Latest News

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
newswise-fb-share-

Showing results

110 of 214060
MottPoll_BikeSafety.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 1:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712873

Nearly 1 in 5 Parents Say Their Child Never Wears a Helmet While Riding a Bike

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds.

Released:
15-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
NYUlogoLarge2597.png
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 12:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 712807

Economists Find Net Benefit in Soda Tax

New York University

A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a “net good,” an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior.

Released:
14-May-2019 6:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Law and Public Policy

chp-logo.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-May-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 712897

Teens with ADHD Get More Traffic Violations for Risky Driving, Have Higher Crash Risk Regardless of Age When Licensed

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD.

Released:
15-May-2019 10:30 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Social and Behavioral Sciences

SOD-Oregon.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 7:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 712884

Can a Hands-on Model Help Forest Stakeholders Fight Tree Disease?

North Carolina State University

Sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to the timber industry. Scientists are using a 3D model called Tangible Landscape to help stakeholders work together to find ways to stop the disease's spread.

Released:
14-May-2019 5:00 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
DerekAngusHR.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 713067

Deep Sedation and Controlled Paralysis Do Not Improve Survival of Critically Ill Patients with Severe Breathing Difficulty

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Reversibly paralyzing and heavily sedating hospitalized patients with severe breathing problems do not improve outcomes in most cases, according to a clinical trial conducted at dozens of North American hospitals. The trial settles a long-standing debate in the critical care medicine community.

Released:
16-May-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
PAH.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 712481

Tumor-Suppressing Protein May Be Novel Target in PAH Therapy

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

In addition to suppressing tumors, the protein tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) may play a role in preventing or treating pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), according to research presented at ATS 2019.

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
GettyImages-1137513367.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:15 PM EDT

Article ID: 712810

Risk Score Guided Care Can Help Physicians Provide Better Care, Planning, and Services for High-Risk Pulmonary Patients, Study Finds

Intermountain Healthcare

A study of more than 17,000 patients finds a new laboratory-based method of estimating outcomes for patients with COPD may help physicians better provide proper care, referrals, and services for these patients at the end of life.

Released:
14-May-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713070

Big Data Reveals Hidden Subtypes of Sepsis

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Much like cancer, sepsis isn’t simply one condition, but rather many conditions with varying clinical characteristics that could benefit from different treatments, according to a study involving more than 100,000 patients. The findings could explain why several recent clinical trials have failed.

Released:
16-May-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment
infantwithlungproblemsinicu.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-May-2019 10:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 712574

Bacterial Pneumonia Predicts Ongoing Lung Problems in Infants Hospitalized for Acute Respiratory Failure

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Bacterial pneumonia appears to be linked to ongoing breathing problems in previously healthy infants who were hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure, according to research presented at ATS 2019.

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT
Open in New Tab
Comment

Showing results

110 of 214060

Chat now!