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Article ID: 713098

Sedimentary, dear Johnson: Is NASA looking at the wrong rocks for clues to Martian life?

Frontiers

In 2020, NASA and European-Russian missions will look for evidence of past life on Mars.

Released:
17-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 712458

Comfortably to Simulated Mars

Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

In cooperation with Empa, the Austrian Space Forum (ÖFW) is developing the "Serenity" space suit - a prototype for a Mars suit. The two partners have now signed a cooperation agreement to work even more closely together on the development of the prototype. The cooperation focuses on optimising the wearing comfort and heat regulation system of "Serenity" based on body models developed at Empa.

Released:
7-May-2019 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711627

Florida Tech to Host Space Technology Day May 23

Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR)

The Florida Tech Office of Research in collaboration with NASA will host Space Technology Day on the university’s Melbourne campus Thursday, May 23. This free, daylong event will bring together professors, students, engineers, technologists and business leaders from around Florida to engage on NASA’s current and future space technology activities and the agency’s plans for exploring the Moon, Mars and beyond.

Released:
19-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711483

New SmartSuit promises a better fit for astronauts

Texas A&M University

A new intelligent hybrid SmartSuit design proposed by Dr. Ana Diaz Artiles from Texas A&M University has the potential to solve some of the current design and health risks associated with the current spacesuit worn by astronauts.

Released:
17-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 710497

New Evidence of Deep Groundwater on Mars

University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering

Researchers at the USC Arid Climate and Water Research Center (AWARE) have published a study that suggests deep groundwater could still be active on Mars and could originate surface streams in some near-equatorial areas on Mars. The researchers at USC have determined that groundwater likely exists in a broader geographical area than just the poles of Mars and that there is an active system, as deep as 750 meters, from which groundwater comes to the surface through cracks in the specific craters they analyzed.

Released:
29-Mar-2019 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709927

SCOPE project scoops $16 million EU grant

University of Adelaide

A University of Adelaide researcher, alongside members of an international team, has won an AU$16 million ERC Synergy Grant to use plasma energy to produce fertilisers which provides the opportunity for new business models and could even lead to crops on Mars.

Released:
19-Mar-2019 9:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709763

Trembling Aspen Leaves Could Save Future Mars Rovers

University of Warwick

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-2019 10:00 AM EST

Article ID: 709174

Mission Critical: McMaster Scientists Tackle Major Challenges to Sending Astronauts to Search for Life on Mars

McMaster University

An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster’s School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there?

Released:
6-Mar-2019 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 707966

Early “Fossils” Formed by Tectonics, not Life

Department of Energy, Office of Science

The 3.7-billion-year-old structures were considered the first evidence for life on the planet; new evidence suggests differently.

Released:
19-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST

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