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Newswise: 206756_web.jpg

Article ID: 716252

North Carolina coastal flooding is worsening with climate change, population growth

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A historic 120-year-old data set is allowing researchers to confirm what data modeling systems have been predicting about climate change: Climate change is increasing precipitation events like hurricanes, tropical storms and floods.

Released:
23-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Garlic on Broccoli: A Smelly Approach to Repel a Major Pest
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jul-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 716116

Garlic on Broccoli: A Smelly Approach to Repel a Major Pest

University of Vermont

A University of Vermont study offers a novel framework to test strategies for managing invasive pests. Applying the framework to swede midge, a new invasive fly causing 100% crop losses for organic broccoli growers, the researchers have uncovered which odors are most effective at repelling the pest.

Released:
21-Jul-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Crunching the Numbers of Cancer Metastasis

Article ID: 715931

Crunching the Numbers of Cancer Metastasis

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a study published in Scientific Reports, first author Yamicia D. Connor, MD, PhD, a resident in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues, reveal that unlike non-metastatic cells, breast metastatic cells have the ability to change shape, flattening to more effectively cross the endothelium and into the blood stream.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings

Article ID: 715848

Effectiveness of using natural enemies to combat pests depends on surroundings

Cornell University

A new study of cabbage crops in New York – a state industry worth close to $60 million in 2017, according to the USDA – reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field.

Released:
15-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 715717

'The way you move': Body structure brings coordinated movement

Hokkaido University

Scientists at Hokkaido University and Hiroshima University have found that green brittle stars with five arms show a different "pumping" movement pattern than those with six arms.

Released:
12-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Growth Failure in Preterm Infants Tied to Altered Gut Bacteria

Article ID: 715502

Growth Failure in Preterm Infants Tied to Altered Gut Bacteria

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Extremely premature infants who fail to grow as expected have delayed development of their microbiome, or communities of bacteria and other micro-organisms living in the gut, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. Analysis of these infants’ metabolism revealed that their bodies are responding as if they were fasting, despite caloric intake similar to extremely premature infants with appropriate growth. The study findings also suggest that the unique makeup of the microbiome in infants with growth failure might contribute to their inability to properly metabolize nutrients.

Released:
9-Jul-2019 4:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 715498

Cyborg-like microchip valve driven by earthworm muscle

RIKEN

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have developed the first microchip valve powered by living cells.

Released:
9-Jul-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: The Ancestor of the Great White Shark

Article ID: 715353

The Ancestor of the Great White Shark

University of Vienna

Mackerel sharks (Lamniformes) are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark (the fastest shark in the world), the infamous great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark that has ever roamed  the world’s oceans.

Released:
5-Jul-2019 4:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 205339_web.jpg

Article ID: 715332

Winter monsoons became stronger during geomagnetic reversal

Kobe University

New evidence suggests that high-energy particles from space known as galactic cosmic rays affect the Earth's climate by increasing cloud cover, causing an "umbrella effect".

Released:
3-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT

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