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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Jul-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 697595

Curing Breast Cancer but at What Cost? Patients Report Heavy Financial Toll

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study led by researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center finds many breast cancer patients are concerned about the financial impact of their diagnosis and treatment, and that they feel their doctor’s offices are not helping with these concerns.

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18-Jul-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697728

The Scream: What Were Those Colorful, Wavy Clouds in Edvard Munch’s Famous Painting?

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

What inspired the iconic red-and-yellow sky in The Scream, the painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch that sold for a record $119.9 million in 2012? Some say it was a volcanic sunset after the 1883 Krakatau eruption. Others think the wavy sky shows a scream from nature. But scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, University of Oxford and University of London suggest that nacreous, or “mother of pearl,” clouds which can be seen in the southern Norway inspired the dramatic scene in the painting. Their study is published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. “What’s screaming is the sky and the person in the painting is putting his or her hands over their ears so they can’t hear the scream,” said Alan Robock, study co-author and distinguished professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers–New Brunswick. “If you read what Munch wrote, the sky was screaming blood and fire.” There are four known versions of The Scream: an 1893 tempera o

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23-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697746

Mum’s Sleep Matters: The Effect of Sleep on an Unborn Baby

University of South Australia

How much sleep mothers get when they are pregnant can impact on the health of their growing baby, according to a new scoping study conducted by the University of South Australia.

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23-Jul-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 697747

Doing School Differently

University of South Australia

Alternative schooling programs could deliver greater learning outcomes for young people who are struggling at school, according to University of South Australia researcher, Dr Thomas Stehlik.

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22-Jul-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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Education

Embargo will expire:
25-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jul-2018 7:30 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire:
25-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jul-2018 7:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jul-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 697745

Study: Today’s College Graduates Facing Greater Competition for Good Jobs

American Sociological Association (ASA)

College graduates are more likely to take less-skilled jobs in recent years than ever before, and a new study from the University of North Carolina says the expansion of higher education has made each bachelor’s degree seem less exceptional to employers.

Released:
22-Jul-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 697541

Why Athletes Should Include Massage in Their Fitness Regimen

LifeBridge Health

The overexertion of muscles through rigorous physical training and exercise can affect athletes’ performance and increase their risk for injury. In between those strenuous workouts, the body could use some pampering.

Released:
22-Jul-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697398

X-ray Diffraction Method Used to Examine Collagen in the Brain, Heart, and T. rex Fossils

American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

A laboratory at the Illinois Institute of Technology is using fiber diffraction to examine tissue structures in the human brain and heart, as well as in T. rex fossils. Few researchers use this type of X-ray diffraction because of the time and labor required to complete experiments, the researchers have resolved images of the fine threads of collagen fibrils in connective, neurological and dinosaur tissues to one-billionth of a meter. During the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association, they will explain their work.

Released:
13-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697373

New MOF Vaccines Could Expand Access to Immunization and Reduce Global Health Care Costs

American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

Many vaccines become ineffective when exposed to room temperature or heat. This challenge can prevent patients from accessing lifesaving immunizations and increase the risk of global pandemics. During the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association, Jeremiah Gassensmith, University of Texas at Dallas, will describe his lab’s work developing metal-organic framework vaccines. This new biocompatible polymer framework “freezes” proteins inside vaccines. The proteins then dissolve when injected in human skin. This innovation could help health care providers transport and administer vaccines in remote areas with unreliable power.

Released:
12-Jul-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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