 AM EDT
Rapid ID of tumor cell metabolism aids treatment
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers used photoacoustic imaging for rapid measurement of metabolic rate of individual cells from breast tumors—information that can help guide treatment strategies.

6-May-2019 9:40 AM EDT
Damaged Lungs Regenerated in Study
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A new technique to rehabilitate lungs that are too damaged to be considered for transplant could benefit an increasing population of patients with end-stage lung disease.

25-Mar-2019 5:00 AM EDT
A Billion People Will Be Newly Exposed to Diseases Like Dengue Fever as World Temperatures Rise
Georgetown University Medical Center

As many as a billion people could be newly exposed to disease-carrying mosquitoes by the end of the century because of global warming, says a new study that examines temperature changes on a monthly basis across the world.

Released: 27-Mar-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Glowing Tumors Show Scientists Where Cancer Drugs Are Working
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of a cancer remain unaffected.

Released: 19-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Measuring Differences in Brain Chemicals in People with Mild Memory Problems
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using strong and targeted but noninvasive magnets at specific sites in the brains of people with and without mild learning and memory problems, Johns Hopkins researchers report they were able to detect differences in the concentrations of brain chemicals that transmit messages between neurons. The strength of these magnetic fields allows the researchers to measure tiny amounts and compare multiple brain metabolite levels at the same time. These studies may ultimately help to reveal what initiates memory decline and may, perhaps, even predict dementia risk. The researchers believe that measuring such data over time will allow them to more accurately detect and describe changes in metabolism in the brain as a person progresses from healthy to mild cognitive impairment and to dementia.

27-Feb-2019 4:15 PM EST
Shedding Light—Literally—on Resistance to Radiation Therapy
 Johns Hopkins University

A new Johns Hopkins study offers promise towards someday being able to non-invasively examine changes in cancerous tumors to determine whether they’ll respond to radiation treatment, before treatment even begins.


Showing results 1 – 50 of 108


close
1.0705