Latest News

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
newswise-fb-share-

Showing results

110 of 214092
GWU_logo.png

Article ID: 713145

California Law Led to an Increase in Childhood Vaccination Rates

George Washington University

A first of its kind analysis published today by researchers at the George Washington University (GW) found that a 2016 California vaccine law boosted protective coverage against measles and other serious childhood diseases compared to states that acted as statistical controls. At the same time, the data also revealed a sharp increase in medical exemptions to the vaccine mandate, concentrated in a few California counties.

Released:
20-May-2019 11:20 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Law and Public Policy

GWU_logo.png

Article ID: 713157

Media Advisory: Inaugural Global Summit on Innovations in Patient-Centered Kidney Care

George Washington University

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, in partnership with the American Association of Kidney Patients is hosting the first ever Global Summit on Innovations in Patient-Centered Kidney Care.

Released:
20-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
ScreenShot2016-07-21at10.42.00AM.png

Article ID: 713158

Key Drug Target Shown Assembling in Real-Time

Case Western Reserve University

Over one-third of all FDA-approved drugs act on a specific family of proteins: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Drugs to treat high blood pressure, asthma, cancer, diabetes and myriad other conditions target GPCRs throughout the body—but a recent study shows what happens next. In results published in Cell, researchers outline the timeline of events, including precisely when and how different parts of a GPCR interacts with its G protein signaling partners. The findings provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms of drug-induced signaling in cells, including ways to identify the most critical portions of GPCRs for targeting development of novel therapeutics.

Released:
20-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
Betacellobesity.png

Article ID: 713138

Discovery in mice could help remove roadblock to more insulin production

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new discovery made mainly in mice could provide new options for getting the insulin-making "factories" of the pancreas going again when diabetes and obesity have slowed them down. It could offer new pathways to ramping up insulin supply to get metabolism back on track in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

Released:
20-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
UoA_logo_colour.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713132

New Single Vaccination Approach to Killer Diseases

University of Adelaide

Scientists from the University of Adelaide’s Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world’s most deadly respiratory diseases.

Released:
20-May-2019 4:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
UCSD-JacobsSchool-20190422-Steinmetz_Lab-08017-8MP.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713111

How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy

University of California San Diego

Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment. Researchers at the University of California San Diego and Case Western Reserve University have taken a step toward that goal. They discovered that a particular plant virus can deliver pesticide molecules deeper below the ground, targeting places normally beyond their reach. The work could help farmers manage infestations deep in the soil with less pesticide.

Released:
17-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
V.Raicu.UWM.jpeg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713024

New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

A new method of assessing the actions of medicines by matching them to their unique protein receptors has the potential to greatly accelerate drug development and diminish the number of drug trials that fail during clinical trials.

Released:
16-May-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
illustration_cover.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713015

How Earth’s mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting

University of Utah

To geologists, the mantle is so much more than that. It’s a region that lives somewhere between the cold of the crust and the bright heat of the core. It’s where the ocean floor is born and where tectonic plates die. A new paper published today in Nature Geoscience paints an even more intricate picture of the mantle as a geochemically diverse mosaic, far different than the relatively uniform lavas that eventually reach the surface.

Released:
16-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
2015EinsteinLogoRGB.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713010

Bolstering Biopsies: Testing Individual Cells to Guide Treatment

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

In research that could make biopsies more useful for many diseases, scientists have used a powerful new tool to zero in on individual cells in a patient’s diseased organ and reveal the cells’ underlying glitches in gene expression—information that may allow for more precise and effective treatment. The findings, by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, and other medical institutions, are published online today in Nature Immunology.

Released:
16-May-2019 12:35 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712990

Chinese-Americans Abused Earlier in Life Face Greater Abuse Risk as Elders, Rutgers Study Finds

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Chinese-Americans who were victims of child abuse or intimate partner violence are at a greater risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a Rutgers study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

Released:
16-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences


Showing results

110 of 214092

Chat now!