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Patient Safety

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Medicine

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Case Western Reserve University, case school of engineering, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine

Filling Need for Fast and Accurate Assessment of Blood’s Ability to Clot

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Case Western Reserve University researchers have developed a portable sensor that can assess the clotting ability of a person’s blood 95 times faster than current methods—using only a single drop of blood.

Medicine

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Ut Southwestern, Cardiac Arrest, epinephrine injection

Adrenaline Rush: Delaying Epinephrine Shots After Cardiac Arrest Cuts Survival Rates

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Hospitals in which the administration of epinephrine to patients whose hearts have stopped is delayed beyond five minutes have significantly lower survival rates of those patients, a new study led by a cardiologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center finds.

Medicine

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Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Retention, Job Satisfaction, ICU, Critical Care, University of Maryland Medical Center, APRN

AACN Journal Article Outlines How to Integrate New Nurse Practitioners into Critical Care

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An article in Critical Care Nurse describes key strategic planning for new roles, training programs and other strategies that have resulted in successful nurse practitioners in all 10 ICUs at the University of Maryland Medical Center. UMMC’s strategic approach has decreased turnover and increased overall job satisfaction scores among NPs.

Medicine

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Cochlear Implant

Patient's Hearing Is Restored Thanks to Cochlear Implant at Loyola

Julia Conkin's hearing was so poor she needed to use sign language to communicate. Then she received a cochlear implant at Loyola Medicine, and the results were spectacular. "I could hear things I had not heard for years, like music and conversations at gatherings,” she said. “It was beautiful to hear other people.”

Medicine

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Advance Directives, Kidney Failure

Kidney Failure Patients’ Advance Directives Often Inadequately Address End-of-Life Decisions Related to Dialysis

• In a recent analysis, approximately half of dialysis patients had advance directives, but only 3% specifically addressed dialysis management at the end of life. • Patients were far more likely to address other end-of-life interventions than dialysis in their advance directives.

Medicine

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Diabetes & Endocrinology, Diabetes, Hypoglycemia, Mortality, hospital mortality, Endocrine Society, Quality & Patient Safety, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism , Diabetes Awareness Month

Low Blood Glucose Levels in Hospitalized Patients Linked to Increased Mortality Risk

In hospitalized patients, low blood sugar—also known as hypoglycemia—is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality risk, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Medicine

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Medical Errors, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Curriculum, Healthcare Quality, Patient Safety, Donna Woods

How to Prevent 440,000 Yearly Deaths Due to Medical Errors

The first Ph.D. program in health care quality and patient safety program in the country -- at Northwestern Medicine -- aims to prevent the annual 440,000 deaths from medical errors in the United States through innovative curriculum.

Medicine

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Rheumatology practices , Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act , MACRA, ACR annual meeting, Merit-Based Incentive Payment System, MIPS, alternative payment models, APMs, Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness , rise, Quality Measures, Osteoporosis, gout, Rheumatology, Registry

Rheumatology Practices Differ Widely on Meeting Quality Measures for Patient Care, Especially in Osteoporosis and Gout

Rheumatology practices in the United States aren’t always meeting key quality measures for patient care that may affect them as new physician reimbursement laws go into effect in the next year, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.

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NewYork-Presbyterian/Westchester Division Earns Planetree Honor for Patient-Centered Care

NewYork-Presbyterian/Westchester has received the 2016 Planetree Distinction Award for Leadership and Innovation in Patient-Centered Care.

Medicine

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Bacteria, Infection, Medical Device, Slips, low adhesive medical device, slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces, Bacterial Infections, medical applications, Staphylococcus Aureus, antibiotic resisistance, Microorganisms

Bacteria Can’t Get a Grip on Self-Healing, Slippery Surface

Implanted medical devices like catheters, surgical mesh and dialysis systems are ideal surfaces on which bacteria can colonize and form hard-to-kill sheets called biofilms. Known as biofouling, this contamination of devices is responsible for more than half of the 1.7 million hospital-acquired infections in the United States each year.

Medicine

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Patient Access, adaptive pathways

ISPOR 19th Annual European Congress Issue Panel Explores Issue of Adaptive Pathways and Patient Access

The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) held a session this afternoon entitled, "Adaptive Pathways and Patient Access: Pushing Payer Boundaries or Facilitating New Payment Models?" at the Society’s 19th Annual European Congress in Vienna, Austria.

Medicine

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Moving Toward a Gold Standard in Patient Handoff Protocols

A deep dive into the research on standardized handoff protocols reveals processes that result in the best outcomes for patients, caregivers, and health-care organizations.

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Patient Care, Pediatric Cancer Research, Patient Care Management, Patient Safety

Patient Safety Benefits When Hospitals Provide Feedback to Staff Who Report Errors

A St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital analysis suggests that to improve patient safety, hospitals should focus on providing feedback to staff about changes resulting from past staff reports of safety-related events.

Medicine

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University of Chicago Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Leapfrog group, Hospital Safety, Patient Safety, Kenneth Polonsky

UChicago Medicine Earns 10th Straight 'A' for Hospital Safety Rating

The University of Chicago Medicine earned its 10th consecutive straight "A" rating in hospital safety, according to a new report card released Monday by a prominent industry watchdog.

Medicine

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Oncology, Survivorship, Survivorship Care

Getting Survivorship Care Planning Off the Page and Into Practice

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Jennifer Klemp, PhD, MPH, director of cancer survivorship and an associate professor at The University of Kansas Cancer Center, is interviewed by Oncology Nursing News. In this interview, Klemp offers insights on some of the critical issues that clinicians face, among them: how to deliver optimal survivorship care, what ingredients go into the plan, how to measure progress, and how is this care reimbursed.

Medicine

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Patient Safety and Quality

A Perfect 10 for Safety

Rush University Medical Center has received its 10th consecutive "A" grade for safety from the Leapfrog Group, making it one of only 72 hospitals in the country to receive an A grade, the highest possible, each time the Leapfrog Group has rated hospitals.

Medicine

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Stent, Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiology

Study Confirms Polymer-Free Drug-Coated Stents Safer and More Effective Than Bare-Metal Stents in Patients at High Risk for Bleeding Treated with One Month of Dapt

The two-year results from LEADERS FREE, the first randomized clinical trial dedicated to high bleeding risk patients treated with one month of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), found that a polymer-free drug-coated stent (DCS) remained both significantly safer and more effective than the comparator bare-metal stent (BMS) used in the trial.

Medicine

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Stent, Coronary Artery Disease, Medicine, Cardiology

Very Thin-Strut Biodegradable Polymer Everolimus-Eluting and Sirolimus-Eluting Stents Shown to Be Non-Inferior to Durable Polymer Zotarolimus-Eluting Stents in All-Comers with Coronary Artery Disease

Results of a large-scale, multicenter study found that treatment with two thin-strut drug-eluting stents were both non-inferior to a durable polymer drug-eluting stent and showed favorable clinical outcomes at one year in treating an all-comers population with a high proportion of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

Medicine

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American College Of Surgeons, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, ACS NSQIP, Meritorious Outcomes, surgical quality, Surgical Patient Care

60 ACS NSQIP® Participating Hospitals Recognized for Achieving Meritorious Outcomes for Surgical Patient Care

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) has recognized 60 of 603 hospitals participating in the adult program for achieving meritorious outcomes for surgical patient care in 2015.

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epi-pen

Epipen Sticker Shock? No Problem. We’Ll Make Our Own.

Concerned about both safety and the skyrocketing costs of EpiPen, University of Utah Health Care (UUHC) nurses were already searching for solutions before the media storm hit. At a summer meeting, the group voted to ditch the EpiPen and instead create “epi-kits” that could be used to reverse deadly allergic reactions. With the EpiPen controversy still raging, the switch to “epi-kits” at UUHC comes at just the right time. The kits — which, at $3.50 each, cost less than 1 percent of the EpiPen’s price — are set to roll out to University hospitals and clinics starting on Nov. 1.







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