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Article ID: 710032

African-Americans More Likely to Be Misdiagnosed with Schizophrenia, Rutgers Study Finds

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

African-Americans with severe depression are more likely to be misdiagnosed as having schizophrenia, according to a new Rutgers study.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 12:20 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710031

Easy Credit, Foolish Assumptions Are Key Ingredients of Financial Crises, Johns Hopkins Finance Expert Writes in New Book, ‘Broken Bargain’

Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Kathleen Day, a long time business reporter and Johns Hopkins Carey Business School faculty, explores the history of financial crises in the new book "Broken Bargain: Bankers, Bailouts, and the Struggle to Tame Wall Street."

Released:
21-Mar-2019 12:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710030

AMSSM Releases Updated Position Statement on Blood-borne Pathogens in the Context of Sports Participation

American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM)

There have been significant advances in clinical and scientific research in the understanding of blood-borne pathogens (BBPs), which are pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Updating a statement from 1995, this document is intended as a general guide to clinical practice based on the current state of evidence, while acknowledging the need for modification as new knowledge becomes available.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710028

Expert Available to Comment on Perceptions of Race and the Misuse of Medieval Icons

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Laura Wiegert, director of the Program in Medieval Studies at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, is available to discuss the misuse of medieval icons in white supremacist rhetoric, as well as common misperceptions about the racial diversity of Europe during the Middle Ages.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Arts and Humanities

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Article ID: 710026

Naltrexone Implant Helps HIV Patients with Opioid Dependence Adhere to Medications, Prevent Relapse

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new study, published this month in Lancet HIV by Penn Medicine researchers, shows that a naltrexone implant placed under the skin was more effective at helping HIV-positive patients with an opioid addiction reduce relapse and have better HIV-related outcomes compared to the oral drug.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 12:00 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
25-Mar-2019 6:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Mar-2019 11:15 AM EDT

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Article ID: 710022

Research Implicates Causative Genes in Osteoporosis, Suggesting New Targets for Future Therapy

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 11:10 AM EDT
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Article ID: 710023

Prenatal Allergies Prompt Sexual Changes in Offspring

Ohio State University

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests. Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically “male” – mounting other female rodents, for instance – and had brains and nervous systems that looked more like those seen in typical male animals.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 11:10 AM EDT
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Article ID: 710029

How ‘Sleeper Cell’ Cancer Stem Cells Are Maintained in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

University of Alabama at Birmingham

While chronic myelogenous leukemia is in remission, ‘sleeper cell,’ quiescent leukemic stem cells persist in the bone marrow. Researchers find that niche-specific expression of chemokine CXCL12 by mesenchymal stromal cells controls quiescence of these treatment-resistant leukemic stem cells.

Released:
21-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
24-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT

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If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.


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