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Many Patients with Gout Do Not Receive Recommended Treatment

Among patients in England with gout, only a minority of those with indications to receive urate-lowering therapy were treated according to guideline recommendations, according to a study in the December 24/31 issue of JAMA.

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Perioperative Surgical Home Improves Quality, Reduces Health Care Costs, Large Review Finds

The Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) model consistently and significantly improves quality of care for patients and reduces health care costs, reports a first-of-its-kind, large-scale literature review of the PSH in the United States and abroad. The review, published online this month in Milbank Quarterly, provides further evidence to support the benefits, and encourage the adoption, of the PSH model.

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Faster, Coordinated Response Could Help More Patients Survive Heart Attacks in New York City, Across Nation

A faster, coordinated emergency response in collaboration with hospital cardiac catheterization laboratories in each U.S. region, including New York City, is associated with improving patient survival from a heart attack caused by a sudden, completely blocked artery called an ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014.

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Revolutionary Software Helping Overhaul Inefficient Healthcare Delivery, Improve Patient Safety and Outcomes

Amid rising healthcare expenditures, an innovative software program called TimeCaT is helping hospitals identify where inefficiencies in workflow are impacting both the quality of patient care and the bottom line.

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Behavioral Flexibility Impaired After Exposure to Oxycodone

Brief usage of the painkiller oxycodone may impair behavioral flexibility even after that use ends, suggesting impaired decision-making as an enduring consequence of exposure, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 17 in the journal Learning and Memory.

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Aspirin or Blood Pressure Medication Before and After Surgery Does Not Reduce Risk of AKI

In patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, neither aspirin nor clonidine (a medication primarily used to treat high blood pressure) taken before and after surgery reduced the risk of acute kidney injury, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American Society of Nephrology’s annual Kidney Week meeting.

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Premature Infants Are Exposed to Unsafe Levels of Chemical in Medical Products Used to Save Their Lives

Hospitalized premature infants are exposed to unsafe levels of a chemical found in numerous medical products used to treat them, raising questions about whether critically ill newborns may be adversely affected by equipment designed to help save their lives.

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Controversial Medication Has Benefits for Breastfeeding

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A controversial medication used by breastfeeding women should not be restricted because of the benefits it offers mothers and their babies, according to researchers at the University of Adelaide.

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Hospital Workers Wash Hands Less Frequently Toward End of Shift, Study Finds

Hospital workers who deal directly with patients wash their hands less frequently as their workday progresses, probably because the demands of the job deplete the mental reserves they need to follow rules, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Project Reduces “Alarm Fatigue” in Hospitals by 80 Percent

The sound of monitor alarms in hospitals can save patients’ lives, but the frequency with which the monitors go off can also lead to “alarm fatigue,” in which caregivers become desensitized to the ubiquitous beeping.

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