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Article ID: 706600

World Trade Center Responders at Increased Risk for Head and Neck Cancers, Rutgers Study Finds

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers study has found a significant increase in head and neck cancers among workers and volunteers who responded to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), pointing to newly emerging risks that require ongoing monitoring and treatment of those who were exposed during the initial response.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 1:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 6:30 PM EST

Article ID: 706409

Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

1 in 10 children and about 1 in 6 adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn’t need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 6:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706359

Protecting oligodendrocytes may reduce the impact of multiple sclerosis

University of Chicago Medical Center

Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder in which autoreactive T cells migrate into the central nervous tissue and damage oligodendrocytes and myelin, which protect nerve cells. Sephin1 prolongs a cytoprotective response in oligodendrocytes, protecting those cells and myelin from this inflammatory attack. It dampens central nervous system inflammation, limits myelin damage and reduces the reactivation of T cells.

Released:
11-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
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Embargo will expire:
23-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2019 4:50 PM EST

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Article ID: 706626

Loyola Medicine Awarded $10,000 Grant from Huggies®

Loyola University Health System

Loyola Medicine was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from Huggies® as part of the company's No Baby Unhugged initiative.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST
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Embargo will expire:
18-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706406

Survey Questions Cancer Doctors’ Awareness of LGBTQ Issues

NYU Langone Health

Most oncologists say they don’t know enough about how to treat patients with differences in sexual orientation or identity, but most are also interested in learning more, a new study finds.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 10:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706396

Moffitt Cancer Center Leads the Nation in Addressing LGBTQ Health Care Disparities and Education

Moffitt Cancer Center

Moffitt launched the first nationwide survey to identify potential gaps in attitudes, knowledge and institutional practices for LGBTQ patients.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 9:15 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706386

Moving More in Old Age May Protect Brain from Dementia

Rush University Medical Center

Older adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
11-Jan-2019 4:45 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706384

Moving More in Old Age May Be Linked to Sharper Memory

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Older adults who move more, either with daily exercise or even simple routine physical activity like housework, may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 4:00 PM EST
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