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Newswise: Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
20-Oct-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Scientists use gene therapy and a novel light-sensing protein to restore vision in mice
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

A newly developed light-sensing protein called the MCO1 opsin restores vision in blind mice when attached to retina bipolar cells using gene therapy. The National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, provided a Small Business Innovation Research grant to Nanoscope, LLC for development of MCO1. The company is planning a U.S. clinical trial for later this year.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Preventing lead poisoning at the source
Case Western Reserve University

Using a variety of public records—including assessed market value, sales, foreclosure and tax history, code violations, building permits and rental registry data—the researchers examined every rental property in Cleveland from 2016-18 on factors related to the likelihood that the property could have lead-safety problems.

Newswise: Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
Released: 21-Oct-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Novel method for measuring spatial dependencies turns less data into more data
New York University

Institute Professor Maurizio Porfiri at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, devised a novel solution based on network and information theory that makes “little data” act big through, the application of mathematical techniques normally used for time-series, to spatial processes.

Newswise: 47 Mercy Medical Center Physicians Named Among Region's
Released: 21-Oct-2020 5:00 PM EDT
47 Mercy Medical Center Physicians Named Among Region's "TOP DOCTORS" in November 2020 Issue of BALTIMORE Magazine
Mercy Medical Center

A total of 47 Mercy Medical Center physicians were recognized in Baltimore magazine’s November 2020 “Top Doctors” issue, representing 38 separate specialties, ranging from orthopedic surgery to weight management.

Newswise: Paul Torrens Health Forum |
Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Paul Torrens Health Forum | "The 2020 Presidential Election: What’s at Stake for Health?"
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The outcome of the presidential election will determine our nation’s path forward on numerous health and healthcare fronts. As the nation continues to grapple with COVID-19, systemic racism, climate change and other critical public health issues, there’s much at stake. Join us for an insightful session moderated by Gerald Kominski, professor at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor and senior fellow at FSPH’s UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. The program will feature two health policy experts, Dr. Lanhee Chen of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University and Mark Peterson, professor of public policy, political science and law at UCLA, discussing the Democratic and Republican health platforms, their key policy implications, and how each reflects the party’s vision for the nation’s health. An optional small group networking session will follow the webinar.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Cognitive performance - Better than our predecessors
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Munich)

We employ our cognitive skills daily to assimilate and process information. A new empirical study shows that we do better at this task than those born a century ago. But cognitive capacity still begins to stagnate at around the age of 35.

Newswise: Covid-19 Interventions Can Cut Virus Infections, Severe Outcomes, and Healthcare Needs
Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Covid-19 Interventions Can Cut Virus Infections, Severe Outcomes, and Healthcare Needs
Georgia Institute of Technology

Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as voluntary shelter-in-place, quarantines, and other steps taken to control the SARS-CoV-2 virus can reduce the peak number of infections, daily infection rates, cumulative infections, and overall deaths, a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has found.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT
The First Book of Breathing: A new assessment based on an edition of papyrus FMNH 31324
University Of Chicago Press Journals

Papyrus FMNH31324 was acquired by the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago on May 24, 1894, after collector Edward E. Ayer purchased the papyrus for the museum while in Europe.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 22-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Neuroprotective Treatment for Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of cognitive impairment that affects millions of people worldwide. Despite growing awareness about the debilitating and lifelong progressive consequences of TBI, there are currently no treatments that slow the deteriorative process. TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration. Now, researchers have found for the first time that this process can be pharmacologically reversed in an animal model of this chronic health condition, offering an important proof of principle in the field and a potential path to new therapy.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 22-Oct-2020 6:30 PM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Oct-2020 6:30 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

15-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Could Reducing Painful Procedures Help Premature Infants’ Brains?
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Premature infants born earlier than 28 weeks gestation who experience fewer needle pokes while receiving life-saving care in the neonatal intensive care unit may have better growth of a part of the brain called the thalamus. The new study is published in the October 21, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Viral Facebook image does not show a coronavirus testing patent was submitted in 2015
Newswise

A post of an image showing "evidence" of a patent application for a novel coronavirus test in 2015 by a person named Richard A. Rothschild was shared by hundreds of users. This claim is false. The image shows a supplemental application that was filed in 2020 following the submission of another patent application in 2015 that was not related to the coronavirus. A spokesperson for the financial services firm Rothschild & Co. said the patent’s applicant had no link to the company.

Newswise: 246482_web.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Social isolation exacerbates the situation of school bullying victims
University of Cordoba

In school bullying, there are people who are chronic victims.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Pastoral care shown to support older people at risk from COVID-19
Staffordshire University

Volunteers from the Catholic Church in Brazil helped to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 among the elderly, a new study shows.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 23-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Gift creates clinical appointment in the field of Art of the Spanish Americas at UIC’s CADA
Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Gift creates clinical appointment in the field of Art of the Spanish Americas at UIC’s CADA
University of Illinois at Chicago

UIC is the only Ph.D.-granting department of art history in Chicago with a specialist in this area

Newswise: UH Implements Virtual Waiting Room for Patients During COVID-19 Pandemic
Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:30 PM EDT
UH Implements Virtual Waiting Room for Patients During COVID-19 Pandemic
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

UH has implemented PatientTrak, a virtual waiting room that enables the patient to communicate effectively with staff so they can arrive at their appointment on time while avoiding an in-person waiting room.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Stigma Impacts Psychological, Physical Health of Multiracial People
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Policy changes can help to fight stigmas of multiracial Americans, one of the fasting growing minority groups in the United States according to a Rutgers University-led study.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Why Do White Americans Support Both Strict Immigration Policies and DREAM Act?
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
University of Edinburgh

Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for Covid-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests.

Newswise: 246501_web.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:10 PM EDT
MonoEye: A human motion capture system using a single wearable camera
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Carnegie Mellon University have together developed a new human motion capture system that consists of a single ultra-wide fisheye camera mounted on the user's chest.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 3:05 PM EDT
A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
ETH Zürich

There are places that will always be beyond our reach. The Earth's interior is one of them.

Newswise: 246506_web.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Paper: Congress must clarify limits of gene-editing technologies
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Genome editing of human embryos represents one of the most contentious potential scientific applications today. But what if geneticists could sidestep the controversy by editing sperm and eggs instead?

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Mayo Clinic contributes to diagnostic, therapeutic advance for rare neurodegenerative disorder
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers, along with national and global collaborators, have developed a potential test for Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) ― a disease that has no cure. They also have clarified the role of a gene target associated with the disease.

Newswise: 246535_web.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:50 PM EDT
How do snakes 'see' in the dark? Researchers have an answer
University of Houston

Certain species of snake - think pit vipers, boa constrictors and pythons, among others - are able to find and capture prey with uncanny accuracy, even in total darkness.

Newswise: 246543_web.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Observed COVID-19 variability may have underlying molecular sources
University of California, Riverside

People have different susceptibilities to SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, and develop varying degrees of fever, fatigue, and breathing problems -- common symptoms of the illness. What might explain this variation?

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:20 PM EDT
ARN Recognizes 2020 Role Award Winners during Virtual Conference
Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

This week the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (ARN) announced recipients of the 2020 ARN Role Awards at its Annual Educational Conference, REACH, held virtually. ARN Role Awards are given for outstanding contributions in various aspects of rehabilitation nursing.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:15 PM EDT
RNCB Names Bryan Medical Center 2020 Advocacy Award Winner
Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

Yesterday, the Rehabilitation Nursing Certification Board (RNCB) announced the recipient of the 2nd annual RNCB Advocacy Award during REACH 2020, ARN’s Annual Educational Conference taking place virtually this week, October 20-22.

Newswise: What A Crystal Reveals About Nuclear Materials Processing
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
What A Crystal Reveals About Nuclear Materials Processing
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL researchers devised a new method to probe the atomic structure of plutonium-containing microcrystals using laboratory-based equipment.

Newswise: Hospital closures in rural America means longer drive times for patients needing care
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Hospital closures in rural America means longer drive times for patients needing care
University of Alabama at Birmingham

For many rural Americans, especially those in the South or Southeastern areas of the country, it is taking longer to get to a hospital. Delays in reaching appropriate health care facilities could have a profound negative effect in cases of medical emergency.

Newswise: Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A team of researchers from the Rogel Cancer Center received an $11.2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study how to use the microbiome to limit complications of stem cell transplants for blood cancers and other diseases.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Hospitals Leaned Toward Strict COVID-19 NICU Policies Despite Low Prevalence of Infection, New Study Finds
George Washington University

Two studies examining the impact of COVID-19 on neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) found the prevalence of COVID-19 in NICU infants is low, yet many hospitals at the start of the pandemic put in place strict parental visitation policies and scaled back NICU services such as lactation support and therapy.

Newswise: Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 Virus with Genome Sequencing
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Tracking the SARS-CoV-2 Virus with Genome Sequencing
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Dirk Dittmer, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology at the UNC School of Medicine, is tracking the virus that causes COVID-19 by sequencing the genome of virus samples collected from diagnostic testing. Using next generation sequencing on SARS-CoV-2 will help accurately diagnose the novel coronavirus, identify mutations and track its history.

Newswise: lbnf-near-site-20-0037-09.jpg
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
In photos: Fermilab site preparation for LBNF nears completion
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

All summer long, progress on preparing the Fermilab site for the construction of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility has been proceeding at a healthy clip. Now, as summer winds down, that site prep is nearing completion.

Newswise: Storytime Benefits Babies, Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Storytime Benefits Babies, Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
Cedars-Sinai

It's not what you would expect to see in a hospital neonatal intensive care unit, but these days, the Cedars-Sinai NICU, part of the Maxine Dunitz Children's Health Center, is filled with children's books and parents reading to their babies.

Newswise:Video Embedded alma-shows-volcanic-impact-on-io-s-atmosphere
VIDEO
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:00 PM EDT
ALMA Shows Volcanic Impact on Io’s Atmosphere
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

New radio images from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) show for the first time the direct effect of volcanic activity on the atmosphere of Jupiter’s moon Io.

Newswise: More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
21-Oct-2020 9:30 AM EDT
More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
McMaster University

An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet. The findings highlight the potential therapeutic value of targeting tryptophan metabolism in the gut in celiac disease to better control symptoms, despite the gluten-free diet, and accelerate intestinal healing.

Newswise: angie_06-11-10_061.jpg
20-Oct-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Building Blocks of Language Evolved 30-40 Million Years Ago
University of Warwick

Language is one of the most powerful tools available to humanity, and determining why and when language evolved is central to understand what it means to be human

Newswise: PPPL physicist to receive Edison Award for fusion-powered rocket propulsion
Released: 21-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
PPPL physicist to receive Edison Award for fusion-powered rocket propulsion
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

PPPL physicist Sam Cohen will receive an Edison Award for his invention with collaborators of a compact rocket engine thruster propelled by a small fusion reactor.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice. The findings are published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Healthy Lung Month: Know these pulmonary fibrosis risk factors
Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

October is Healthy Lung Month, an apt time to educate the public about the importance of protecting our lungs against mold, airborne pollutants and smoking – which put hundreds of thousands of Americans at higher risk for pulmonary fibrosis (PF).

Newswise: Berkeley Lab Building Efficiency Campaign Drives $95M in Annual Energy Savings
Released: 21-Oct-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Berkeley Lab Building Efficiency Campaign Drives $95M in Annual Energy Savings
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

One hundred and four U.S. companies, schools, governments, and institutions are taking their building energy savings to a new level with the Department of Energy’s Smart Energy Analytics Campaign, a four-year initiative funded through the Building Technologies Office and facilitated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to expand the use of energy management and information systems (EMIS) in commercial buildings.

Newswise: Dr. Michaela Dinan Named Co-Leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Yale Cancer Center
Released: 21-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Dr. Michaela Dinan Named Co-Leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Yale Cancer Center
Yale Cancer Center

Michaela A. Dinan, PhD, has been appointed Co-Leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Program at Yale Cancer Center.

Newswise: Genome archeologists discover a path to activate the immune response against cancer
Released: 21-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Genome archeologists discover a path to activate the immune response against cancer
University Health Network (UHN)

Ancient embedded elements in our DNA from generations past can activate a powerful immune response to kill cancer cells like an infection.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Study assessing how early childhood educators spend time away from students
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Much attention is paid to the work early childhood teachers do in the classroom, but their tasks away from their students can be just as essential to children’s learning and development.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Rutgers Pediatricians Sound Alarm on Decreased Flu Vaccinations, Immunizations for Children
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Two Rutgers New Jersey Medical School pediatricians discuss the importance of keeping children and adults up to date with immunizations during the coronavirus crisis.


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