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Article ID: 695044

Researchers Image Cellular Damage Done by Diabetic Retinopathy

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A new technique offers a 'molecular fingerprint' for functional groups, such as proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, which can signal the development of retinal disease

Released:
23-May-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694838

Dogs Born in the Summertime More Likely to Suffer Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit.

Released:
18-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694680

Colon Cancer Cells Use Mysterious RNA Strands to Avoid Cell Death

Case Western Reserve University

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have discovered how unusually long strands of RNA help colon cancer cells avoid death, allowing unregulated growth. Unlike other RNAs, the intriguing strands do not appear to encode proteins and are termed “long non-coding RNAs” or “lincRNAs.”A new study showed some lincRNAs could be targeted by drug developers to halt colon cancer.

Released:
16-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694481

Dozens of Binaries From Milky Way’s Globular Clusters Could Be Detectable by LISA

Northwestern University

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A string of detections -- four more binary black holes and a pair of neutron stars -- soon followed the Sept. 14, 2015, observation. Now, another detector is being built to crack this window wider open. This next-generation observatory, called LISA, is expected to be in space in 2034, and it will be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

Released:
11-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694371

UCLA-Led Research Finds Vaccines Against Anthrax, Plague and Tularemia Are Effective in Mice

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Anthrax, plague and tularemia are three potent agents terrorists would be likely to use in an attack, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each is highly and quickly lethal to humans. But there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and plague, and although there is an anthrax vaccine, it requires a burdensome immunization schedule and has severe side effects.

Released:
10-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694333

How the Power of Mathematics Can Help Assess Lung Function

University of Southampton

Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analysing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other lung diseases.

Released:
10-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694266

New Gene Therapy Sparks Healthy Heart Beats

Cornell University

Michael Kotlikoff, provost of Cornell University and a professor of molecular physiology, is part of an international collaboration that is aiming to prevent heart arrhythmias with a simple gene-therapy approach.

Released:
9-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694185

Understanding Steam Burns

Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Even if the wound looks superficially harmless, steam burns must be cooled persistently. Empa researchers have now been able to show for the first time how hot steam achieves its vicious effect: It penetrates the upper skin layer and can cause severe burns in the lower skin layers - initially almost invisible.

Released:
8-May-2018 8:40 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694183

Prolonged Exposure to Air Pollution Leads to Genetic Changes in Rat Brains, Study Finds

Cedars-Sinai

Prolonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. While previous research has documented the association between air pollution and a variety of diseases, including cancer, the study found markers indicating certain materials in coarse air pollution—nickel, in particular—may play a role in genetic changes related to disease development, said Julia Ljubimova, MD, PhD.

Released:
8-May-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693972

Mercury Rising: Are the Fish We Eat Toxic?

Universite de Montreal

Canadian researchers say industrial sea fishing may be exposing people in coastal and island nations to excessively high levels of mercury.

Released:
3-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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