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Newswise: Tug-of-War Receptors Controlling Sour Taste Detection in Fruit Flies Sheds Light on Human Taste Biology
Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Tug-of-War Receptors Controlling Sour Taste Detection in Fruit Flies Sheds Light on Human Taste Biology
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Monell researchers found that flies use two distinct types of gustatory (taste) receptor neurons (GRNs), which are analogous to taste receptor cells in mammals, to discriminate slightly from highly sour foods. One group of GRNs are maximally activated by low acidity, while the other group responds to high acidity.

Newswise: Physicist Wins Early Career Grant To Study Nuclear Physics, Quantum Phenomena
Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Physicist Wins Early Career Grant To Study Nuclear Physics, Quantum Phenomena
Iowa State University

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected Iowa State's Srimoyee Sen for an early career award that will help her study nuclear physics and quantum phenomena. The research could lead to the discovery of new materials that could one day contribute to speedy quantum computing or other applications.

Newswise:Video Embedded virtual-event-for-june-17-11am-edt-covid-19-vaccines-and-male-fertility
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:20 PM EDT
VIDEO AVAILABLE: Vaccines and Male Fertility Event for June 17, 2021
Newswise

This upcoming JAMA-published study examined whether the COVID-19 vaccine impacts male fertility.

Newswise: ‘Help Is On The Way’ For People With Psychosis
Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:15 PM EDT
‘Help Is On The Way’ For People With Psychosis
University of Washington School of Medicine

The federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration recently issued a statement calling cognitive behavioral therapy the standard of care for psychosis. “This is being called a 'watershed moment’ for advancing care for people with schizophrenia,” said lead author of the statement, a UW Medicine psychologist.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Paciente da Mayo Clinic diz que graças à impressão 3D, “eles sabem quem eu sou: sou o vovô.”
Mayo Clinic

Em um piscar de olhos, tudo mudou para John Roby. A sensação de segurar firme o freio de mão, o entendimento do que estava para acontecer, a colisão inevitável entre a moto e o lado do passageiro de uma caminhonete.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
شهادة أحد المرضى في مايو كلينك: بفضل الطباعة ثلاثية الأبعاد، "أحفادي يعرفون من أنا- أنا جدهم"
Mayo Clinic

بالنسبة لجون روبي، كانت رحلة التعافي من إصابات وجهه ممكنة بفضل العمل الجماعي بين الجراحة التجميلية والأشعة باستخدام الطباعة ثلاثية الأبعاد. يمكن رؤية الدكتور شرف على يسار الصورة والدكتور موريس على يمينها.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
多亏了3D打印,“家人最终认出了我 —— 他们的祖父”,妙佑医疗国际(Mayo Clinic)的一位患者说道
Mayo Clinic

对于John Roby来说,当下一瞬间 —— 紧急握住手刹,轮胎强烈摩擦地面,意识到大难临头,紧接着摩托车和皮卡副驾驶位之间不可避免地碰撞 —— 全然改观他的人生。

Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Gracias a la impresión tridimensional, «saben quién soy… soy el abuelo», dice un paciente de Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic

En un instante y mientras se aferraba a los frenos de mano, escuchaba rechinar las llantas y se percataba de que su motocicleta iba a chocar inevitablemente contra el lado del pasajero de una camioneta, todo cambió para John Roby.

Newswise:Video Embedded managed-retreat-all-options-on-the-table
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
War against climate change must include managed retreat – now
University of Delaware

Climate change will shape the future of coastal communities, with flood walls, elevated structures and possibly floating cities used to combat sea level rise. New research has found that managed retreat must be part of the solution now, and not a last resort.

Newswise: Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Scientists have a general idea of how viruses invade and spread in the body, but the precise mechanisms are actually not well understood, especially when it comes to Ebola virus. Olena Shtanko, Ph.D., a Staff Scientist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed), has received more than $1 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore different aspects of Ebola virus infection.

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Embargo will expire: 24-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire: 21-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT

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Newswise: Study Adds to Evidence that Most Cancer Cells Grown in a Dish have Little in Common Genetically with Cancer Cells in People
Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Study Adds to Evidence that Most Cancer Cells Grown in a Dish have Little in Common Genetically with Cancer Cells in People
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a bid to find or refine laboratory research models for cancer that better compare with what happens in living people, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report they have developed a new computer-based technique showing that human cancer cells grown in culture dishes are the least genetically similar to their human sources.

17-Jun-2021 10:15 AM EDT
People With Back Pain Miss Far Fewer Workdays When They Receive Recommended Treatments
University of Utah Health

Medical guidelines help doctors understand the best way to treat health conditions. Surprisingly, many doctors do not adhere to them, and this is a problem, according to a new study. People with lower back pain injury miss 11 more days of work in a year when they only receive treatments for lower back pain that are not recommended by medical guidelines compared to people treated according to guidelines.

Newswise: Unraveling the Origin of Alzheimer’s Disease
16-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Unraveling the Origin of Alzheimer’s Disease
Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University researchers studying prions—misfolded proteins that cause lethal incurable diseases—have identified for the first time surface features of human prions responsible for their replication in the brain.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
How Cells “Read” Artificial Ingredients Tossed into Genetic Recipe
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered that the enzyme RNA polymerase II recognizes and transcribes artificially added base pairs in genetic code, a new insight that could help advance the development of new vaccines and medicines.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Red meat consumption may promote DNA damage-assoc. mutation in colorectal cancer patients
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

Genetic mutations indicative of DNA damage were associated with high red meat consumption and increased cancer-related mortality in patients with colorectal cancer.

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Embargo will expire: 18-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT

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Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Changing a 2D Material’s Symmetry Can Unlock Its Promise
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Nature Nanotechnology, a team of materials scientists and engineers, led by Jian Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, used a strain gradient in order to break inversion symmetry, creating a novel optoelectronic phenomenon in the promising material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) — for the first time.

Newswise: Saint Louis University Student Searches for Possible Origins of Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon
Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Saint Louis University Student Searches for Possible Origins of Life on Saturn’s Largest Moon
Saint Louis University

Chemistry grad student Steven Skaggs was recently selected for funding by the Future Investigators in NASA Earth and Space Science and Technology (FINESST) program.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Hackensack Meridian Doctors, Student Help Establish Way to Prioritize Surgeries During COVID-19 lockdown
Hackensack Meridian Health

The MeNTS method of prioritizing surgeries during the height of pandemic, developed by University of Chicago, helped procedures continue during time of need

Newswise: Study Shows Immunotherapy Drug Combination Improves Response in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Including a Subset of Estrogen Receptor Positive Cancers
Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:15 PM EDT
Study Shows Immunotherapy Drug Combination Improves Response in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Including a Subset of Estrogen Receptor Positive Cancers
Yale Cancer Center

In a new study by researchers at Yale Cancer Center, combining the immunotherapy drug durvalumab and PARP-inhibitor olaparib with chemotherapy improved response to treatment for women with high-risk, HER2-negative breast cancer, including a subset of estrogen receptor positive cancers.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Chobani Scholars Program Supports Future NYS Dairy Leaders
Cornell University

Four undergraduates from New York state who are majoring in animal science each received $20,000 scholarships this past year through the Chobani Scholars Program, to help them achieve their dairy career ambitions across four years of study.

Newswise: 267975_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Simple urine test may help early detection of brain tumors
Nagoya University

A recent study by Nagoya University researchers revealed that microRNAs in urine could be a promising biomarker to diagnose brain tumors. Their findings, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, have indicated that regular urine tests could help early detection and treatment of brain tumors, possibly leading to improved patient survival.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
‘Nanodecoy’ Therapy Binds and Neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 Virus
North Carolina State University

Nanodecoys made from human lung spheroid cells (LSCs) can bind to and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, promoting viral clearance and reducing lung injury in a macaque model of COVID-19.

Newswise: California’s Top Autism and Special Education Law Firm Director James D. Peters III Featured in Lawyer Monthly Magazine
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
California’s Top Autism and Special Education Law Firm Director James D. Peters III Featured in Lawyer Monthly Magazine
Special Education Law Division; Law Offices of Sheila C. Bayne

Q&A with Peters addresses class action suit to obtain services for children with special needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: 268218_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Alpine plant spins its own flavonoid wool
University of Cambridge

Like the movie version of Spider-Man who shoots spider webs from holes in his wrists, a little alpine plant has been found to eject cobweb-like threads from tiny holes in specialised cells on its leaves.

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Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Jun-2021 12:35 PM EDT

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Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:30 PM EDT
SLAS Announces Open Access Journal Publishing with Elsevier in 2022
SLAS

The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) is pleased to announce the transition of SLAS Discovery and SLAS Technology to a Gold Open Access publishing model as of January 1, 2022. SLAS will partner with Elsevier, which will make both journals available through its online platform, ScienceDirect, in turn, making articles instantly and easily accessible to scientific audiences worldwide.

Newswise: Beneficial Bacteria Can Be Restored to C-Section Babies at Birth
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Beneficial Bacteria Can Be Restored to C-Section Babies at Birth
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Babies born by cesarean section don’t have the same healthy bacteria as those born vaginally, but a Rutgers-led study for the first time finds that these natural bacteria can be restored.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Texas A&M AgriLife Plant Breeding Programs Granted $1.75 million
Texas A&M AgriLife

Four Texas A&M College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Department of Soil and Crop Sciences plant breeding program development projects have been funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, NIFA. These programs are aimed at enhancing sorghum, corn, peanut and wheat cultivars for farmer use.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 21-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 17-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT

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Newswise: A New Rapid Assessment To Promote Climate-Informed Conservation and Nature-Based Solutions
Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
A New Rapid Assessment To Promote Climate-Informed Conservation and Nature-Based Solutions
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new article, published as a Perspective in the journal Conservation Science and Practice, introduces a rapid assessment framework that can be used as a guide to make conservation and nature-based solutions more robust to future climate.

Newswise: Engineered NK cells can eliminate glioblastoma stem cells
16-Jun-2021 5:35 PM EDT
Engineered NK cells can eliminate glioblastoma stem cells
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Preclinical research finds that glioblastoma stem cells can be targeted by NK cells, but they are able to evade immune attack by releasing TFG-β. Deleting the TFG-β receptor in NK cells renders them resistant to this and restores their anti-tumor activity.

Newswise: Blood Cancer Patients with COVID-19 Fare Better with Convalescent Plasma
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Blood Cancer Patients with COVID-19 Fare Better with Convalescent Plasma
Washington University in St. Louis

A large, retrospective, multicenter study involving Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that convalescent plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients can dramatically improve likelihood of survival among blood cancer patients hospitalized with the virus. The therapy involves transfusing plasma — the pale yellow liquid in blood that is rich in antibodies — from people who have recovered from COVID-19 into patients who have leukemia, lymphoma or other blood cancers and are hospitalized with the viral infection.

Newswise: Thin, Stretchable Biosensors Could Make Surgery Safer
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Thin, Stretchable Biosensors Could Make Surgery Safer
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A research team from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Purdue University have developed bio-inks for biosensors that could help localize critical regions in tissues and organs during surgical operations.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Endocrine Society celebrates Supreme Court decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act
Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society today praised the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act, which makes health care accessible to millions of individuals nationwide, including those with hormone health conditions such as diabetes, osteoporosis, thyroid conditions, and breast and prostate cancer.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Develop Non-invasive Approach to Measure Biomarker Levels, Predict Outcomes in Lung Cancer Patients
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new article published in the Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers show that PET/CT images can be used to measure levels of the PD-L1 biomarker of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in a non-invasive manner and, in turn, predict a patient’s response to therapy.

Newswise: 268092_web.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:30 AM EDT
First report of dorsal navigation in a flying insect
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

People--who get lost easily in the extraordinary darkness of a tropical forest--have much to learn from a bee that can find its way home in conditions 10 times dimmer than starlight.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Stress during pandemic linked to poor sleep
Washington State University

Many people likely lost sleep over COVID-19. A study of twins led by Washington State University researchers found that stress, anxiety and depression during the first few weeks of the pandemic were associated with less and lower quality sleep.

Newswise:Video Embedded university-of-miami-miller-school-study-shows-covid-19-mrna-vaccines-do-not-impact-male-fertility
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
University of Miami Miller School Study Shows COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Do Not Impact Male Fertility
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines is safe for male reproduction, according to a new study by University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers published in JAMA , the most widely circulated general medical journal in the world.

Newswise: Mystery of Galaxy's Missing Dark Matter Deepens
Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Mystery of Galaxy's Missing Dark Matter Deepens
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble astronomers say they confirmed that an oddball galaxy mysteriously lacks dark matter—the glue that holds stars and gas together in galaxies. This confirmation challenges the standard ideas of how researchers think galaxies work.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Celebrates 90 Years of Advancing the Science of Nurse Anesthesiology
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is celebrating its 90th anniversary today.

15-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Higher COVID-19 Mortality Among Black Patients Linked to Unequal Hospital Quality
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

If Black patients were admitted to the same hospitals that serve a majority of White patients, researchers showed their risk of death would drop by 10 percent


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