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Medicine

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Johns Hopkins, Sean Berenholtiz, Infections, Hospital, Patient Safety, Ventilator

Johns Hopkins Study Shows One of the Deadliest Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Preventable

In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Medical Ethics, American Thoracic Society, Intensive Care, Healthcare Decisions, Decision Making, JAMA, patient outcomes

Penn Study Pinpoints Accuracy of ICU Doctors’ and Nurses’ Predictions of Patient Outcomes

Physicians in intensive care units routinely consider their patients’ chances of survival and recovery when guiding patients and family members in making important decisions about care plans. A new study is shedding light on the accuracy of those judgments — and for the first time also reveals the accuracy of ICU nurses’ predictions of patient outcomes. For example, the study shows that ICU physicians are better at predicting whether patients will be alive in six months than they are at predicting patients’ cognitive function in six months, and the more confident doctors are when making predictions, the more accurate those predictions tend to be.

Medicine

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Critical Care, Nursing, Hospital, Gi Bleeding, SUP, Acid Suppressive Medications, C Difficile, Clostridium Difficile, Pneumonia, hospital-acquired infection, Proton Pump Inhibitor, EMR

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Jun-2017 6:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Nursing Home, UTI, Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Catheter, Urinary Catheter, Patient Safety, Infection Control

Nursing Homes Cut Urinary Tract Infections in Half Through Focused Effort on Catheter Care

A new study shows a way to keep urinary catheters from posing as much of a risk to the 1.4 million Americans currently in long-term and post-acute care. The research shows that urinary tract infections related to catheters fell by 54 percent in 404 nursing homes in 38 states that took part in a national patient safety effort.

Medicine

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Blood Test, Healthcare, Infectious Disease, Healthcare Costs, drug-resistant infections, Public Health

New Blood Test Technology Reduces False Readings, Saves Costs, and Improves Care - Live Virtual Press Briefing with Researcher May 16

Research findings to be published about new blood test technology that will greatly reduce errors in labwork and improve care in public health and infectious disease. Press briefing scheduled for May 16, reserve press access to live virtual event now.

Medicine

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Study Shows Novel Device Significantly Reduces Blood Draw Contamination, Reduces Risks to Patients

A study at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) found that a novel device can significantly reduce contamination of blood cultures, potentially reducing risky overtreatment and unnecessary use of antibiotics for many patients. This approach could also substantially reduce healthcare costs, according to the study. Thousands of U.S. patients get their blood drawn every day for blood cultures in order to diagnose serious infections such as sepsis, which can be a deadly condition. A small but significant percentage of the blood cultures are contaminated, due in part to skin fragments containing bacteria that are dislodged during a blood draw. This leads to false results that can mislead clinicians into thinking a patient has a potentially serious bloodstream infection. The consequences are costly and put patients at risk.

Medicine

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Blood culture, Contamination, Bacterial Infection, Infectious Disease, Emergency Room, blood sample contamination

Virtual Press Briefing: Novel Device Reduces Blood Sample Contamination, Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs

Newswise hosts a virtual live press briefing on upcoming journal study with research results concerning a new blood collection technique that reduces contamination of blood samples and improves treatment outcomes.

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Media Briefing: Blood Test Device Improves Sepsis Detection and Antimicrobial Stewardship

In a virtual media briefing next Tuesday, May 16, at 11:30 a.m. EDT, noted infectious disease expert Mark Rupp, M.D. will detail the results of a forthcoming journal publication on a new device.

Medicine

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Physician age, Study, Hospitalized Patients, Patient Mortality, Hospitalists, age, Anupam Jena, Harvard Medical School, Yusuke Tsugawa, Hospital Based Internists, Hospital Based Internists Age, Internal Medicine Specialists, Medical Education, Continuing Education, Patient Treatment, Joseph Newhouse, Alan Zaslavsky, Daniel Blumenthal

Study Links Physician Age to Patient Mortality Risk

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At a glance: Hospitalized patients have a slightly higher risk of dying when treated by older hospitalists—internal medicine specialists who oversee the care of acutely ill hospitalized patients. Physician age made no difference in patient mortality rates for doctors who treated large numbers of patients. The results suggest the critical importance of continuing medical education throughout the span of a physician’s professional career. Age played no role in patient readmission rates but older physicians were slightly more likely to incur greater treatment costs.

Medicine

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Bacteria, Dr. Mark Wylam, Heart Transplant, Infection, Lung Transplant, Medical Research, Minnesota News Releases, Mycoplasma hominis, Transplant

Researchers Find Link Between Donor, Bacterial Infection in Heart, Lung Transplant Recipients

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a possible cause for a rare infection in heart and lung transplant recipients: the donor. The way in which heart and lung transplant recipients acquired a specific species of bacteria, Mycoplasma hominis, had been previously undefined, and the bacterium was difficult to test. Originally, this bacterium was considered to reside exclusively in, and be a potential pathogen of, the area of the reproductive and urinary organs – the genitourinary tract.







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