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5-Aug-2021 8:30 AM EDT
An action agenda for Africa’s electricity sector
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new scientific article outlines how to undertake the much needed expansion and modernization of Africa’s electricity sector.

5-Aug-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Factor in Preventing Phenylketonuria, Offering New Treatment Strategy
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

MD Anderson researchers have discovered a critical new factor in regulating metabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine and, therefore, in preventing the inherited metabolic disorder phenylketonuria. The research suggests a possible avenue for new treatments.

Newswise:Video Embedded corn-s-genetic-diversity-on-display-in-new-genome-study
VIDEO
4-Aug-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Corn’s Genetic Diversity on Display in New Genome Study
Iowa State University

A new study details the genomes of 26 lines of corn from across the globe. The genomes can help scientists piece together the puzzle of corn genetics. Using these new genomes as references, plant scientists can better select for genes likely to lead to better crop yields or stress tolerance.

Newswise: Organ Transplant Recipients Significantly Protected by COVID-19 Vaccination
Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Organ Transplant Recipients Significantly Protected by COVID-19 Vaccination
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers report that solid organ transplant recipients who were vaccinated experienced an almost 80 percent reduction in the incidence of symptomatic COVID-19 compared to unvaccinated counterparts during the same time.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:45 PM EDT
When Provided Personalized Health Resources, Patients Often Share with Others
University of Chicago Medical Center

A survey of participants in a clinical trial for CommunityRx, a community resource referral intervention, found that nearly half of users reported sharing their personalized health resources with at least one other person.

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Embargo will expire: 9-Aug-2021 4:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2021 1:40 PM EDT

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Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Family Values Outweigh Politics in U.S. Latinos’ Climate Beliefs
Cornell University

For many in the U.S., human-caused climate change is a political tug-of-war between the left and the right. But for Latinos in this country, the issue hits much closer to home.

Newswise: Statement: Employers Need to Require COVID-19 Vaccination for Healthcare Workforce
Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Statement: Employers Need to Require COVID-19 Vaccination for Healthcare Workforce
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses calls for all healthcare and long-term-care employers to require every member of the healthcare team to be vaccinated against COVID-19, except when medically contraindicated.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:30 PM EDT
ASCRS Publishes New Guidelines for Colonic Volvulus and Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction
Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

Colonic volvulus, or twisting of the large intestine, is a potentially life-threatening cause of large-bowel obstruction. An updated set of evidence-based recommendations for management of colonic volvulus – as well as for a rare condition called acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), which can mimic the symptoms of large bowel obstruction – will appear in the September 2021 issue Diseases of the Colon & Rectum (DC&R), the official journal of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

29-Jul-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Understanding Alzheimer's Progression with Improvements to Imaging, Image Processing, Machine Learning
American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

Because there is no ethical way to extract brain tissue from patients to look for clues about how amyloid plaques and protein aggregates proliferate, supplementary techniques are needed to better understand the progression of Alzheimer's disease. During ACA's 71st annual meeting, Abdullah Al Bashit, from Northeastern University, will discuss using computational techniques to help address these challenges. His work demonstrates how using small and wide-angle scattering along with state-of-the-art detection techniques will help probe the molecular structure and proliferation.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:15 PM EDT
The First Real Snapshot of Algal Bloom Toxins in Lake Erie
Ohio State University

Remote-sensing technology produces detailed images of the size and density of the harmful algal bloom (HAB) in Lake Erie’s western basin each year, but determining the bloom’s toxicity relies on research that – literally – tests the waters.

Newswise: Public
Released: 5-Aug-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Heads Reveal How ‘Overwhelming’ Government Guidance Held Schools Back as COVID Hit
University of Cambridge

Headteachers and school leaders have described how an ‘avalanche’ of confused and shifting Government guidance severely impeded schools during the critical first months of COVID lockdown in a new study.

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Embargo will expire: 10-Aug-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2021 1:00 PM EDT

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Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Counseling Profession Urged to Adopt Unified Standards of Care for Teletherapy
Palo Alto University

The COVID-19 crisis spurred a rapid migration of mental health providers from in-person to online services. However, mental health providers conducting teletherapy are not currently required to be trained in telehealth and are operating without consistent uniform standards of practice. A proposed comprehensive list of practice standards co-authored by Donna Sheperis, PhD, and Arielle Smith and published in the Journal of Technology in Counselor Education and Supervision call for the counseling profession to adopt a proposed Standards of Practice for Telehealth.

Newswise: Now How Did That Get Up There?
Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Now How Did That Get Up There?
University of Washington

New research is shedding light on how the nasal passage in dolphins and whales shifts during embryonic development, from emerging at the tip of the snout to emerging at the top of the head as a blowhole. The findings are an integrative model for this developmental transition for cetaceans.

Newswise: Dryer, Warmer Night Air Is Making Some Western Wildfires More Active at Night
Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Dryer, Warmer Night Air Is Making Some Western Wildfires More Active at Night
University of Washington

Firefighters report that Western wildfires are starting earlier in the morning and dying down later at night, hampering their ability to recover and regroup before the next day’s flareup. A study shows why: The drying power of nighttime air over much of the Western U.S. has increased dramatically in the past 40 years.

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Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Scientists Printed a Comfortable 3D House for Cells Co-Living
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

Scientists of the MIPT Cell Signaling Regulation Laboratory have developed a new low cost reproducible system for the co-cultivation of cells.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Department of Energy Announces $15.1 Million for Integrated Computational and Data Infrastructure for Science Research
Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $15.1 million for three collaborative research projects, at five universities, to advance the development of a flexible multi-tiered data and computational infrastructure to support a diverse collection of on-demand scientific data processing tasks and computationally intensive simulations.

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Released: 5-Aug-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Scientists Ensure High Resolution Measurements for Carbon Diplomacy
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

MIPT researchers have developed a multichannel laser heterodyne spectroradiometer for greenhouse gases remote sensing.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-final-25-how-to-tackle-hard-to-reach-emissions
VIDEO
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:50 AM EDT
The Final 25%: How to Tackle Hard-to-Reach Emissions
University of Oxford

Electricity, transport, and heating account for a massive 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and are at the forefront of the battle to achieve Net Zero.

Newswise: Helping India’s Smallholder Farmers
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Helping India’s Smallholder Farmers
University of Delaware

Instead of simply employing the practice of multiple cropping — producing crops multiple times during the year and not just in one growing season — a new study led by the University of Delaware’s Pinki Mondal shows that smallholder farmers in India should instead look toward different nutrition strategies. These strategies can be on the individual level, such as growing more diverse crops for personal consumption in their home gardens, or on a community-level, where individuals would work with their local communities and arrange to have farmers bring in different vegetables each week to the local markets.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Researchers Track How Microbiome Bacteria Adapt to Humans via Transmission
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Beneficial bacteria in the gut microbiome use different means to transmit from one person to another which impacts their abundance in the gut and the functions they provide, new research has found.

Newswise: Verizon and Zurich Instruments Join Q-NEXT National Quantum Science Center
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Verizon and Zurich Instruments Join Q-NEXT National Quantum Science Center
Argonne National Laboratory

Q-NEXT adds two new corporate partners to its collaboration: Verizon and Zurich Instruments. Q-NEXT, a DOE National Quantum Information Science Research Center led by Argonne, aims to develop the technology to control and transmit quantum information.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:30 AM EDT
New Study Examines Privacy and Security Perceptions of Online Education Proctoring Services
George Washington University

Educational institutions have had to transition to remote learning and exam taking. This has led to an increase in the use of online proctoring services to curb student cheating. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers explored the security and privacy perceptions of students taking proctored exams.

Newswise: Scientists Detect Characteristics of the Birth of a Major Challenge to Harvesting Fusion Energy on Earth
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Scientists Detect Characteristics of the Birth of a Major Challenge to Harvesting Fusion Energy on Earth
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Novel camera detects the birth of high-energy runaway electrons, which may lead to determining how to prevent damage caused by the highly energetic particles.

Newswise: Debunking Canning Myths
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Debunking Canning Myths
West Virginia University

With a host of online videos available on Tik Tok and YouTube, it’s tricky weeding out fact from fiction when it comes to food safety. Gina Taylor, a WVU Extension Service Family and Community Development Agent, debunks a few of these widely circulated myths and provides expert advice on safely preserving your food.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Key Improvements to Efficiency and Safety Will Enable Expansion of Nuclear Energy
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Nuclear power plants produce about 20% of the United States’ electricity. In order to increase the amount of carbon dioxide-free energy these plants can yield, improvements in efficiency and safety must be made. With support from $1.5 million in grants from the Department of Energy (DOE), researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will lead projects aimed at upgrading nuclear power plants with those goals in mind. The grants are part of more than $61 million in awards recently announced by the DOE to support nuclear energy research.

Newswise: Public
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Cytotoxic Drugs Can Increase Cancer Cell Resistance
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Cancer cells sometimes develop resistance to the cytotoxic drugs used in chemotherapy.

Newswise: Artificial Intelligence Algorithm Developed to Assess Metastatic Potential in Skin Cancers
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Artificial Intelligence Algorithm Developed to Assess Metastatic Potential in Skin Cancers
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using artificial intelligence (AI), researchers from UT Southwestern have developed a way to accurately predict which skin cancers are highly metastatic. The findings, published as the July cover article of Cell Systems, show the potential for AI-based tools to revolutionize pathology for cancer and a variety of other diseases.

Newswise: Quantum Computing Enables Unprecedented Materials Science Simulations
Released: 5-Aug-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Quantum Computing Enables Unprecedented Materials Science Simulations
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Researchers have for the first time used a quantum computer to generate accurate results from materials science simulations that can be verified with practical techniques. Eventually, such simulations on quantum computers could be more accurate and complex than simulations on classical digital computers.

4-Aug-2021 8:50 AM EDT
Achieving Equitable Access to Energy in a Changing Climate
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

IIASA researchers used a novel bottom-up approach to analyze how access to energy services may evolve over time under different scenarios of socioeconomic growth and policy scenarios that meet climate mitigation goals.

Newswise: Scientists ID Enzyme for Making Key Industrial Chemical in Plants
2-Aug-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists ID Enzyme for Making Key Industrial Chemical in Plants
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists studying the biochemistry of plant cell walls have identified an enzyme that could turn woody poplar trees into a source for producing a major industrial chemical. The research, just published in Nature Plants, could lead to a new sustainable pathway for making “p-hydroxybenzoic acid,” a chemical building block currently derived from fossil fuels, in plant biomass.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:55 AM EDT
AMSSM Partners with White House and 11 Organizations to Encourage Vaccine Conversations During Sports Physicals
American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM)

AMSSM and 11 other leading sports and medical organizations signed on to a consensus statement to encourage healthcare providers to include conversations about COVID-19 vaccinations as part of the pre-participation physical.

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Embargo will expire: 10-Aug-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2021 10:55 AM EDT

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Newswise: Superflares May Be Less Harmful to Exoplanets Than Previously Thought, Study Shows
Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Superflares May Be Less Harmful to Exoplanets Than Previously Thought, Study Shows
University of Washington

Astronomers have long suspected that superflares, extreme radiation bursts from stars, can cause lasting damage to the atmospheres — and thus habitability — of exoplanets. A new study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society reports that they pose only a limited danger to planetary systems.

Newswise:Video Embedded farewell-to-longest-serving-clinical-nurse
VIDEO
Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Farewell To Longest Serving Clinical Nurse
Cedars-Sinai

Surgical Nurse Retires After 50 Years of Dedication to the Operating Room

Newswise: Retinoblastoma Resource: Researchers Create More Accurate Research Model
Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Retinoblastoma Resource: Researchers Create More Accurate Research Model
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have created a model of the rare pediatric eye cancer that more closely mimics the biology of patient tumors.

Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Appoints Marsha Wills-Karp as New Bloomberg Centennial Professor
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed Marsha Wills-Karp, PhD, MS, as a Bloomberg Centennial Professor.

Newswise: UNC TEACCH Researchers Awarded $9 Million for Study of Suicide Prevention Tailored for Youth on the Autism Spectrum
Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:20 AM EDT
UNC TEACCH Researchers Awarded $9 Million for Study of Suicide Prevention Tailored for Youth on the Autism Spectrum
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Brenna Maddox, PhD, assistant professor in the UNC Department of Psychiatry and an implementation scientist for the UNC TEACCH Autism Program, is co-leading a national study funded by a $9-million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) that will compare the effectiveness of two suicide prevention interventions for autistic individuals.

Newswise: Public
Released: 5-Aug-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Surprising Insights Into the Migration Pattern of World’s Farthest-Migrating Species
University of British Columbia

The Arctic tern—which has the world record for the longest annual migration—uses just a few select routes, a key finding that could help efforts to conserve the species, according to a new University of British Columbia study.

Newswise: Sticky Toes Unlock Life in the Trees
30-Jul-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Sticky Toes Unlock Life in the Trees
Washington University in St. Louis

Biologists analyzed data from 2,600 lizard species worldwide and discovered that, while hundreds of different types of lizards have independently evolved arboreal lifestyles, species that possessed sticky toepads prevailed.

Newswise: Toxin Sponges May Protect Poisonous Frogs and Birds From Their Own Poisons, Study Suggests
29-Jul-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Toxin Sponges May Protect Poisonous Frogs and Birds From Their Own Poisons, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Stanford University, and the California Academy of Sciences (CAS) has uncovered new clues as to how poisonous frogs and birds avoid intoxicating themselves.

Newswise: UNC Researchers Awarded $10 Million from PCORI to Study Methods of Reducing Racial Inequities in Maternal Care
Released: 5-Aug-2021 9:55 AM EDT
UNC Researchers Awarded $10 Million from PCORI to Study Methods of Reducing Racial Inequities in Maternal Care
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A $10-million award from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) will allow researchers from the UNC School of Medicine, Mountain Area Health Education Center (MAHEC), and community partners to address a growing problem in the world of maternal healthcare.

Newswise: 2021 AIP Helleman Fellows to Study Intercellular Communication, History of String Theory, Dark Matter
Released: 5-Aug-2021 9:30 AM EDT
2021 AIP Helleman Fellows to Study Intercellular Communication, History of String Theory, Dark Matter
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

AIP's Center for History of Physics selects Robert van Leeuwen, Pepijn Moerman, and Jaco de Swart as the recipients of the 2021 AIP Robert H.G. Helleman Memorial Fellowships. The fellowships are made possible by a gift from Robert H.G. Helleman to establish an endowment for supporting young physicists with Dutch citizenship in their pursuit of research activities in physics in the United States.

Newswise: August Issue of Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Includes Diet-Associated NAFLD Risk and Increased Risk of Mortality from COVID-19 Among PPI Users
Released: 5-Aug-2021 9:25 AM EDT
August Issue of Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Includes Diet-Associated NAFLD Risk and Increased Risk of Mortality from COVID-19 Among PPI Users
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)

The August issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology includes clinical discussions of diet-associated NAFLD risk and increased risk of mortality from COVID-19 among PPI users. In addition, this issue features clinical research and reviews on IBS, gender barriers for CRC screening, hepatitis C, eosinophilic esophagitis, and more.

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Embargo will expire: 9-Aug-2021 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2021 9:00 AM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-Aug-2021 9:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 5-Aug-2021 8:55 AM EDT

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Newswise: All of Us Research Program Marks Third Anniversary with Remarkable Progress in Recruitment
Released: 5-Aug-2021 8:55 AM EDT
All of Us Research Program Marks Third Anniversary with Remarkable Progress in Recruitment
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Three years after the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched its 10-year All of Us Research Program, a regional team led by University of Miami Miller School of Medicine faculty has achieved remarkable success in recruiting members of minority communities including Black and Latino participants.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-data-show-vaping-during-pregnancy-is-harmful-to-offspring-through-adulthood
VIDEO
Released: 5-Aug-2021 8:55 AM EDT
New Data Show Vaping During Pregnancy Is Harmful to Offspring through Adulthood
American Physiological Society (APS)

The use of e-cigarettes (vaping) during pregnancy poses a significant health risk for the offspring, impairing blood vessel function even into adulthood, according to a new study by researchers at West Virginia University’s (WVU) School of Medicine.


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