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Article ID: 709959

Supercomputer Simulations Help Combat Tuberculosis (TB) Granulomas

University of California San Diego

Researchers from the University of Michigan relied on supercomputers to help them develop detailed models to better understand how TB spreads throughout the lungs.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709953

Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer

Wiley

Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. A new International Journal of Cancer study achieved this by following 50,045 individuals aged 40 to 75 years for a median of 10 years.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709960

Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

University of Huddersfield

The work, published in Nature, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration

Released:
20-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
21-Mar-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT

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Article ID: 709954

Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer

N/A

Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. A new International Journal of Cancer study achieved this by following 50,045 individuals aged 40 to 75 years for a median of 10 years.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709951

What oil leaves behind in 2.5 billion gallons of water every day in US

Purdue University

About 2.5 billion gallons of produced water, a byproduct from the oil refinery and extraction process, is generated each day in the United States.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709947

Assessment Tool Predicts Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Six Months after Mono

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

To assess risk factors for chronic fatigue syndrome after mononucleosis, researchers developed and validated a scale for rating the severity of mononucleosis. In a study with 126 college students, they found that participants with a higher mononucleosis severity score had over three times the risk of meeting two or more sets of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome after six months, as well as almost twice the chance of being prescribed steroids and an increased risk of being hospitalized during the acute illness. Their findings were published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Released:
20-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 709950

Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows

University of Cambridge

The first large-scale study of autism in China has revealed that around one in a hundred people in the country has an autism spectrum condition - the same figure as found in the West.

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20-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Mar-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709741

Balance of Two Enzymes Linked to Pancreatic Cancer Survival

University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine research sets the stage for clinicians to potentially one day use levels of a pancreatic cancer patient’s PHLPP1 and PKC enzymes as a prognostic, and for researchers to develop new therapeutic drugs that inhibit PHLPP1 and boost PKC as a means to treat the disease.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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