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Newswise: Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
Released: 7-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms
University of California San Diego

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used SDSC's Comet supercomputer to validate a model using a machine learning technique called Dynamic Time Lag Regression (DTLR) to help predict the solar wind arrival near the Earth’s orbit from physical parameters of the Sun.

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Embargo will expire: 10-Jul-2020 1:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-Jul-2020 3:00 PM EDT

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:45 PM EDT
COVID-19 in Patients Who Have Received Kidney Transplants or Are Undergoing Dialysis
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• A recent study found that most kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 do not need to be hospitalized. • Another study found that patients on dialysis who develop COVID-19 may have symptoms that are different from other patients with the infectious disease.

Newswise: LLLNL Director Bill Goldstein Announces Retirement Pending Search for Successor
Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
LLLNL Director Bill Goldstein Announces Retirement Pending Search for Successor
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

William H. Goldstein today announced he will retire as director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and president of Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) following the selection of his successor.

Newswise: Welcome, Robin the AI robot
Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Welcome, Robin the AI robot
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital launched an innovative project to support the emotional needs of children through a new AI powered robot. Robin’s technology enables the robot to build what is called associative memory — it recognizes a child’s emotions by interpreting his or her facial expressions and builds responsive dialogue by replicating patterns formed from previous experiences.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Law clinic wins access to COVID-19 race data
Cornell University

The First Amendment Clinic at Cornell Law School, working on behalf of its client, The New York Times, helped secure the release of previously unseen data that provides the most detailed look yet at nearly 1.5 million American coronavirus patients from 974 counties across the country.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Increased Risk of COVID-19 Among Users of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)
American College of Gastroenterology (ACG)

Findings from an online survey of more than 53,000 American adults suggest that using heartburn medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) once or twice daily significantly increases the odds of a positive test for COVID-19 compared to those who do not take PPIs. This research appeared online July 7, 2020 in pre-print format in The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Newswise: University of Miami Miller School Plays Pivotal Role in Securing a $15 Million National Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
University of Miami Miller School Plays Pivotal Role in Securing a $15 Million National Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine investigators play a pivotal role in a consortium of Florida institutions just awarded a $15 million grant to collaborate on Alzheimer’s disease research. The five-year National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging grant brings together top Florida researchers to focus on better understanding how to diagnose, treat, prevent, and potentially cure Alzheimer’s in diverse populations.

Newswise: Seaver Autism Center For Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai Launches First Drug Trial for ADNP Syndrome
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Seaver Autism Center For Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai Launches First Drug Trial for ADNP Syndrome
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai have started recruiting participants for a new clinical trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a low dose of ketamine in children diagnosed with ADNP syndrome (also known as Helsmoortel-VanDerAa syndrome), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) gene.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Telemedicine helps Missouri dermatologist detect melanoma
American Academy of Dermatology

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has named board-certified dermatologist Kari Lyn Martin, MD, FAAD, a Patient Care Hero for using telemedicine to diagnose and remove a patient’s melanoma the same day.

Newswise: Precise Measurement of Pions Confirms Understanding 
of Fundamental Symmetry
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Precise Measurement of Pions Confirms Understanding of Fundamental Symmetry
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Nuclear physicists have announced the most precise measurement yet of the ultra-short lifetime of the neutral pion. The result is an important validation of our understanding of the theory of quantum chromodynamics, which describes the makeup of ordinary matter. The research, carried out at the Department of Energy’s Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was recently published in the journal Science.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
COVID-related discrimination disproportionately impacts racial minorities, study shows
University of Southern California (USC)

Discrimination against people thought to be infected with coronavirus was experienced by a rising number of United States residents, particularly racial minorities, in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study from the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:35 PM EDT
1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
University of Zurich

Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Newswise: Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Community science birding data does not yet capture global bird trends
University of Utah

Ornithologists at the University of Utah say that community science bird data shows different trends in bird populations than professional bird surveys do, especially in developing countries. More observations are needed, the researchers say, both by birders and professionals.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
A chemical cocktail of air pollution in Beijing, China during COVID-19 outbreak
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spreads rapidly around the world, and has limited people's outdoor activities substantially.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Dopamine neurons mull over your options
University of Tsukuba

In Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Indiana must choose his grail "wisely", as a poor choice spells instant death.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 8-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 7-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 8-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 1:00 PM EDT
McLean Hospital's Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, Named Editor of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
McLean Hospital

McLean Hospital’s Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, has been named editor of the journal Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience (CABN).

Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Women's egg quality dependent on metabolic factors
University of Queensland

In the world's most in-depth study of the final steps of egg maturation, the quality of a woman's eggs was found to be significantly dependent on the important metabolic coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+).

Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Remdesivir can save more lives where ICUs are overwhelmed
Boston University School of Medicine

Amid news that the United States has bought up virtually the entire global supply of remdesivir, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study outlines how the drug could save lives in countries with less hospital capacity, such as South Africa, where COVID-19 is beginning to overwhelm intensive care units (ICUs).

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Named Age-Friendly Health System
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Named Age-Friendly Health System
Cedars-Sinai

Shortly after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic, more than 450 older adults learned their weekly exercise classes offered through the Cedars-Sinai Geriatrics Program were on hold. But under the quick-thinking direction of geriatrician Allison Moser Mays, MD, the program pivoted, creating a way for seniors to access live classes over Zoom from the comfort of their homes. The online format has proved especially popular.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tree rings show unprecedented rise in extreme weather in South America
Earth Institute at Columbia University

Scientists have filled a gaping hole in the world's climate records by reconstructing 600 years of soil-moisture swings across southern and central South America.

Newswise: A New Understanding of Protein Movement
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:20 PM EDT
A New Understanding of Protein Movement
University of Delaware

A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing. This work will lead to the creation of new ways to reduce waste during the expensive drug manufacturing process, enabling more efficient ways of designing and developing manufacturing techniques.

Newswise: Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Tulane University receives $12.5 million for military veteran care
Tulane University

Tulane University, nationally renowned for the care it provides to retired professional athletes through partnerships with the NFL Player Care Foundation and The Trust (Powered by the NFLPA), has received a $12.5 million gift from The Avalon Fund for the creation of the Tulane University Center for Brain Health. The center will specialize in the treatment of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in U.S. military veterans, beginning in the fall of 2020.

Newswise: A Study Provides New Insights Into van der Waals Materials
Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
A Study Provides New Insights Into van der Waals Materials
Penn State Materials Research Institute

Van der Waals materials that are layered on top of each other are of high interest for electronic and photonic applications. A recent study by Penn State and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in California, provides new insights into the interactions of layered materials with laser and electron beams.

Newswise: WashU Expert: Eviction moratoriums are incomplete solution
Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
WashU Expert: Eviction moratoriums are incomplete solution
Washington University in St. Louis

Millions of tenants are at risk of eviction as protections in the CARES Act are set to expire. While the U.S. Congress and Senate are proposing plans to extend the federal moratorium on evictions, a finance expert at Washington University in St. Louis warns that is just one piece of the puzzle.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Medicare’s Race, Ethnic Data Often Undercounts Minority Populations, Study Finds
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Information critical to a nationwide priority of reducing health care disparities among minorities is incomplete and inaccurate, according to a new Rutgers study

Newswise:Video Embedded loyola-medicine-specialist-transforms-face-for-cancer-patient
VIDEO
Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Loyola Medicine Specialist Transforms Face for Cancer Patient
Loyola Medicine

When 62-year-old Bartlett resident Norvell Bujarski was diagnosed with cancer, it was advanced. When he learned that he had squamous cell cancer of the nasal cavity, he didn’t want to settle for noninvasive approaches that may only offer him a partial extension of his life. He wanted to live a full life and was seeking a cure. In order to remove all of his tumors, Mr. Bujarski’s cancer surgeon would have to remove his entire nose including bone and tissue, eight of his front teeth and part of the roof of his mouth. When he needed a maxillofacial prosthesis to restore his form and function, he went to Dr. Charles Palin at Loyola University Medical Center's Oral Health Center.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Beaumont researchers develop COVID-19 test that can detect virus in saliva, blood or urine in 45 minutes
Beaumont Health

Rapid test for COVID-19 can help contain the virus and contribute to a successful reopening of the economy

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Higher Manganese Levels in Early Pregnancy Linked to Lower Preeclampsia Risk
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

An analysis of data from more than 1,300 women followed prospectively through pregnancy found that women with lower levels of the essential mineral manganese in early pregnancy were more likely to develop the serious high blood pressure syndrome called preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Study: surgical delay associated with increased risk in some gastrointestinal malignancies
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, widespread cancellations of electively-scheduled or “non-emergency” operations were implemented to free up hospital beds and conserve protective equipment for health care workers. For some conditions, including cancer, timely surgery is critical for patients’ survival. In a new study published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, a team of investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) examined the effects of delaying surgery for gastrointestinal cancers.

7-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Sensory Neurons Outside the Brain Drive Autistic Social Behaviors, Penn Study Suggests
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A new study from Penn Medicine lends further evidence that the social behaviors tied to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) emerge from abnormal function of sensory neurons outside the brain.

2-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Newer Solar Power Equipment Ages Better Than Older Units
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Utility-scale photovoltaics are the largest sector of the overall solar market within the U.S. and the fastest-growing form of renewable power generation, and this fleet of utility-scale photovoltaic projects is relatively young and hasn’t been operating long enough to establish a lengthy history of operational field service. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers assess the performance of 411 utility-scale photovoltaic projects built within the U.S. from 2007 through 2016.

Newswise: Cooling Mechanism Increases Solar Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Outdoor Sensors
1-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Cooling Mechanism Increases Solar Energy Harvesting for Self-Powered Outdoor Sensors
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Thermoelectric devices, which use the temperature difference between the top and bottom of the device to generate power, offer some promise for harnessing naturally occurring energy. In Applied Physics Letters, authors tested a device made up of a wavelength-selective emitter that constantly cools the device during the day using radiative cooling. As a result, the top of the device is cooler than the bottom, causing a temperature difference that creates constant voltage through day and night and various weather conditions.

Newswise: Plant-Based Diets Support Healthy Testosterone Levels
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Plant-Based Diets Support Healthy Testosterone Levels
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Men who follow plant-based diets have testosterone levels that are basically the same as the levels in men who eat meat, a study shows. This finding dispels a widespread notion that men need large amounts of animal protein in order to support healthy levels of this hormone.

Newswise: Research explores how youth are excluded from public spaces, design practices
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Research explores how youth are excluded from public spaces, design practices
Iowa State University

America’s youth have historically been excluded from using public spaces how they want, in addition to being left out of design discussions. Including them in this process will have long-term societal benefits, according to an Iowa State University researcher.

Newswise: The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
The science of sound: Researchers suggest use of artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark
McMaster University

Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Expanded Efforts, Focused Approach
University of Kansas Cancer Center

Physicians and scientists at The University of Kansas Cancer Center are committed to improving lung cancer outcomes in Kansas.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
New Research Reveals Regulatory Features Of The Maize Genome During Early Reproductive Development
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

A team of researchers led by Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, has mapped out the non-coding, ‘functional’ genome in maize during an early developmental window critical to formation of pollen-bearing tassels and grain-bearing ears.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Talking with parents empowers Latino youths to engage in community
University of Michigan

When Latino youths lend their voices to political causes—from immigration policies that have separated families to recent Black Lives Matter protests—their resilience originates from home.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 8-Jul-2020 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 7-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Bristol engineers pioneer project to protect Nepal’s future generations from earthquakes
University of Bristol

In 2015, a devastating earthquake in Nepal resulted in the loss of 9,000 lives, 3.5 million people left homeless and entire neighbourhoods flattened. To prevent destruction on the same scale again, the multidisciplinary team behind The SAFER Nepal Project has been working with local partners to improve the seismic safety and resilience of school and community buildings in Nepal.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Colleges that emphasize activism have more civically engaged students, new research shows
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Students tend to be more engaged in activism if the school that they attend emphasizes social and political issues, according to new research featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: GettyImages%20Sickle%20Cell.jpg
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:35 AM EDT
COVID-19: What you should know if you have sickle cell disease
LifeBridge Health

If you have sickle cell disease, you are at higher risk than the general population for severe complications from COVID-19.

Newswise: The HSUS Announces Forward Food Collaborative Webinar for Food Service: The plant-based solution to a global pandemic
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
The HSUS Announces Forward Food Collaborative Webinar for Food Service: The plant-based solution to a global pandemic
Monday Campaigns

Speakers from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), Informed Sustainability Consulting, and Meatless Monday will explore how plant-based menu items can assist food service dining operations during these challenging times.

Newswise: How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
How to Tackle Climate Change, Food Security and Land Degradation
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

How can some of world’s biggest problems – climate change, food security and land degradation – be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Global Change Biology.

Newswise: Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists use nanoparticle-delivered gene therapy to limit blinding retinal disease in rodents.

Newswise: Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Symbiotic underground fungi disperse by wind, new study finds
DePaul University

A new study published in the journal New Phytologist from a research team led by environmental scientist Bala Chaudhary at DePaul University uncovered previously undiscovered patterns in the dispersal of mycorrhizal fungi that could help ecologists understand how these beneficial fungi travel.


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