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Article ID: 706722

The science of sway: Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance

McMaster University

A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music.

Released:
18-Jan-2019 8:05 AM EST

Arts and Humanities

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Article ID: 706656

Breaking Barriers in Solar Energy

University of Delaware

Improving the electron traffic in solar cells to achieve the big breakthrough needed to capture the sun's energy efficiently. That's what the Vapor Transport Deposition System is all about.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 706351

Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey

University of Edinburgh

Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago.

Released:
11-Jan-2019 11:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 705940

Stem Cell Signal Drives New Bone Building

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building.

Released:
7-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705286

An Energy-Efficient Way to Stay Warm: Sew High-Tech Heating Patches to Your Clothes

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes – while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint? Engineers at Rutgers and Oregon State University have found a cost-effective way to make thin, durable heating patches by using intense pulses of light to fuse tiny silver wires with polyester. Their heating performance is nearly 70 percent higher than similar patches created by other researchers, according to a Rutgers-led study in Scientific Reports.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 5:00 AM EST

Article ID: 705062

Schizophrenia Is Linked to Lack of Vitamin D in The Womb; Expert Reacts

Catholic Health Services of Long Island

Today, a study was shared that claims “Schizophrenia Is Linked to Lack of Vitamin D in The Womb." Dr. Ronald Brenner, chief of the behavioral health services line at Catholic Health Services, who wasn’t involved in this study, reacted to this news and shared his expert thoughts.

Released:
6-Dec-2018 1:05 PM EST

Article ID: 705048

Link between newborns with vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed

Aarhus University

Newborns with Vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, researchers from Aarhus University and the University of Queensland report. The discovery could prevent some cases of the disease, and shows that neonatal vitamin D deficiency could possibly account for about 8 per cent of all schizophrenia cases in Denmark.

Released:
6-Dec-2018 12:10 PM EST
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Article ID: 704859

New Cancer Immunotherapy Approach Turns Immune Cells into Tiny Anti-Tumor Drug Factories

University of California San Diego Health

In lab and mouse experiments, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a method to leverage B cells to manufacture and secrete tumor-suppressing microRNAs.

Released:
4-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

Article ID: 704782

Babies kicking in the womb are creating a map of their bodies

University College London

The kicks a mother feels from her unborn child may allow the baby to 'map' their own body and enable them to eventually explore their surroundings, suggests new research led by UCL in collaboration with UCLH.

Released:
3-Dec-2018 12:20 PM EST
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Article ID: 704750

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates

University of Adelaide

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these ‘natural’ or ‘wild’ yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers.

Released:
2-Dec-2018 10:05 PM EST

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