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Behavioral Flexibility Impaired After Exposure to Oxycodone

Brief usage of the painkiller oxycodone may impair behavioral flexibility even after that use ends, suggesting impaired decision-making as an enduring consequence of exposure, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 17 in the journal Learning and Memory.

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Aspirin or Blood Pressure Medication Before and After Surgery Does Not Reduce Risk of AKI

In patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, neither aspirin nor clonidine (a medication primarily used to treat high blood pressure) taken before and after surgery reduced the risk of acute kidney injury, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American Society of Nephrology’s annual Kidney Week meeting.

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Premature Infants Are Exposed to Unsafe Levels of Chemical in Medical Products Used to Save Their Lives

Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives.

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Controversial Medication Has Benefits for Breastfeeding

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A controversial medication used by breastfeeding women should not be restricted because of the benefits it offers mothers and their babies, according to researchers at the University of Adelaide.

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Hospital Workers Wash Hands Less Frequently Toward End of Shift, Study Finds

Hospital workers who deal directly with patients wash their hands less frequently as their workday progresses, probably because the demands of the job deplete the mental reserves they need to follow rules, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Project Reduces “Alarm Fatigue” in Hospitals by 80 Percent

The sound of monitor alarms in hospitals can save patients’ lives, but the frequency with which the monitors go off can also lead to “alarm fatigue,” in which caregivers become desensitized to the ubiquitous beeping.

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I-PASS Reduces Medical Error Injuries During Patient Handoff by 30%

Improvements in verbal and written communication between health care providers during patient handoffs can reduce injuries due to medical errors. I-PASS, an original system of bundled communication and team-training tools for handoff of patient care between providers resulted in a 30% reduction in injuries due to medical errors after its implementation across 9 institutions, according to a study released Nov. 6, 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Three-Minute Assessment Successfully Identifies Delirium in Hospitalized Elders

Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a brief and simple method to help hospital care providers recognize delirium in elderly patients

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1 in 5 Physicians Unaware Their Patients Have Central Venous Catheters

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Attending physicians and hospitalists in general medicine twice as likely to be unaware of the device's presence compared to interns and residents.

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Transforming Safety Net Practices Into Patient-Centered Medical Homes—Progress Report

A recently concluded demonstration project made meaningful progress toward introducing a "patient-centered medical home" approach at "safety net" practices serving vulnerable and underserved populations. Lessons learned in the course of developing and implementing the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative (SNMHI) are featured in a special November supplement to Medical Care. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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