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Embargo will expire:
18-Jul-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-Jul-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jul-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715843

Can gut infection trigger Parkinson’s disease?

Universite de Montreal

Results suggest some forms of PD are an autoimmune disease triggered years before noticeable symptoms

Released:
15-Jul-2019 5:35 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jul-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 715790

Improving the odds of synthetic chemistry success

University of Utah

In a new publication in Nature, University of Utah chemists Jolene Reid and Matthew Sigman show how analyzing previously published chemical reaction data can predict how hypothetical reactions may proceed, narrowing the range of conditions chemists need to explore. Their algorithmic prediction process, which includes aspects of machine learning, can save valuable time and resources in chemical research.

Released:
14-Jul-2019 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 715944

Intermittent Fasting May Improve Blood Sugar Even without Weight Loss

American Physiological Society (APS)

New research suggests that intermittent fasting—cycling through periods of normal eating and fasting—may regulate blood sugar (glucose) levels even when accompanied by little-to-no weight loss. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:30 PM EDT
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Newswise: Nationwide Study on Teen ‘Sexting’ Has Good News, Bad News

Article ID: 715946

Nationwide Study on Teen ‘Sexting’ Has Good News, Bad News

Florida Atlantic University

The good news is that adolescent sexting is not at epidemic levels as reported in some media headlines. The bad news is that it also has not decreased despite preventive efforts by educators and others, according to a much-needed update to what is currently known about the nature and extent of sexting among youth today.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:30 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: UIC becomes first public university in Illinois to offer public policy graduate program

Article ID: 715943

UIC becomes first public university in Illinois to offer public policy graduate program

University of Illinois at Chicago

The new Master of Public Policy degree, which will be offered by the UIC's College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, recently was approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education and will begin admitting students for the spring 2020 semester.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Education

Newswise: Neighborhood Environment and Health

Article ID: 715945

Neighborhood Environment and Health

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

It is well understood that urban black males are at a disproportionately high risk of poor health outcomes. But little is known about how the neighborhood environments where these men live contribute to their health.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 715948

Pincus Family Foundation partners with Tulane University to launch violence prevention scholarship program

Tulane University

The Pincus Family Foundation has awarded a $550,000 grant to Tulane University to create a new, interdisciplinary program that will train future leaders in community-focused violence prevention in New Orleans.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:00 PM EDT
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Education

Newswise: Red Algae Steal Genes from Bacteria to Cope with Environmental Stresses

Article ID: 715941

Red Algae Steal Genes from Bacteria to Cope with Environmental Stresses

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

It’s a case of grand larceny that could lead to new fuels and cleanup chemicals. Ten species of red algae stole about 1 percent of their genes from bacteria to cope with toxic metals and salt stress in hot springs, according to a study in the journal eLife. These red algal species, known as Cyanidiales, also stole many genes that allow them to absorb and process different sources of carbon in the environment to provide additional sources of energy and supplement their photosynthetic lifestyle.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 12:00 PM EDT
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