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Released: 28-Nov-2022 7:30 PM EST
COVID lockdown did not lead to a rush on opioid prescriptions
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

While some feared that New Yorkers would re-fill prescriptions to stockpile opioid medications in the early weeks of the COVID-19 lockdown much in the way people hoarded toilet paper, in fact, New York State opioid prescriptions declined in the period around the March 20, 2020 “PAUSE” order, according to new research.

Newswise: Mangroves: environmental guardians of our coastline
Released: 28-Nov-2022 7:20 PM EST
Mangroves: environmental guardians of our coastline
University of South Australia

They are the salt-tolerant shrubs that thrive in the toughest of conditions, but according to new UniSA research, mangroves are also avid coastal protectors, capable of surviving in heavy metal contaminated environments.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 7:15 PM EST
Learning from pangolins and peacocks: Researchers explore next-gen structural materials
University of Colorado Boulder

From pangolin scales that can stand up to hard hits to colorful but sturdy peacock feathers, nature can do a lot with a few simple molecules.

Not for public release

This news release is embargoed until 28-Nov-2022 7:05 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 2:15 PM EST

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Released: 28-Nov-2022 6:55 PM EST
Positive media coverage of cannabis studies regardless of therapeutic effect
Karolinska Institute

In cannabis trials against pain, people who take placebos report feeling largely the same level of pain relief as those who consume the active cannabinoid substance.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 6:40 PM EST
Non-detection of key signal allows astronomers to determine what the first galaxies were – and weren’t – like
University of Cambridge

Researchers have been able to make some key determinations about the first galaxies to exist, in one of the first astrophysical studies of the period in the early Universe when the first stars and galaxies formed, known as the cosmic dawn.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 6:20 PM EST
Shaking less salt on your food at the table could reduce heart disease risk
American College of Cardiology (ACC)

Adding additional salt to foods at a lower frequency is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, heart failure and ischemic heart disease, according to a new study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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This news release is embargoed until 30-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 5:50 PM EST

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This news release is embargoed until 30-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 5:45 PM EST

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This news release is embargoed until 30-Nov-2022 6:30 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 5:10 PM EST

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Newswise: Sam Torbati, MD, Named Cedars-Sinai’s Levin-Gordon Chair in Emergency Medicine in Honor of Joel M. Geiderman, MD
Released: 28-Nov-2022 5:00 PM EST
Sam Torbati, MD, Named Cedars-Sinai’s Levin-Gordon Chair in Emergency Medicine in Honor of Joel M. Geiderman, MD
Cedars-Sinai

Sam Torbati, MD, co-chair and medical director of the Cedars-Sinai Ruth and Harry Roman Emergency Department, has been named the Levin-Gordon Chair in Emergency Medicine in Honor of Joel M. Geiderman, MD.

21-Nov-2022 2:05 PM EST
ACP issues Rapid, Living Practice Points on treating COVID-19 patients in outpatient settings
American College of Physicians (ACP)

In a new Rapid and Living Practice Points, the American College of Physicians (ACP) summarizes the best available evidence about the use of pharmacologic and biologic treatments of COVID-19 in the outpatient setting. Outpatient Treatment of Confirmed Mild or Moderate COVID-19: Living and Rapid Practice Points from the American College of Physicians (Version 1), is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

21-Nov-2022 2:05 PM EST
Despite fewer overall COVID-19 deaths, more younger people died in second year of the pandemic
American College of Physicians (ACP)

A brief research report found that despite 20.8 percent fewer COVID-19 deaths occurring in the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic, 7.4 percent more years of life were lost due to a shift in COVID-19 mortality to relatively younger people. The report is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

21-Nov-2022 2:05 PM EST
Critical changes in COVID-19 standards of care associated with improved mortality outcomes
American College of Physicians (ACP)

An observational study of COVID-19 standard of care (SOC) measures found improvements in recovery and mortality over time in adults hospitalized with COVID-19 and investigated changes in SOC that may explain these improvements. The study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

21-Nov-2022 2:05 PM EST
In some settings, medical masks may offer similar effectiveness to N95 respirators for preventing COVID-19 infection among health care workers
American College of Physicians (ACP)

A study of more than 1,000 health care workers was unable to establish whether medical masks are significantly less effective at preventing COVID-19 infection than N95 respirators in hospital settings. The findings varied across countries, which were studied during different times in the pandemic, and uncertainty in the estimates of effect limit definitiveness of findings. The study is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Newswise: Rutgers Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies Premiers Film on LGBTQ+ Health Equity
Released: 28-Nov-2022 4:50 PM EST
Rutgers Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies Premiers Film on LGBTQ+ Health Equity
Rutgers School of Public Health

The Rutgers School of Public Health’s Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies (CHIBPS) premiered the short film “Queer Health: Advancing LGBTQ+ Health Equity.”

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This news release is embargoed until 30-Nov-2022 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 4:40 PM EST

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Newswise: Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Released: 28-Nov-2022 4:35 PM EST
Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Northern Arizona University

A recent study co-authored by associate professor Matthew Bowker found important connections between grazing pressure on drylands and the ecosystem services they provide. 

Released: 28-Nov-2022 4:25 PM EST
Cerebral palsy itself does not cause death in adults, so why is it still listed as an underlying cause?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Listing cerebral palsy as the main cause of death for adults with cerebral palsy can contribute to a lack of understanding about how the condition interacts with various secondary illnesses and complications.

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This news release is embargoed until 5-Dec-2022 12:40 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST

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This news release is embargoed until 1-Dec-2022 6:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 3:55 PM EST

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This news release is embargoed until 29-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 3:40 PM EST

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
This news release is embargoed until 5-Dec-2022 4:35 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 3:30 PM EST

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Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:25 PM EST
Study finds that big rains bring big algae blooms… eventually
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In the lake-rich regions of the world, algae blooms are a growing problem. Not only are the floating green scums a nuisance for anyone hoping to enjoy the water, they can turn toxic and threaten public health.The main driver behind these blooms is phosphorus, an element used widely in agriculture to fertilize crops, that can run from the land and into lakes — especially during heavy rains.

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This news release is embargoed until 5-Dec-2022 3:15 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 3:20 PM EST

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Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:15 PM EST
UCI-led study finds pay practices, job barriers to blame for women making less than men
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 28, 2022 — Despite advances in gender equality, women still earn less than men in all advanced, industrialized societies. Who – or what – is to blame? A new 15-country study led by Andrew Penner at the University of California, Irvine, divides fault evenly between inequitable within-job salary structures and the decisions that route men and women into differently compensated roles.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:10 PM EST
Why housing alone is not enough for some homeless moms
Ohio State University

Giving some homeless mothers with young children a place to live may do little to help them if it is not combined with support services, a first-of-its-kind study showed.

Newswise: Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:05 PM EST
Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Northern peatlands contain one third of the Earth’s soil carbon, making them important for carbon storage. In northern peatlands, carbon losses from soil during the winter can exceed carbon storage during the warm growing season, primarily because of the activity of microbes. To better understand how microbes interact in peatland soils during the winter months, this study incubated Arctic peat soils under winter conditions, then analyzed the microbes to understand how the microbes released carbon dioxide.

Newswise: ‘You can always make a change’: 15-Year-Old Johns Hopkins Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Thrives Almost 2 Years After Diagnosis
Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:05 PM EST
‘You can always make a change’: 15-Year-Old Johns Hopkins Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Thrives Almost 2 Years After Diagnosis
Johns Hopkins Medicine

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Youth onset type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, and a recent study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, documented a steep rise in new diagnoses of type 2 diabetes among children during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic

Newswise:Video Embedded the-swimming-habits-of-gelatinous-animals-are-inspiring-underwater-vehicle-design
VIDEO
22-Nov-2022 6:05 PM EST
The swimming habits of gelatinous animals are inspiring underwater vehicle design
University of Oregon

Two different swimming styles of a marine animal related to jellyfish let the animal prioritize speed or energy efficiency, depending on its current needs, a team of University of Oregon researchers found. The UO team, led by marine biologist Kelly Sutherland and postdoctoral researcher Kevin Du Clos, report their findings in a paper published Nov. 28 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: American Chemical Society announces new CEO: Albert G. Horvath
Released: 28-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST
American Chemical Society announces new CEO: Albert G. Horvath
American Chemical Society (ACS)

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Board of Directors has selected Albert G. Horvath, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer (CFO) at ACS, as the Society’s next CEO, effective Jan. 1, 2023. He succeeds Thomas Connelly Jr., who is retiring after nearly eight years with ACS.

   
Newswise: Are older women being over-screened for cervical cancer?
Released: 28-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST
Are older women being over-screened for cervical cancer?
University of Illinois Chicago

Analysis showed that in 2019 more than 1.3 million women received cervical cancer screening-associated services, such as a Pap test, colposcopy and other cervical procedures, after age 65. While these services cost more than $83 million, the researchers concluded they were of “unclear clinical appropriateness.”

Newswise: Jeffrey Schwartz, MD, Named Chair of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Loyola Medicine
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:50 PM EST
Jeffrey Schwartz, MD, Named Chair of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Loyola Medicine
Loyola Medicine

Loyola Medicine has announced the appointment of Jeffrey Schwartz, MD, as chair of the Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery at Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC) and Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago. Dr. Schwartz first joined the medical staff at LUMC in 1998. He inherits a department with a strong legacy of excellence led previously by Mamdouh Bakhos, MD, who served as department chair for more than 30 years. "Dr. Bakhos is one of the preeminent cardiothoracic surgeons of his generation, he has been a great mentor to me and has had an invaluable impact on my career and success to date," said Dr. Schwartz. "I'm humbled to inherit his legacy and carry the torch forward."

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:45 PM EST
The Green Mediterranean diet reduces twice as much visceral fat as the Mediterranean diet and 10% more than a healthy diet
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

The green Mediterranean diet (MED) significantly reduces visceral adipose tissue, a type of fat around internal organs that is much more dangerous than the extra "tire" around your waist.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:35 PM EST
What Ancient Underwater Food Webs Can Tell Us About the Future of Climate Change
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV analysis challenges the idea that ocean ecosystems have barely changed over millions of years, pointing scientists down a new path on conservation efforts and policy.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:35 PM EST
New study offers insight into the development of human triple negative breast cancers
Boston University School of Medicine

Basal-like breast cancers, also known as triple-negative cancers, are an aggressive breast cancer subtype with poor treatment options.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EST
Researchers take first step towards controlling photosynthesis using mirrors
Lund University

With the help of mirrors, placed only a few hundred nanometers apart, a research team has managed to use light more efficiently.

Newswise: Temporary “tattoos” that measure blood pressure
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:20 PM EST
Temporary “tattoos” that measure blood pressure
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

NIBIB-funded researchers are fine-tuning a wearable, cuffless blood pressure monitor. Made of graphene, one of the thinnest materials in the world, the device is worn on the underside of the wrist and can measure blood pressure with comparable accuracy to a standard blood pressure cuff.

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This news release is embargoed until 5-Dec-2022 4:20 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 1:15 PM EST

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Newswise: Enzyme Drives Cognitive Decline in Mice, Provides New Target for Alzheimer’s
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Enzyme Drives Cognitive Decline in Mice, Provides New Target for Alzheimer’s
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers identify the PKCα enzyme as a promising therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease; a mutation that increases its activity led to biochemical, cellular and cognitive impairments in mice.

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This news release is embargoed until 30-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST

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Newswise: Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM) - CSIC

A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), with colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Oceanology, the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Gdańsk have also participated has revealed that global warming and ocean acidification threaten marine organisms that build their skeletons and shells with calcium carbonate (chalk) such as corals, bryozoans, molluscs, sea urchins or crustaceans.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Chemotherapy could increase disease susceptibility in future generations
Washington State University

A common chemotherapy drug could carry a toxic inheritance for children and grandchildren of adolescent cancer survivors, Washington State University-led research indicates.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:05 PM EST
Drugs from plastic waste
Wiley

Plastic waste is one of the most significant ecological and economic problems of our time.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 12:55 PM EST
Community pharmacy-led vaccination scheme helped thousands of patients overcome hesitancy around Covid-19 jabs, research finds
Kingston University

An award-winning scheme that saw community pharmacists support patients to understand the benefits of being jabbed against Covid-19 and overcome initial hesitancy proved hugely successful, new research by an expert from Kingston University has shown.


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