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Green in tooth and claw

Washington University in St. Louis

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors’ diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and potentially for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Oral Health, Scientific Reports,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST
Newswise: Fossil Is the Oldest-Known Scorpion

Fossil Is the Oldest-Known Scorpion

Ohio State University

Scientists studying fossils collected 35 years ago have identified them as the oldest-known scorpion species, a prehistoric animal from about 437 million years ago. The researchers found that the animal likely had the capacity to breathe in both ancient oceans and on land.

Channels: Environmental Science, Nature, Paleontology, Wildlife, Staff Picks, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Research Results

Sugar changes the chemistry of your brain

Aarhus University

The idea of food addiction is a very controversial topic among scientists. Researchers from Aarhus University have delved into this topic and examined what happens in the brains of pigs when they drink sugar water.

Channels: Addiction, Behavioral Science, Food and Water Safety, Health Food, Neuro, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerpick test

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can detect low-glucose levels via ECG without fingerpick test

University of Warwick

Tracking sugar in the blood is crucial for both healthy individuals and diabetic patients. Current methods to measure glucose requires needles and repeated fingerpicks over the day. Fingerpicks can often be painful, deterring patient compliance

Channels: All Journal News, Artificial Intelligence, Pain, Technology, Scientific Reports,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 6:20 AM EST
Research Results
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100 million years in amber: Researchers discover oldest fossilized slime mold

University of Göttingen

Most people associate the idea of creatures trapped in amber with insects or spiders, which are preserved lifelike in fossil tree resin.

Channels: All Journal News, Evolution and Darwin, Geology, Paleontology, Scientific Reports,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: New study unravels the complexity of childhood obesity

New study unravels the complexity of childhood obesity

University of Notre Dame

In a new study led by the University of Notre Dame, researchers examined how various psychological characteristics of children struggling with their weight, such as loneliness, anxiety and shyness, combined with similar characteristics of their parents or guardians and family dynamics affect outcomes of nutritional intervention.

Channels: Children's Health, Diabetes, Family and Parenting, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight Loss, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
6-Jan-2020 3:20 PM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Scientists Map Structural Proteins Across an Ovary, Another Step Toward “Ink” Development for 3-D Printing a Bioprosthetic Ovary

Scientists Map Structural Proteins Across an Ovary, Another Step Toward “Ink” Development for 3-D Printing a Bioprosthetic Ovary

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

For the first time, scientists identified and mapped the location of structural proteins in a pig ovary. Ongoing development of an “ink” with these proteins will be used for 3-D printing an artificial (or bio-prosthetic) ovary that could be implanted and allow a woman to have a child. Findings were recently published in Scientific Reports.

Channels: Cancer, Engineering, OBGYN, Women's Health, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
6-Jan-2020 10:35 AM EST
Research Results
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Investigadores de Mayo Clinic ven el período posterior a la menopausia como factor clave en el cáncer de endometrio

Mayo Clinic

El cáncer de endometrio es el más común de los cánceres ginecológicos en Estados Unidos y el cuarto más frecuente en las mujeres. Además, debido a que las tasas de incidencia del cáncer de endometrio van en aumento en el mundo occidental, eso plantea que los cambios en los factores ambientales, como la alimentación, el estilo de vida y el microbioma vaginal, pueden ser razones importantes para su causa.

Channels: Cancer, Microbiome, OBGYN, Women's Health, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
3-Jan-2020 3:05 PM EST
Research Results
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Pesquisadores da Mayo Clinic consideram a pós-menopausa um fator-chave no câncer de endométrio

Mayo Clinic

O câncer de endométrio é a doença ginecológica mais comum nos EUA e o quarto câncer mais comum entre as mulheres. Além disso, as taxas de incidência de câncer de endométrio estão crescendo no Ocidente, indicando que alterações nos fatores ambientais, como dieta, estilo de vida e o microbioma vaginal, podem ser catalisadores importantes da causa da doença.

Channels: Cancer, Microbiome, OBGYN, Women's Health, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
3-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results
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ينظر الباحثون في Mayo Clinic إلى مرحلة ما بعد انقطاع الطمث كعامل رئيسي في سرطان بطانة الرحم

Mayo Clinic

سرطان بطانة الرحم هو أكثر الأورام الخبيثة شيوعًا في أمراض النساء في الولايات المتحدة ورابع أكثر أنواع السرطان شيوعًا بين النساء. بالإضافة إلى ذلك ، فإن معدلات الإصابة بسرطان بطانة الرحم آخذة في الارتفاع في العالم الغربي، مما يشير إلى أن التغيرات في العوامل البيئية مثل النظام الغذائي ونمط الحياة و الحَيُّوم الدقيق المهبلي قد تكون من العوامل المهمة في سببه.

Channels: Cancer, Microbiome, OBGYN, Women's Health, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
3-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results


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