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Embargo will expire:
19-Feb-2020 5:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Feb-2020 9:55 AM EST

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Embargo will expire:
20-Feb-2020 12:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Feb-2020 9:20 AM EST

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Research Results
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B cells may travel to remote areas of the brain to improve stroke recovery

University of Kentucky

New University of Kentucky research shows that the immune system may target other remote areas of the brain to improve recovery after a stroke.

Channels: All Journal News, Neuro, PNAS,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Michigan Medicine Pediatric Surgeon Performs Incision-Less Hernia Repairs for Kids

Michigan Medicine Pediatric Surgeon Performs Incision-Less Hernia Repairs for Kids

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A unique procedure, created by a Michigan Medicine pediatric surgeon, is repairing inguinal hernias in children using an ultrasound and a needle, with no incision needed.

Channels: Bone Health, Children's Health, Surgery,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Alexander_web.jpg

FSU expert available to comment on effectiveness of flu vaccine

Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: February 14, 2020 | 3:35 pm | SHARE: As an outbreak of a new coronavirus makes headlines across the world, another more common infectious disease is spreading across the United States and beyond — the flu.About 8 percent of the U.S. population gets sick from the flu each season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Channels: Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Vaccines, Coronavirus, Influenza,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Electric superbike designed by students to race this summer

Electric superbike designed by students to race this summer

University of Warwick

As the government has announced proposals to ban the sale of petrol, diesel and hybrid cars by 2035 the race to electrify the motor industry is on, and motorbikes aren’t to be overlooked.

Channels: Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, Technology,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 8:45 AM EST
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Education

Newswise: Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

Florida Atlantic University

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Healthcare, Heart Disease, Pharmaceuticals, Government/Law, U.S. Politics,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
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Newswise: Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most common childhood brain cancer, accounting for up to one-third of all cases. Low grade pediatric gliomas arise in brain cells (glia) that support and nourish neurons, and current standard chemotherapies with decades-old drugs, while generally effective in lengthening life, often carry side effects or are not tolerated. Approximately 50% of children treated with traditional therapy have their tumors regrow, underscoring the need for better, targeted treatments.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Children's Health, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Clinical Trials,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Feb-2020 5:00 AM EST
Released:
13-Feb-2020 1:40 PM EST
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