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Released: 1-Oct-2020 6:15 PM EDT
Tip Sheet: Cancer health disparities, app to stop smoking, diversity in COVID-19 vaccine trials — and more
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

SEATTLE – Oct. 1, 2020 – Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.And if you’re looking for sources for October’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month, please see our breast cancer page for a list of projects, experts and the latest breast cancer news.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 6:05 PM EDT
2020 Bayer Diversity Fund provides professional opportunities to underrepresented groups
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

The American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America and Soil Science Society of America announce a new collaboration with Bayer and MANRRS.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 5:20 PM EDT
University of Utah establishes Partners for Innovation, Ventures, Outreach & Technology (PIVOT) Center
University of Utah

The PIVOT Center is a centralized office that will drive the U’s expanding efforts for economic engagement for the greater Utah community.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 5:05 PM EDT
WashU Expert: Judge Barrett’s religion not a confirmation issue
Washington University in St. Louis

Questions about Amy Coney Barrett’s religious affiliation and beliefs have dominated public discourse since President Donald Trump announced that she was his pick to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat left vacant by Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s passing. While her faith is considered controversial by some, should it impact her confirmation?John Inazu, the Sally D.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:40 PM EDT
COVID-19 antibodies in donated plasma decline within first months after symptom onset
American Society of Hematology (ASH)

Although there is still uncertainty about the clinical benefits and role of convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19, new research suggests that the earlier plasma is collected after the donor's recovery from COVID-19, the better, as antibodies start to disappear after three months of symptom onset.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:35 PM EDT
ESO telescope spots galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole
European Southern Observatory (ESO)

With the help of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have found six galaxies lying around a supermassive black hole when the Universe was less than a billion years old.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Special issue of AJPH tackles Health Misinformation on Social Media
American Public Health Association (APHA)

This month's issue of AJPH tackles health misinformation that has run rampant on social media during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Alien species to increase by 36% worldwide by 2050
University College London

The number of alien (non-native) species, particularly insects, arthropods and birds, is expected to increase globally by 36% by the middle of this century, compared to 2005, finds new research by an international team involving UCL.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Are Organ Transplant Recipients at Greater Risk of Death from COVID-19?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study analyzes death risk from COVID-19 in organ transplant recipients and finds one treatment method greatly increased the risk.

Newswise: UIC earns ‘Seal of Excelencia’ for commitment to Latino students’ success
Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:25 PM EDT
UIC earns ‘Seal of Excelencia’ for commitment to Latino students’ success
University of Illinois at Chicago

The University of Illinois Chicago has earned Excelencia in Education’s “Seal of Excelencia,” a national certification that recognizes colleges and universities for their “unwavering commitment to intentionally serve Latino students, while serving all.”UIC is one of five higher education institutions selected for the distinction, which was announced today during a press conference in Washington, D.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Carb-eating bacteria under viral threat
University of California, Riverside

Strictly speaking, humans cannot digest complex carbohydrates -- that's the job of bacteria in our large intestines. UC Riverside scientists have just discovered a new group of viruses that attack these bacteria.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Dementia caregivers' stress leads to sleep deprivation
Edith Cowan University

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found 94 per cent of Australians caring for a loved one with dementia are sleep deprived.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Webinar: Do Investors Care About Carbon Risk?
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Imperial College of London professors Marcin Kacperczyk and Patrick Bolton (also of Columbia University) discuss findings in their NBER working paper, “Do Investors Care About Carbon Risk?

Newswise: Vaccine Opposition Online Uniting Around ‘Civil Liberties’ Argument
1-Oct-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Vaccine Opposition Online Uniting Around ‘Civil Liberties’ Argument
George Washington University

Anti-vaccination discourse on Facebook increased in volume over the last decade, coalescing around the argument that refusing to vaccinate is a civil right, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Public Health.

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30-Sep-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Influence of bots on spreading vaccine information not as big as you think
University of Sydney

The role of bots in spreading vaccine-critical information on Twitter is limited, and rarely cross paths with active Twitter users, finds study led by University of Sydney.

Newswise: CFES Brilliant Pathways Partners with Colgate-Palmolive to Mentor Over 1,200 Students on College and Career Readiness
Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:55 PM EDT
CFES Brilliant Pathways Partners with Colgate-Palmolive to Mentor Over 1,200 Students on College and Career Readiness
CFES Brilliant Pathways

CFES Brilliant Pathways and Colgate-Palmolive joined forces on September 30 for a day of e-mentoring over 1,200 students in 16 schools across New York and Florida with a focus on college and career readiness.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 infects majority of bad dreams -- study
Frontiers

COVID-19 has turned 2020 into a nightmare for many people, as they struggle with health problems, economic uncertainty and other challenges.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Decent living for all does not have to cost the Earth
University of Leeds

Global energy consumption in 2050 could be reduced to the levels of the 1960s and still provide a decent standard of living for a population three times larger, according to a new study.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Black Lives Also Matter in Cancer Care
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Studies have long reported that Black cancer patients have poorer outcomes than their white counterparts.

Newswise: UC San Diego Health Joins International Clinical Trial to Test Coronavirus Vaccine
Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
UC San Diego Health Joins International Clinical Trial to Test Coronavirus Vaccine
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego Health will be a test site for a third, major Phase III clinical trial to assess a vaccine candidate for the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Sponsored by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, the trial will recruit up to 60,000 participants at sites in the United States and worldwide.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:20 PM EDT
AANA Joins Healthcare Professionals Calling for Mental Health Resources
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) has partnered with more than 50 national healthcare and mental health awareness organizations to support the introduction of the “Dr. Lorna Breen Health Care Provider Protection Act” (H.R. 8094) that supports behavioral health and well-being among healthcare professionals.

Newswise: 15-Year Trend Persists in Disparate Insulin Pump Use in Children
Released: 1-Oct-2020 3:05 PM EDT
15-Year Trend Persists in Disparate Insulin Pump Use in Children
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Insulin pumps are widely used in the management of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and reviews have shown insulin pump therapy to be associated with improved glycemic control, fewer severe hypoglycemia events, and improved quality of life. Yet, non-Hispanic white children (NHW) are more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic Black children (NHB) to use this technology.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Strict parenting may cause adolescents to act out
University of Georgia

The next time you’re yelling at your defiant teen, you might consider that you may be doing more harm than good, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

Newswise: Shedding Light on Stellar Evolution
Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Shedding Light on Stellar Evolution
Department of Energy, Office of Science

After burning their fuel, most stars become white dwarf stars. The high-energy-density states in these stars are extremely difficult to reach and characterize in the laboratory. Now, scientists have conducted new experiments on these high-pressure conditions using the world’s most energetic laser.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Being a Selfish Jerk Doesn’t Get You Ahead, Research Finds
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

The evidence is in: Nice guys and gals don’t finish last, and being a selfish jerk doesn’t get you ahead. That’s the clear conclusion from research that tracked disagreeable people—those with selfish, combative, manipulative personalities—from college or graduate school to where they landed in their careers about 14 years later.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
UC San Diego Partners with San Ysidro Health to Expand COVID-19 Testing
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with local partners, have been awarded a $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to implement a program of widespread testing for COVID-19 in San Ysidro, focused on pregnant women and children.

Newswise: Promising COVID-19 Rapid Test Technology Enters Phase 1 of NIH Challenge
Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Promising COVID-19 Rapid Test Technology Enters Phase 1 of NIH Challenge
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A promising new COVID-19 rapid-testing technology platform developed by Rover Diagnostics and Columbia Engineering has been selected by the NIH to enter Phase 1 of the RADx initiative to support new COVID-19 testing technologies. The affordable, portable, and ultrafast point-of-care Rover platform provides reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction results in eight minutes, faster than any other test of its kind, with targeted accuracy to match laboratory-based tests.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Canisius College Class Ring - Lost 45 Years Ago - Returned to Its Owner
Canisius College

Some things defy all odds. It was nearly 45 years ago when Canisius College alumnus (Ret.) Lt. Col. James McNicholas lost his class ring somewhere outside his home in El Paso, TX, where he was stationed with the U.S. Army. The ring never turned up. Until recently.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Joanne Chory wins the 2020 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize
Rockefeller University

oanne Chory, who pioneered the application of molecular genetics to plant biology and transformed our understanding of photosynthesis, will receive the 2020 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, the preeminent international award recognizing outstanding women scientists.

30-Sep-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Researchers call for loss of smell to be recognized globally as a symptom of COVID-19
PLOS

Four out of five people experiencing the recent loss of smell and/or taste tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies—and of those who tested positive, 40 percent did not have cough or fever, reports a new study in PLOS Medicine by Prof. Rachel Batterham at University College London and colleagues.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-cells-build-organisms
VIDEO
28-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
How Cells Build Organisms
Harvard Medical School

Harvard scientists discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering .

Newswise: Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
30-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Building an antiracist lab: Scientists offer steps to take action now
DePaul University

“Ten simple rules for building an antiracist lab,” is the subject of a paper by scientists at DePaul University in Chicago and the University of California in Merced. The paper is published Oct. 1 in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:55 PM EDT
There is no evidence to support claims that the ballots were disposed of by mail carriers in Pennsylvania
Newswise

Diamond and Silk—the former Fox Nation online personalities, claim that the recently discovered nine discarded ballots in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania were tossed out by anti-Trump United States Postal Service mail carriers. The pair shared the article on social media where it received thousands of likes and shares.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:35 PM EDT
COVID vs. Flu vs. Common Cold: What You Need to Know
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

With cold and flu season underway, plus the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, infectious disease specialist Jeffrey Bender, MD, shares how to tell the difference between the three illnesses, and the most important thing parents can do to keep children safe.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:35 PM EDT
UB awarded grant to help pharmacies build community health worker programs
University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo researchers have received a grant from the Community Pharmacy Foundation to help add community health workers to pharmacies to better connect patients to critical services and lower health care costs.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Population distribution can greatly impact COVID-19 spread, UCI-led study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 1, 2020 — Uneven population distribution can significantly impact the severity and timing of COVID-19 infections within a city or county, leading individual communities to have vastly different experiences with the pandemic, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine. Findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences show that the heterogeneous spatial features of interpersonal connections may produce dramatic local variations in exposures to those with the illness.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Arizona State University researchers awarded $4.7M by NIH to expand COVID-19 testing in underserved Arizona communities
Arizona State University (ASU)

In Arizona, as in other parts of the country, data shows that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected the American Indian, African American and Latinx communities, as well as other vulnerable populations. A $4.7 million grant from the National Institute of Health to ASU’s Southwest Interdisciplinary Research Center (SIRC) is on the way to help address this by funding a rapid and large-scale increase in COVID-19 testing of underserved communities across Arizona.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
High risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with COVID-19
Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Wien)

In a systematic review of the worldwide published data on "Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in COVID-19 patients", Cihan Ay, Stephan Nopp, and Florian Moik from the Department of Medicine I, Clinical Division of Haematology and Haemostaseology, now for the first time, provide an in-depth analysis on the risk of VTE in patients hospitalised for COVID-19.

Newswise: Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Study reveals element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A new study published in the journal Critical Care Explorations shows for the first time that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of a naturally circulating element in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions.

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Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:30 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

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Embargo will expire: 5-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: MSU, USDA Agricultural Research Service celebrate new partnership, “Atlas” supercomputer housed in Starkville
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:25 PM EDT
MSU, USDA Agricultural Research Service celebrate new partnership, “Atlas” supercomputer housed in Starkville
Mississippi State University

Building on decades of successful collaborations, Mississippi State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service celebrated the new “Atlas” supercomputer Wednesday [Sept. 30] with a virtual event.

Newswise: Ecological Restoration Institute to lead new center aimed at building a skilled workforce to help with forest management
Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Ecological Restoration Institute to lead new center aimed at building a skilled workforce to help with forest management
Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University forestry professor Han-Sup Han is leading the creation of the Forest Operations Training Center, which aims to make use of abundant forest resources in Coconino County, the need to properly manage those forests and the need for workers who are trained in the necessary skillsets.

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Released: 1-Oct-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Why writing by hand makes kids smarter
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Professor Audrey van der Meer at NTNU believes that national guidelines should be put into place to ensure that children receive at least a minimum of handwriting training.

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Embargo will expire: 6-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 1-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 6-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Fact-checking Trump's Claim that Mail-in Ballots Will Lead to a ‘Rigged’ Election
Newswise

In the first debate between incumbant President Donald Trump and the Democratic nominee, Former Vice President Joe Biden, Trump reiterated that mail-in ballots lead to voter fraud and will lead to a rigged election. This claim is false. There is no evidence that mail-in ballots are rigging the election. "Unsolicited" mail-in ballots have been used for years in several states, with little to no evidence of voter fraud.


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