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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Apr-2021 5:45 PM EDT

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Released: 13-Apr-2021 5:05 PM EDT
The Chillest Ape: How Humans Evolved A Super-High Cooling Capacity
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Humans have a uniquely high density of sweat glands embedded in their skin—10 times the density of chimpanzees and macaques. Now, researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered how this distinctive, hyper-cooling trait evolved in the human genome.

Newswise: Movement disorders and neurogenerative diseases clinic at UTHealth Neurosciences receives new designation as regional Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America
Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:40 PM EDT
Movement disorders and neurogenerative diseases clinic at UTHealth Neurosciences receives new designation as regional Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

In recognition of collaboration with health care teams throughout the state, the movement disorders and neurogenerative diseases clinic at UTHealth Neurosciences was designated a regional Center of Excellence (COE) by the Huntington’s Disease Society of America (HDSA), the only one in Texas and one of just four Level 1 COEs in the country. UTHealth Neurosciences is the clinical practice of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock Hard Skeletons
Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:30 PM EDT
Corals Carefully Organize Proteins to Form Rock Hard Skeletons
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Charles Darwin, the British naturalist who championed the theory of evolution, noted that corals form far-reaching structures, largely made of limestone, that surround tropical islands. He didn’t know how they performed this feat. Now, Rutgers scientists have shown that coral structures consist of a biomineral containing a highly organized organic mix of proteins that resembles what is in our bones. Their study, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, shows for the first time that several proteins are organized spatially – a process that’s critical to forming a rock-hard coral skeleton.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Study: Ag policy in India needs to account for domestic workload
Cornell University

Women’s increased agricultural labor during harvest season, in addition to domestic house care, often comes at the cost of their health, according to new research from the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
DHS Partners with DWX to Advance Homeland Security Solutions
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

To keep pace with rapidly emerging technologies, DHS S&T is partnering with DEFENSEWERX (DWX), a nonprofit organization focused on cultivating ecosystems that enable the acceleration of innovative solutions to benefit the nation.

Newswise: ORNL’s Honeycutt, Horvath Named SME 2021 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineers
Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
ORNL’s Honeycutt, Horvath Named SME 2021 Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineers
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Andrew Honeycutt and Nick Horvath, machine tool researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have been selected to receive the 2021 Geoffrey Boothroyd Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award from SME, the professional manufacturing engineering association.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
B.1.1.7. variant more transmissible, does not increase severity, Lancet studies suggest
Lancet

An observational study of patients in London hospitals suggests that the B.1.1.7. variant is not associated with more severe illness and death, but appears to lead to higher viral load, consistent with emerging evidence that this lineage is more transmissible than the original COVID-19 strain.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 4:00 PM EDT
Researchers Streamline Molecular Assembly Line to Design, Test Drug Compounds
North Carolina State University

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way to fine-tune the molecular assembly line that creates antibiotics via engineered biosynthesis.

Newswise: Smoking cannabis significantly impairs vision, study finds
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:30 PM EDT
Smoking cannabis significantly impairs vision, study finds
University of Granada

Smoking cannabis significantly impairs vision but many users are unaware of it

Newswise: University of Miami Diabetes Research Institute Launches Trial of Novel Investigational Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:20 PM EDT
University of Miami Diabetes Research Institute Launches Trial of Novel Investigational Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Researchers with the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated have initiated clinical trials for VX-880, a novel investigational cell therapy with the potential to restore normal glucose control in people suffering from type 1 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia and impaired hypoglycemic awareness. The University of Miami Health System was the first clinical site activated for this trial.

Newswise: Plasma device designed for consumers can quickly disinfect surfaces
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Plasma device designed for consumers can quickly disinfect surfaces
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on the urgent need for quick and easy techniques to sanitize and disinfect everyday high-touch objects such as doorknobs, pens, pencils, and personal protective gear worn to keep infections from spreading.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 14-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 14-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Brachytherapy May Proceed Safely, Without Delay
 in Cervical Cancer Patients Following Uterine Perforation
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Brachytherapy May Proceed Safely, Without Delay in Cervical Cancer Patients Following Uterine Perforation
Loyola Medicine

A new study finds that brachytherapy, a common procedure that delivers radiation directly to cancer cells, may continue safely, potentially without delay or antibiotics, in cervical cancer patients following uterine perforation.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian JFK Johnson Stroke Rehabilitation Program with Modified Cardiac Rehabilitation Reduces Re-Hospitalizations, Study Finds
Released: 13-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Hackensack Meridian JFK Johnson Stroke Rehabilitation Program with Modified Cardiac Rehabilitation Reduces Re-Hospitalizations, Study Finds
Hackensack Meridian Health

Stroke survivors who completed a Stroke Recovery program that included modified cardiac rehabilitation significantly reduced their chances of ending up back in the hospital in the first year after their stroke, according to a just-published study by Hackensack Meridian JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Mindfulness can make you selfish
University at Buffalo

A new study by University at Buffalo researchers demonstrates the surprising downsides of mindfulness, while offering easy ways to minimize those consequences ─ both of which have practical implications for mindfulness training.

Newswise: 2013_09-Mike-Linda_lowres-768x1152.jpg
Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Linda and Mike Mussallem donate $5 million to Susan Samueli Integrative Health Institute
University of California, Irvine

A $5 million gift to the University of California, Irvine from Linda and Mike Mussallem will support integrative cardiology training and research in the Susan Samueli Integrative Health Institute and initiate a UC system-wide health coaching program.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
‘Our Changing Menu’: Warming climate serves up meal remake
Cornell University

How will climate change affect the world’s dinner plates?

Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Department of Energy to Provide $25 Million toward Development of a Quantum Internet
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a plan to provide $25 million for basic research toward the development of a quantum internet.

Newswise: 041321-blog-puredata.jpg?itok=5ypFi5di
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Introducing SC Public Reusable Research (PuRe) Data Resources
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The Department of Energy Office of Science (SC) supports the scientific community by allocating research funding, providing access to state-of-the art scientific user facilities, and stewarding community data.

Newswise:Video Embedded an-artificial-retina-engineered-from-ancient-protein-heads-to-space
VIDEO
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:15 PM EDT
An Artificial Retina Engineered From Ancient Protein Heads to Space
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

NIH supported early testing of the artificial retina. Now, scientists are testing whether manufacturing it on the International Space Station results in a viable treatment for people with blinding eye diseases.

Newswise: Northern Star Coral Study Could Help Protect Tropical Corals: Rhode Island Considers Naming the Local Coral as a State Emblem
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:15 PM EDT
Northern Star Coral Study Could Help Protect Tropical Corals: Rhode Island Considers Naming the Local Coral as a State Emblem
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

As the Rhode Island legislature considers designating the Northern Star Coral an official state emblem, researchers are finding that studying this local creature’s recovery from a laboratory-induced stressor could help better understand how to protect endangered tropical corals.

Newswise: Study cements age and location of hotly debated skull from early human Homo erectus
Released: 13-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Study cements age and location of hotly debated skull from early human Homo erectus
American Museum of Natural History

Scientists also find two new, nearly 2-million-year-old specimens--likely the earliest pieces of the H. erectus skeleton yet discovered

Newswise: Dean Accepted into The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Dean Accepted into The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Rutgers School of Public Health

Perry N. Halkitis, dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health, has been selected as a fellow into the 2021 cohort at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Newswise: Narratives Can Help Science Counter Misinformation on Vaccines
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Narratives Can Help Science Counter Misinformation on Vaccines
Iowa State University

Narratives are a powerful tool that can help explain complex issues, but they can also serve as sources of misinformation, which presents a challenge as public health agencies work to educate people about COVID-19 vaccine.

Newswise: Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Wheezing, coughing that doesn’t stop, a pale and sweaty face: clinically, severe asthma attacks look very similar from patient to patient. But biologically, not all severe asthma is the same—and a team of scientists has, for the first time, identified the key difference in people, a finding that has important implications for treatment.

Newswise: 1920_maya.jpg?10000
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Low-Back Pain Relieved by New Minimally Invasive Procedure
Cedars-Sinai

When Maria Reynoso developed low-back pain, she thought it was not serious and would quickly go away. She was an active gym member who had recently retired after 33 years as a second-grade schoolteacher and was always available to help her aging parents.

Newswise: Henry Ford Health System Cardiologist to Lead Michigan Chapter of the American College of Cardiology
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Henry Ford Health System Cardiologist to Lead Michigan Chapter of the American College of Cardiology
Henry Ford Health System

Karthikeyan Ananthasubramaniam, M.D, FACC (Karthik Ananth), Director of Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac PET Laboratory at Henry Ford Hospital, has been elected to lead the Michigan Chapter of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) through 2025.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Rutgers to Host Careers in Gerontology Twitter Chat
Rutgers School of Public Health

Rutgers to discuss careers in aging, opportunities and challenges that exist for this part of our population, and ways to lead change

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Potential mechanistic link shown between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s disease

Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Modified Nanoparticles Can Stop Osteoarthritis Development
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

After a team of researchers showed that a certain enzyme’s presence in cartilage increased significantly in people with osteoarthritis, they targeted it with specially-loaded nanoparticles that stopped the disease’s progression in its tracks.

Newswise: Four UHealth Faculty Tapped for Key Editorial Positions at the New Peer-reviewed Otology & Neurotology Open Journal
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Four UHealth Faculty Tapped for Key Editorial Positions at the New Peer-reviewed Otology & Neurotology Open Journal
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Michael E. Hoffer, M.D., FACS, professor of otolaryngology and neurological surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, is editor-in-chief of the newly launched gold open access journal Otology & Neurotology Open, the official open access scientific journal of the American Otological Society and American Neurotology Society.

Newswise: Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a series of experiments that began with amoebas — single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around — Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment.

Newswise: When Immigrant Policies are Decriminalized, Babies are Born Healthier
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:30 AM EDT
When Immigrant Policies are Decriminalized, Babies are Born Healthier
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health led-research finds that criminalizing immigrant policies were associated with higher rates of preterm birth for Black women born outside the U.S.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 15-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Apr-2021 10:30 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 15-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer and High Mutational Burden May Benefit from Pembrolizumab
University of Michigan

Study findings support the recent FDA approval of the immunotherapy agent for patients whose cancers have high number of mutations.

Newswise: Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A chemical modification of RNA that can be influenced by diet appears to play a key role in polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder that is the fourth leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online today in Cell Metabolism, suggest new ways to treat this incurable condition.

Newswise: How to Handle Nosebleeds
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
How to Handle Nosebleeds
Hackensack Meridian Health (Mountainside Medical Center)

Nosebleeds can be your body’s response to several factors. Seasonal allergies, injury or trauma to the nose, repeated sneezing, cold air, certain medications, chemical irritants and nose-picking can all lead to bleeding in the nose. Luckily, very few reasons for a nosebleed indicate any sort of serious medical problem.

Newswise: Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Sprint – A new NEST unit under construction
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

At NEST, the research and innovation platform of Empa and Eawag, the new Sprint unit is currently under construction – an office unit built largely from recycled materials. Sprint aims to set new standards for circular construction. However, the office unit is also a reaction to the current COVID-19 situation, which made it clear that we need to adapt our buildings more flexibly and quickly to changing needs.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Puerto Rico, Coronavirus Among Top Latino Twitter Topics During 2020 Election
George Washington University

Latinos discussed Puerto Rico and the COVID-19 pandemic more than any other subject on Twitter in the run-up to the 2020 election, according to researchers at the George Washington University. Spanish-language tweets mentioning “freedom” and “socialism” were also popular, while topics such as Obamacare and immigration did not gain much traction.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Call For Speakers – AAHCM Accepting Proposals for 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting Speakers Through Friday, April 16
American Academy of Home Care Medicine

The American Academy of Home Care Medicine (AAHCM) is accepting proposals for speakers for its 2021 virtual Annual Meeting to be held October 29-30.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Wolters Kluwer Webinar Series Presents Nursing Education Leaders Who Will Address the Future of Nursing Education and the Skills New Nurses Need to be Practice Ready
Wolters Kluwer Health

The Lippincott® Nursing Education Speaker Series explores the issues nurse educators are facing today including the future of nursing education, integration of adaptive learning technology, assessment changes and preparing students for practice in a post-COVID-19 environment. The series is co-sponsored by the National League for Nursing.


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