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Medicine

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antibiotic resisistance, antibiotic resistant drugs, Sepsis, Viral Infection, NHS

New Research Into Antibiotic Treatment for Killer Sepsis

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University of Warwick expertise is contributing to a world-first £1.5million study aiming to tackle one of the biggest public health threats we face – antibiotic resistance.

Medicine

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Cancer, Dr. Jose Pulido, Dr. Lauren Dalvin, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Melanoma, Neurosciences, Rochester Epidemiology Project, Medical Research

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Jul-2017 12:05 AM EDT

Medicine

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Catheter, Bloodstream Infections

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Jun-2017 5:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Immunotherapy, Patient Support, Patient Access, Clinical Trials, Cancer

Cancer Patients and Caregivers Join Immunotherapy Experts in Five U.S. Cities to Discuss Latest Cancer Treatment Breakthroughs and Immunotherapy Clinical Trials

CRI's 2017 Immunotherapy Patient Summit Series will travel to five U.S. cities to provide free educational programming designed for cancer patients and caregivers who are seeking to learn more about cancer immunotherapy and clinical trials.

Medicine

Business

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Endocrine Society, MedPage Today, Reading Room, Clinical Care, Patient Care

Endocrine Society Partners with MedPage Today to Deliver Unique Content Offering

Building on their longtime collaboration, MedPage Today and the Endocrine Society are pleased to announce the official launch of the Endocrine Society Reading Room. This unique offering includes content from the Endocrine Society's top-ranked journals as well as exclusive, original content from MedPage Today's team of award-winning journalists, written specifically for the Reading Room. This new venture also provides expert critiques written by a member of the Endocrine Society that accompanies each article.

Medicine

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State Medical Licensing Boards’ Practices May Hurt Physician Mental Health

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A new study found state medical boards ask physicians much more extensive and intrusive questions about mental health conditions than for physical health conditions — without improving patient safety.

Medicine

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ASHP, choosing wisely campaign, Medication Safety, ABIM Foundation, Consumer Reports, Pharmacy, paul abramowitz, Choosing Wisely , Advocacy, medication use, Patient Safety

ASHP Contributes Medication-Use Recommendations to Choosing Wisely Campaign

ASHP (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists) released five recommendations to facilitate optimal medication use for patients in acute and ambulatory care settings as part of the Choosing Wisely® campaign.

Medicine

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Rehabilitation, rehabilitation nursing, Rehabilitation Medicine, Amputee, PTSD patients, Amputation

From Disability to New Ability: An Interview with Mountain Climber and Amputee Chad Jukes

Retired Staff Sergeant, Amputee and Mountain Climber Chad Jukes talks with Rehabilitation Nursing Journal Editor-In-Chief and Rehab Nurse Dr. Kristen Mauk.

Medicine

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Cancer, Research, Patient Care, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ut Southwestern

Strategy of Hope: Patients Try Creative Approaches to Fight Brain Cancer

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Dennis Kothmann jots several numbers on a clipboard then pauses, his pen frozen on the last figure. His eyebrows furrow and he quietly mouths a calculation.

Medicine

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Health, Epidemiology

New Study Design Holds Promise for Drug Safety Research

As the pace of drug approvals accelerates and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) faces potential budget cuts, a new research design from Perelman School of Medicine scientists offers a new way to successfully assess safety of newly approved drugs, as well as drugs that have been on the market for a long time and have had a marked rise in their use. The study, published in the July issue of the journal Epidemiology, offers benefits over typically used randomized clinical trials, as such studies are often too small to identify rare side effects or may be performed in a group of patients who do not take other types of medications or have other conditions that could skew the drug's effect in a broader group following approval. Also first-in-class drugs may not have an applicable comparator drug, and traditional follow-up studies may give inaccurate results if those who take a new drug are different from those who took the comparator drug.







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