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Article ID: 704183

New Jersey Weather Observers Sought for Rutgers-Coordinated Network

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Do you want to help scientists at Rutgers University keep track of the weather in New Jersey? The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS), a nationwide volunteer network for observing precipitation, is seeking volunteer weather observers throughout the Garden State.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 5:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 704237

UCI and Singapore Researchers Find Source of 2015 Southeast Asia Smoke Cloud

University of California, Irvine

Smoke from widespread fires in Indonesia in the summer and fall of 2015 hung heavily over major urban centers in Southeast Asia, causing adverse health effects for millions of people. The afflicted could not have known that the polluted air they were breathing contained carbon from plants that were alive during the Middle Ages.

Released:
19-Nov-2018 3:30 PM EST
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Article ID: 702766

Super Typhoon #Yutu, Why Is It So Strong? Changing Ocean Salinity to Blame

Newswise

Increased rainfall from climate change is making the ocean less salty. The areas with the biggest decreases in salinity also experienced increasingly strong storms.

Released:
24-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701696

Solving a Plasma Physics Mystery: Magnetic Reconnection

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Magnetic reconnection causes space storms that can damage satellites and disrupt the grid. While it’s a common process in the universe, plasma physics researchers don’t fully understand why it occurs so abruptly and quickly. New research is supporting a theory that may hold the key.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701463

More Wet and Dry Weather Extremes Projected with Global Warming

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a Rutgers-led study. Those extremes include more frequent dry spells in the northwestern, central and southern United States and in Mexico, and more frequent heavy rainfall events in south Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula and southern China.

Released:
4-Oct-2018 5:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 697558

Human Influence Detected in Changing Seasonal Cycles

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

For the first time, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and five other organizations have shown that human influences significantly impact the size of the seasonal cycle of temperature in the lowest layer of the atmosphere.

Released:
19-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT

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