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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714612

“DNA Microscopy” Offers Entirely New Way to Image Cells

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Rather than relying on optics, the microscopy system offers a chemically encoded way to map biomolecules’ relative positions.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714566

Treatment for common cause of diarrhea more promising

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have figured out how to grow the intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium in the lab, an achievement that will speed efforts to treat or prevent diarrhea caused by the parasite.

Released:
18-Jun-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: Scientists Make Single-cell Map to Reprogram Scar Tissue into Healthy Heart Cells
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714515

Scientists Make Single-cell Map to Reprogram Scar Tissue into Healthy Heart Cells

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

To heal hearts after heart attack, UNC School of Medicine researchers developed a stable, reproducible, minimalistic platform to reprogram human fibroblast cells in scar tissue into functional cardiomyocytes, the cells of healthy heart tissue.

Released:
18-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714681

Chemotherapy Heart

Houston Methodist

Cancer patients obviously need chemotherapy treatment, but many don't realize some forms can cause heart failure. The premise here is that people need to be alerted while undergoing chemotherapy treatment because if caught early the heart disease can be reversed.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 10:50 AM EDT
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Cancer, Heart Disease

Languages:

English

Newswise: meltwater-apps-

Article ID: 714676

During Western Europe’s Last Glacial Maximum, a new model suggests high human population growth rates may have led to continuous out-migration and genetic homogeneity

PLOS

A new model explores the impact of environmental constraints and habitat suitability on the size, distribution and structure of Paleolithic human populations living in Western Europe during the Last Glacial Maximum (19–23 thousand years BP).

Released:
20-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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All Journal News, Genetics

Languages:

English

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Article ID: 714674

CRF And VEITHsymposium Announce an Alliance Between Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) and VEITHsymposium

Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF)

VEITHsymposium and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) are pleased to announce an alliance between Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) and the VEITHsymposium. TCT is the annual scientific symposium of CRF and the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. VEITHsymposium is the leading global conference covering all aspects of vascular medicine, vascular surgery and endovascular intervention.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714672

Psoriasis Patients Turn to Alternative Medicine When Traditional Treatments Fail

George Washington University

A recent survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found patients with psoriasis frequently use complementary or alternative therapies to treat their symptoms when traditional treatments fail.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

Article ID: 714642

Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

Ohio State University

A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don’t lose any weight, a new study suggests.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 714670

Plants' Oil-Production Accelerator Also Activates the Brakes

Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—Scientists studying plant biochemistry at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory recently made a surprising discovery: They found that a protein that turns on oil synthesis also activates a protein that puts the brakes on the same process. In a paper just published in the journal Plant Physiology, they describe how this seemingly paradoxical system keeps oil precursors perfectly balanced to meet plants’ needs.

Released:
20-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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