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Newswise: Potential Means Of Improving Learning And Memory In People With Mental Illnesses
Released: 3-Dec-2020 8:05 AM EST
Potential Means Of Improving Learning And Memory In People With Mental Illnesses
Johns Hopkins Medicine

More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses. But, drug treatments specifically able to target the learning, memory and concentration problems that may accompany such disorders remain elusive.

Newswise: Molecular Biology of the Cell seeks early-career editors to focus on curating preprints
Released: 3-Dec-2020 7:25 AM EST
Molecular Biology of the Cell seeks early-career editors to focus on curating preprints
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) is assembling an editorial board of early-career researchers dedicated to curating and classifying the impact of new articles published in MBoC and preprints posted on bioRxiv. Supported by a Learned Society Curation Award from the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute awarded to MBoC’s publisher, the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB), this new board of diverse, young editors will contribute to curation and recognition of research works across the subjects covered by MBoC.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 6:05 PM EST
How Caregivers of People with Dementia Can Navigate Holidays During the Pandemic
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

As COVID-19 cases increase across the nation, many caregivers are trying to navigate the holidays for relatives with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that people not travel to limit the potential spread of the coronavirus. Mary Catherine Lundquist, program director of Care2Caregivers, a peer counseling helpline (800-424-2494) for caregivers of people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease operated by Rutgers Behavioral Health Care, discusses how families can stay connected with their loved ones.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 5:05 PM EST
Male-dominated background affects CEOs' decisions, new study finds
Arizona State University (ASU)

Male CEOs who experienced gender imbalance in their formative years are more likely to promote women into peripheral divisions of their companies and give them less capital, according to a recent study by W. P. Carey School of Business Professor Denis Sosyura.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 5:05 PM EST
Autism Study Suggests Connection Between Repetitive Behaviors, Gut Problems
Ohio State University

In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties.

Newswise: Some Like It Hot: Boosting Efficiency in Solar Cells
Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:30 PM EST
Some Like It Hot: Boosting Efficiency in Solar Cells
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Novel hot-carrier solar cells convert sunlight to electricity more efficiently than conventional solar cells by harnessing charge carriers before they lose their energy to heat. A key to keeping electric charges hot longer is to slow the phonons that transport heat. Recent research shows that thermal transport—and thus performance—in hot-carrier solar cells can be reduced by replacing hydrogen atoms with heavier deuterium atoms.

Newswise: New Platform Generates Hybrid Light-Matter Excitations in Highly Charged Graphene
Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:25 PM EST
New Platform Generates Hybrid Light-Matter Excitations in Highly Charged Graphene
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia University researchers report that they have achieved plasmonically active graphene with record-high charge density without an external gate. They accomplished this by exploiting novel interlayer charge transfer with a two-dimensional electron-acceptor known as -RuCl3. “This work allows us to use graphene as a plasmonic material without metal gates or voltage sources, making it possible to create stand-alone graphene plasmonic structures for the first time,” said Mechanical Engineering Prof. James Hone.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:10 PM EST
AAA to Hold Independent Annual Meeting in 2023
American Association for Anatomy (AAA)

Experimental Biology, an annual scientific meeting of five host societies (including AAA) drawing more than 12,000 researchers, educators, and students from around the globe, will hold its final meeting in 2022, after which AAA will launch its own stand-alone annual meeting for anatomy.

Newswise: New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:10 PM EST
New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Researchers inactivated the gene for CHD7 — whose mutation causes congenital birth defects — in mouse embryos, and then rigorously probed how this change in developing cardiac neural crest cells caused severe defects in the outflow tract and great arteries, leading to perinatal lethality.

Newswise: Incredible Vision in Ancient Marine Creatures Drove an Evolutionary Arms Race
Released: 2-Dec-2020 4:05 PM EST
Incredible Vision in Ancient Marine Creatures Drove an Evolutionary Arms Race
University of Adelaide

Ancient deep sea creatures called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race according to new research published today.

30-Nov-2020 8:05 AM EST
Study Finds 10 Metabolites Associated with Risk of Stroke
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Metabolites are small molecules found in our body’s cells. They come from the food we eat, chemical processes happening within our bodies and microbes. A new analysis of recent studies has found that the levels of 10 metabolites detected in the blood are associated with a person’s risk of stroke. The research is published in the December 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-use-geometry-to-track-cell-migrations
VIDEO
Released: 2-Dec-2020 3:55 PM EST
Scientists Use Geometry to Track Cell Migrations
University of California San Diego

A team of physicists and biologists investigate the effect that the geometry of the biological environment has on cellular movement. Their findings are published in the journal Science.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 3:50 PM EST
Tip Sheet: Celebrate holidays safely, COVID-19 vaccines, challenges in HIV vaccine trials — and new insights on evolution
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

SEATTLE – Dec. 2, 2020 – Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.If you’re following the American Society of Hematology’s annual meeting (virtual, Dec. 5-8), see our media tip sheet highlighting Fred Hutch presentations and activities, including those by current ASH president Dr.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 3:15 PM EST
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Urges HHS to Permanently Remove Barriers to CRNA Practice
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

As COVID-19 cases surge across the country, the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) is urging the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to make a waiver that suspends physician supervision requirements of nurse anesthetists permanent.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 3:05 PM EST
CEO Charles Macfarlane to retire after leading Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists through major strategic initiatives
Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists (ADCES)

Charles Macfarlane, FACHE, CAE, announced he will retire as chief executive officer of the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists (ADCES) after eight years in which he oversaw significant strategic initiatives and expansion in the role of diabetes care and education specialists. ADCES will conduct a nationwide search for a new CEO.

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Embargo will expire: 4-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 2-Dec-2020 3:00 PM EST

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Newswise:Video Embedded new-machine-learning-tool-tracks-urban-traffic-congestion
VIDEO
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:50 PM EST
New Machine Learning Tool Tracks Urban Traffic Congestion
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Using public data from the entire 1,500-square-mile Los Angeles metropolitan area, PNNL researchers reduced the time needed to create a traffic congestion model by an order of magnitude, from hours to minutes.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:40 PM EST
Extended Deadline for Nominations: Award for Excellence in Media Reporting on Education Research
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) has extended the deadline for submitting nominations for the Excellence in Media Reporting on Education Research Award to Tuesday, December 22, 2020.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:40 PM EST
To Increase Organs Available for Transplantation, Reassess Organ Procurement Organizations’ Metrics
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

In a new paper, published in JAMA Surgery, researchers found the metrics used to rank organ procurement organizations don’t create an even playing field for organizations, and lead to inaccuracies.

Newswise: Patient with aortic aneurysm benefits from innovative, minimally invasive procedure
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:40 PM EST
Patient with aortic aneurysm benefits from innovative, minimally invasive procedure
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When Rodolfo Sandoval was told he would need to undergo open surgery to repair his thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm, he hesitated. At 73 years old, he was worried about the recovery process for a major, invasive procedure. Then COVID-19 arrived and he made the decision that he would only consider the surgery if it became a life or death situation.

Newswise: “This is how we can help” – Couple shares their story as COVID-19 clinical trial participants
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:35 PM EST
“This is how we can help” – Couple shares their story as COVID-19 clinical trial participants
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

“I don’t feel so great,” my husband, Brandon, said to me one Saturday afternoon – the last thing I wanted to hear after spending the last seven months tuned into COVID-19 media coverage. Knowing a few of his co-workers had recently tested positive for the virus, we didn’t wait to secure an appointment for a rapid test. When he called me an hour later to tell me he has tested positive, my heart sank.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:35 PM EST
IPC Statement On SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines And Psoriasis
International Psoriasis Council

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic continues to have a considerable impact on the provision of appropriate care to people with psoriasis.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:20 PM EST
Rutgers Institute for Health Receives $10M to Study Health and Well-Being in New Jersey
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

The Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research has received $10 million in funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Rutgers University to support the New Jersey Population Health Cohort study – the largest study to date to explore factors that influence health and well-being in New Jersey.

Newswise: 250232_web.jpg
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:10 PM EST
New glue sticks easily, holds strongly, and is a gas to pull apart
Dartmouth College

Temporary glues may not steal headlines, but they can make everyday life easier.

Newswise: 250245_web.jpg
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:05 PM EST
Differences in immunity and blood vessels likely protect children from severe COVID-19
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

Differences in the immune systems and better blood vessel health were among the factors protecting children from severe COVID-19, according to a new review.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST
Study on placenta membrane cells identifies new genetic markers associated with preterm birth
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new research study from the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center led by investigators at the University of Chicago has identified new genetic markers associated with gestational length, providing new insights into potential risk factors for preterm birth.

Newswise: Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST
Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, may help resolve what’s known as the faint young sun paradox – a lingering key question in Mars science.

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Embargo will expire: 4-Dec-2020 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 2-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST

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Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:55 PM EST
Discrimination on social media results in higher depression, anxiety among minority males
Florida International University (FIU)

Exposure to ethnic discrimination on social media is associated with higher symptoms of depression and anxiety among young Hispanic males, according to a study by researchers at Florida International University's Robert Stempel College of Public Health & Social Work.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 3-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 2-Dec-2020 1:50 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Bringing harmony to chaos: UTHealth trauma surgeon repairs lives
Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:45 PM EST
Bringing harmony to chaos: UTHealth trauma surgeon repairs lives
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

By the time first responders rushed the patient to Red Duke Trauma Institute at Memorial Hermann-TMC, life was already slipping away through a stab wound in the neck. The goal of the team: resuscitate and transfer the patient to the operating room, where Laura J. Moore, MD, with UTHealth, would reconstruct his severed blood vessels.

Newswise: Researcher receives $1.3 million grant to improve breast cancer treatment for Black women
Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:35 PM EST
Researcher receives $1.3 million grant to improve breast cancer treatment for Black women
Indiana University

An Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher is identifying the unique biology that may make Black women more susceptible to aggressive breast cancer.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:30 PM EST
American Society of Anesthesiologists Urges Medicare to Keep Physician-led Anesthesia Care to Protect Older Patients and Patients with Disabilities
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently issued a request for information regarding waivers declared during the COVID-19 pandemic, including one that removed physician anesthesiologists from anesthesia care and replaced them with nurses. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) urges Americans to protect older patients and those with disabilities by posting a comment to the Federal Register asking the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to rescind the temporary policy that lowers the standard of care and risks patients’ lives.

Newswise: Telemedicine Use During COVID-19 Shows Access Disparity Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients
Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:30 PM EST
Telemedicine Use During COVID-19 Shows Access Disparity Among Head and Neck Cancer Patients
Henry Ford Health System

Retrospective research by Henry Ford otolaryngologists found telemedicine use disparity among head and neck cancer patients during start of COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise:Video Embedded oddly-satisfying-metamaterials-store-energy-in-their-skin
VIDEO
Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:25 PM EST
Oddly satisfying metamaterials store energy in their skin
Purdue University

When you press the dimpled circles on a fountain drink lid, they become either convex or concave. Materials or structures that have two stable states demonstrate a concept called bistability.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:15 PM EST
Researchers determine how the SARS-CoV-2 virus hijacks and rapidly causes damage to human lung cells
Boston University School of Medicine

In a multi-group collaborative involving the National Emerging Infectious Disease Laboratories (NEIDL), the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM), and the Center for Network Systems Biology (CNSB), scientists have reported the first map of the molecular responses of human lung cells to infection by SARS-CoV-2.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:10 PM EST
Brexit opens the door to tougher anti-smoking measures
University of Bath

Brexit offers the UK opportunities to strengthen its world-leading tobacco control measures, by creating greater flexibility to respond to industry action and market developments, according to new research from the University of Bath.

Newswise: Research Finds Little Progress on Worldwide Blindness in a Decade
Released: 2-Dec-2020 1:05 PM EST
Research Finds Little Progress on Worldwide Blindness in a Decade
John A. Moran Eye Center

Sobering new statistics released by the Global Burden of Disease study found no significant reduction in the number of people with treatable sight loss worldwide since 2010 as public health services failed to meet World Health Organization (WHO) targets.

Newswise: Circadian Gene Mutation Increases Self-Administration of Cocaine in Mice
1-Dec-2020 10:15 AM EST
Circadian Gene Mutation Increases Self-Administration of Cocaine in Mice
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh researchers reveal a molecular basis for the deep and fundamental connection between the disruption in circadian rhythms and predisposition to substance abuse.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 12:45 PM EST
Xenophobic and racist policies in the US may have harmful effect on birth outcomes
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

The first U.S. Executive Order of the 2017 travel ban targeting individuals from Muslim majority countries may be associated with preterm births for women from those countries residing in the U.S., according to a new study conducted at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 12:35 PM EST
Technion Harvey Prize Honors Pioneers in Chemical Engineering and Medical Sciences
American Technion Society

The prestigious prize for 2019-2020 goes to Professor Joseph DeSimone of Stanford University for significant contributions to materials science, chemistry, polymer science nano medicine, and 3D printing; and to Professor Raphael Mechoulam of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for the discovery of the active molecules in cannabis

Released: 2-Dec-2020 12:35 PM EST
Greenland ice sheet faces irreversible melting
University of Reading

In a study published this week in The Cryosphere, researchers from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science and University of Reading demonstrate how climate change could lead to irreversible sea level rise as temperatures continue to rise and the Greenland ice sheet continues to decline.

Released: 2-Dec-2020 12:25 PM EST
Continents prone to destruction in their infancy, study finds
Monash University

Monash University geologists have shed new light on the early history of the Earth through their discovery that continents were weak and prone to destruction in their infancy.

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Embargo will expire: 9-Dec-2020 4:15 PM EST Released to reporters: 2-Dec-2020 12:25 PM EST

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