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Embargo will expire:
18-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Feb-2020 2:05 PM EST

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Newswise: Data scientists ID potential vulnerabilities in the COVID-19 virus

Data scientists ID potential vulnerabilities in the COVID-19 virus

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Data scientists analyzing genetic sequences of the COVID-19 coronavirus have identified potential vulnerabilities that could help in vaccine development and further study of the infectious disease now spreading worldwide.

Channels: All Journal News, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Vaccines, Coronavirus,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 2:05 PM EST
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Breaking the Communication Code

University of Delaware

Ever wonder how mice talk to each other? We don’t have a dictionary quite yet, but UD neuroscientist Josh Neunuebel and his lab have linked the ultrasonic vocalizations made by mice with specific behaviors. It’s a significant advance of our understanding of communication science.

Channels: All Journal News, Autism, Neuro, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
17-Feb-2020 1:55 PM EST
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WWI helmets protect against shock waves just as well as modern designs

Duke University

Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated that, despite significant advancements in protection from ballistics and blunt impacts, modern military helmets are no better at protecting the brain from shock waves created by nearby blasts than their World War I counterparts.

Channels: All Journal News, Engineering, Materials Science, Technology,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 1:05 PM EST
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Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections

University of Hawaii at Manoa

A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar "wind," a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun.

Channels: All Journal News, Physics, Space and Astronomy,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
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A smart jumpsuit provides information on infants' movement and development

University of Helsinki

A new innovation makes it possible, for the first time, to quantitatively assess children's spontaneous movement in the natural environment.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Engineering, Neuro, Technology,

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17-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
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After free lunch from drug firms, doctors increase prescriptions

Cornell University

Doctors prescribe more branded medications after marketing visits by the makers of those drugs, new research co-authored by a Cornell University economist confirms.

Channels: All Journal News, Business Ethics, Economics, Healthcare, Marketing, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 12:50 PM EST
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Study identifies states with highest rates of melanoma due to ultraviolet radiation

American Cancer Society (ACS)

A new study finds a wide state-by-state variation in rates of melanoma caused by ultraviolet (UV) exposure with highest rates in several states on the East and West Coast including Hawaii, but also a few landlocked states, including Utah, Vermont, and Minnesota.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Environmental Health, Public Health,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 12:45 PM EST
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Newswise: Reducing the epilepsy treatment gap in Pakistan: Start small, stay flexible, never give up

Reducing the epilepsy treatment gap in Pakistan: Start small, stay flexible, never give up

International League Against Epilepsy

In retrospect, Pakistan's effort to reduce the treatment gap can appear painstakingly planned, like the blueprints for a shopping complex or a neighborhood. But the secret of the country's success is not rooted in elaborate planning. Nor did it rely on generous funding or government support.

Channels: Epilepsy, Healthcare, Middle East News, Local - Texas,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 11:55 AM EST
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