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Do Children with Tourette Syndrome Have an Advantage at Language?

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Children with Tourette syndrome may process aspects of language faster than other children, a new study shows

Science

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Hearing, Hearing Aids, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, NSF, National Science Foundation, Grant, SUNY, Sensors, Sensor Technology, te, Tech, Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, electrical storage, Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid, microphones

New Research Could Help Build Better Hearing AIDS

Scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York want to improve sensor technology critical to billions of devices made every year. With a three-year, $359,958 grant from the National Science Foundation, they will start by making a high-performance sensor and applying it to hearing aids.

Medicine

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UNC Hearing Loss Experts Lead Clinical Trials of FDA-Approved Hearing Implant

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For patients whose hearing is considered “too good” for traditional cochlear implants, but whose hearing loss is too advanced to benefit from hearing aids, there hasn’t been a device to meet their needs.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Cognitive Sciences, Iconicity, Language evolution, Linguistics, Sound Symbolism

A Nose by Any Other Name Would Sound the Same, Study Finds

In a study that shatters a cornerstone concept in linguistics, an analysis of nearly two-thirds of the world’s languages shows that humans tend to use the same sounds for common objects and ideas, no matter what language they’re speaking.

Medicine

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hidden hearing loss, auditory nerve, Audiology, Tinnitus, hyperacusis, Otology, Hearing

Researchers Find Evidence of “Hidden Hearing Loss” in College-Age Human Subjects

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, linked symptoms of difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments with evidence of cochlear synaptopathy, a condition known as “hidden hearing loss,” in college-age human subjects with normal hearing sensitivity.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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DEAF, KODA, Haiti, Civic Engagement, Community Service, Volunteer

Salisbury University Junior Assists Deaf Children in Haiti

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For Salisbury University business management and information systems major Darrin Reedy, however, this summer was a time to make a difference in the lives of people he had never met in a country where he never dreamed he would travel. The junior spent two and a half weeks teaching deaf children and assisting residents in the small village of Lévêque, Haiti.

Medicine

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Speech Disorder, Speech Disorders, Apraxia, Sign Language

Sign Language May Be Helpful for Children with Rare Speech Disorder

Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Presidential Candidates, Campaign Language, election 2016

Calm or Fiery? Study Says Candidate Language Should Match the Times

Potential voters who see the nation as being in dire economic straits view a presidential candidate as more “presidential” when he or she uses high-intensity, emotional language, a new study suggests.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Southern, Accent, southern accent, Linguistics, speech and language, Speech

What Makes Southerners Sound Southern?

Linguistic researchers will be isolating and identifying the specific variations in speech that make Southerners sound Southern.

Science

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Language, Linguistic, Speech, perception and awareness, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Maternal Language Shapes Infants' Cry Melodies

Tonal languages sound rather strange to European ears: in contrast to German, French or English, their meaning is also determined by the pitch at which syllables or words are pronounced. A seemingly identical sound can mean completely different things - depending on whether it is pronounced with high pitch, low pitch or a specific pitch fluctuation.

Life

Arts and Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Education

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Copying, Phobias, Language, Linguistic, Speech, Memory & Cognitive Processes, Normalcy, Personality, Attitude, Social Behavioral Sciences

Unlocking the Languages of Autistic Children in Families

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Researchers at the University of Kent are arguing that creativity and intermedial languages can be used as a bridge to communicate with autistic children.

Science

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middle ear, Hearing Aid, Hearing Loss, Engineering

Sunil Puria, Ph.D., Leading Hearing Researcher, Named Amelia Peabody Scientist at Mass. Eye and Ear

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Sunil Puria, Ph.D., recently joined Massachusetts Eye and Ear as the second Amelia Peabody Scientist in the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories. Dr. Puria, an electrical engineer who trained as a postdoctoral researcher at Mass. Eye and Ear from 1991 to 1997, brings more than 20 years of experience in mathematical modeling and hearing research in both academia and industry settings back to Mass. Eye and Ear, where he will direct the OtoBiomechanics Group.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthroplogy, Evolution, Language, Linguistics, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Voice Control in Orangutan Gives Clues to Early Human Speech

An adolescent orangutan called Rocky could provide the key to understanding how speech in humans evolved from the time of the ancestral great apes, according to new research.

Medicine

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Otolarnygology, Deafness, Literacy, Research, Audiology, Education, Bilingual, Hearing, Children, Reading, Writing

Innovative USC Program Helps Develop Literacy for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children from Bilingual Homes

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USC program combines expertise of education experts, speech language pathologists and audiologists to improve bilingual literacy and writing skills among children who are hard of hearing.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Yiddish, Language Studies, Jewish diaspora, Jewish Community, Ashkenazi Jews, Cultural Studies

Yiddish Language Courses Thriving at Binghamton University

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Yiddish is a language spoken by few but remembered by many. The language is alive and well on many U.S. campuses--including Binghamton University in New York, where Yiddish classes, available since the 1980s, are seeing growth in enrollment and are consistently full to capacity.

Medicine

Life

Arts and Humanities

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UTHealth

UT Student Scientists Excel in Elevator Speech Contest

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Students at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston sharpened their communication skills in an elevator speech contest.

Science

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Social Interaction, Video Game, Language, Computer Science

Language-Learning Games Have Greater Impact if You Up the Gamers

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Games are usually more fun when you play with other people, but if you’re playing an educational game, interacting with other players may help you learn more, according to Cornell University research. Using a language-learning game called “Crystallize,” created by Cornell computer science faculty and students, researchers found that when players are required to work together they learn more words – and enjoy the game more.

Science

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Voice, Vocal Cord, Larynx, Physiology, Singing

Pitch Range Produced by Vocal Cords

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Vocal cords are able to produce a wide range of sound frequencies because of the larynx’s ability to stretch vocal cords and the cords’ molecular composition.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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'Now-or-Never Bottleneck' Explains Language Acquisition

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Parent Child Communication, Immigrant Families, Language Barriers

Bad Behavior May Not Be a Result of Bad Parenting, but a Lack of Common Language

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Most parents will admit that talking with a teenage child can be difficult. It's even more challenging when they don’t speak the same language – a reality for a growing number of immigrant families. New research suggests this language barrier can have negative consequences.







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