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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689614

Birds and Beans: Study Shows Which Type of Coffee Plantations Are Best for Bird Diversity

Wildlife Conservation Society

Which is better for bird diversity: Arabica or Robusta beans?

Released:
15-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Agriculture, All Journal News, Birds, Plants, Scientific Reports, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro

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Article ID: 689489

Rutgers-Led Innovation Could Spur Faster, Cheaper, Nano-Based Manufacturing

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Engineers at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and Oregon State University are developing a new method of processing nanomaterials that could lead to faster and cheaper manufacturing of flexible thin film devices – from touch screens to window coatings, according to a new study. The “intense pulsed light sintering” method uses high-energy light over an area nearly 7,000 times larger than a laser to fuse nanomaterials in seconds.

Released:
14-Feb-2018 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689153

Placebo Pills Prescribed Honestly Help Cancer Survivors Manage Symptoms

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Fatigue in cancer survivors is significantly reduced by placebo pill, even when it is known it is a fake pill.

Released:
7-Feb-2018 12:45 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 689234

Special UV Light Safely Kills Airborne Flu Virus, Finds Study

Columbia University Medical Center

Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, found researchers at Columbia University. The lighting may offer a new weapon against the spread of flu virus in public spaces.

Released:
8-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 689093

A Blueprint for Future Blood-Nerve Barrier and Peripheral Nerve Disease Research

University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers have detailed, for the first time, the normal human transcriptome of the blood-nerve barrier. This barrier — a tight covering of endothelial cells — maintains the microenvironment of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of the transcriptome will aid research in peripheral nerve disease.

Released:
6-Feb-2018 3:30 PM EST
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Blood Disorders, Scientific Reports, All Journal News, Grant Funded News

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Article ID: 688679

Rutgers Engineers 3D Print Shape-Shifting Smart Gel

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers engineers have invented a “4D printing” method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of “living” structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.

Released:
31-Jan-2018 5:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688623

Colorado Potato Beetle Genome Gives Insight Into Major Agricultural Pest

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A team of scientists led by University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologist Sean Schoville sequenced the Colorado potato beetle's genome, probing its genes for clues to its surprising adaptability to new environments and insecticides. The new information sheds light on how this insect jumps to new plant hosts and handles toxins, and it will help researchers explore more ways to control the beetle.

Released:
29-Jan-2018 2:05 PM EST
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Agriculture, All Journal News, Plants, Scientific Reports

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Article ID: 688557

Researchers Use Synthetic Protein to Disrupt Work of Bacteria

SUNY Upstate Medical University

A synthetic protein that disrupts the ability of bacteria to perform basic life functions—moving, eating, attaching to hosts—could be a key to fighting infectious disease and preventing bacteria from evolving into drug-resistant pathogens.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 1:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Cell Biology, Genetics, Infectious Diseases, Scientific Reports, Local - New York

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Article ID: 688490

Repurposed Drug Found to Be Effective Against Zika Virus

University of California San Diego Health

In both cell cultures and mouse models, a drug used to treat Hepatitis C effectively protected and rescued neural cells infected by the Zika virus — and blocked transmission of the virus to mouse fetuses. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil and elsewhere, say their findings support further investigation of using the repurposed drug as a potential treatment for Zika-infected adults, including pregnant women.

Released:
25-Jan-2018 11:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Women's Health, Zika Virus, Pharmaceuticals, Scientific Reports, Local - California

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Article ID: 688470

The Eye Is Not Immune to Immunity

Thomas Jefferson University

Contrary to long-established dogma, the eye can host an active immune response that could both heal injury and contribute to loss of vision.

Released:
25-Jan-2018 8:05 AM EST
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All Journal News, Surgery, Transplantation, Vision, Scientific Reports, Local - Pennsylvania


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