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Winning Star Trek Tricorder Device to Be Presented to Experts at the 69th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting

Press can register here to livestream this special session through Newswise Live on Monday, July 31 at 7:30 PM EDT. The winner of the Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE competition will present DxtER—a real-life tricorder—at the 69th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in San Diego. This special session will be the first time that the device is presented to researchers at a U.S. scientific conference.

Medicine

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ISPOR Task Force Report, rare disease, Rare Diseases, Clinical Trials, patient voice, outcome assessment, patient reported outcomes, observer-reported outcome

ISPOR Releases Recommendations for Outcome Assessment in Rare Disease Clinical Trials

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ISPOR announced today the publication of a new Task Force Report, "Patient-Reported Outcome and Observer-Reported Outcome Assessment in Rare Disease Clinical Trials: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force," in the July/August 2017 issue of Value in Health.

Medicine

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Medicine And Health, Cancer

Young Adult Cancer Survivors Struggle to Get Back to Normal

Cancer survivors often talk about wanting to get back to normal, but a new study indicates many young adults who survived the disease struggle with attaining this goal two years after their initial diagnosis.

Medicine

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Surgery Fixed This 95-year-old’s Life-Threatening Aortic Aneurysm

According to Todd Russell, MD, FACS, a ProMedica Physician with Jobst Vascular Institute, Rita’s was a silent but very serious risk. He explained, “Her abdominal aortic aneurysm was asymptomatic [showing no symptoms], it was an enlargement of her artery and because it was enlarging significantly, there was a risk the artery wall could become very weak and rupture.”

Medicine

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OpenNotes, open notes, health transformation, health information technolgy, Patient Engagement, Patient Safety

What Patients Value About Access to Their Visit Notes

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New findings from researchers at OpenNotes and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center shed light on what patients value about having access to their visit notes and being invited to participate more actively in the safety of their care.

Medicine

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Information Technology, Patient Care, clinical integration, American Hospital Association, Most Wired Survey

UNC Health Care Honored as “Most Wired Advanced” by American Hospital Association

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UNC Health Care is one of only 27 systems in the United States to be recognized as a “Most Wired Advanced” health system by the American Hospital Association (AHA) for its use of information technology to improve patient care and clinical integration.

Medicine

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Anesthesiology, Medical Emergency, Simulation, Training

Research Shows Areas for Improvement During Medical Emergencies Training

The study — published this week in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) — identified opportunities to improve the emergency event management performance of all clinicians, according to the principal investigator and lead author, Matthew Weinger, M.D., professor of Anesthesiology, Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC).

Medicine

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Kidney Disease, Exercise, Dialysis, Chronic Kidney Disease, CKD, Aerobic Exercise

Aerobic Exercise Found Safe for Non-Dialysis Kidney Disease Patients

A new study finds that moderate exercise does not impair kidney function in some people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study—the first to analyze the effects of exercise on kidney disease that does not require dialysis—is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology.

Medicine

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Mark Bicket, per, Drugs, Opiod

Researchers Find Handwritten Opioid Prescriptions Are More Prone to Mistakes

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In a small study of opioid prescriptions filled at a Johns Hopkins Medicine outpatient pharmacy, researchers found that handwritten orders for the drugs contribute heavily to a trio of prescribing and processing errors in contrast to those created electronically.

Medicine

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Cancer, Dr. Jose Pulido, Dr. Lauren Dalvin, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Melanoma, Neurosciences, Rochester Epidemiology Project, Medical Research

People with Parkinson’s Should Be Monitored for Melanoma, and Vice Versa, Mayo Study Finds

People with the movement disorder Parkinson’s disease have a much higher risk of the skin cancer melanoma, and vice versa, a Mayo Clinic study finds. While further research is needed into the connection, physicians treating one disease should be vigilant for signs of the other and counsel those patients about risk, the authors say. The findings are published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.







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