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Science

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Monkey, University of Vienna, Tecumseh Fitch, Department of Cognitive Biology, vocal anatomy, Vocalizations, Asif Ghazanfar, Princeton University, vocal tract, speechready

Why Can't Monkeys Speak? Vocal Anatomy Is Not the Problem

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Monkeys and apes are unable to learn new vocalizations, and for decades it has been widely believed that this inability results from limitations of their vocal anatomy: larynx, tongue and lips. But an international team of scientists, led by Tecumseh Fitch at the University of Vienna and Asif Ghazanfar at Princeton University, has now looked inside monkeys' vocal tracts with x-rays, and found them to be much more flexible than thought before. The study indicates that the limitations that keep nonhuman primates from speaking are in their brains, rather than their vocal anatomy.

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Yale Linguists Explore the Evolution of Color in New Study

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The naming of colors has long been a topic of interest in the study of human culture and cognition — revealing the link between perception, language, and the categorization of the natural world. A major question in the study of both anthropology and cognitive science is why the world’s languages show recurrent similarities in color naming. Linguists at Yale tracked the evolution of color terms across a large language tree in Australia in order to trace the history of these systems.

Science

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 12-Dec-2016 9:00 AM EST

Science

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Learning, infant learning, Language acquisition, Babies, Parenting, Visual Attention, First Words, Psychology, psychological and brain sciences, early language learning, Speech Disorders, Autism

Babies' First Words Can Be Predicted Based on Visual Attention, IU Study Finds

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Indiana University psychologists have shown that a baby's most likely first words are based upon their visual experience, laying the foundation for a new theory of infant language learning. The study appears in the journal of the Royal Society Philosophical Transactions B.

Science

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Voice, vocal quality, voice recognition, Acoustics, Linguistics, vocal characteristics, Patricia Keating, Jody Kreiman, UCLA, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

What Makes Your Voice Yours?

What are the characteristics of the way you say, “hello,” (or anything else for that matter) that makes you recognizable over the phone? Despite the increasing amount of literature on personal voice quality, very little is actually known about how to characterize the sound of an individual speaker. Two researchers from UCLA in Los Angeles, California, Patricia Keating and Jody Kreiman, are joining forces to apply acoustics tools to their linguistics research, investigating this question.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Children, Anger, Acoustics, Listening, Speech, emotional speech, emotional cues, emotional environment, Peter Moriarty, Michelle Vigeant, Pamela Cole , Pennsylvania State University, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

How Do Children Hear Anger?

Even if they don’t understand the words, infants react to the way their mother speaks and the emotions conveyed through speech. What exactly they react to and how has yet to be fully deciphered, but could have significant impact on a child’s development. Researchers in acoustics and psychology teamed up to better define and study this impact.

Science

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voice appeal, vocal appeal, vocal attractiveness, consonant, Linguistics, Acoustics, Emily Blamire , University Of Toronto, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Voice Appeal - New Research Suggests That Men and Women Perceive Consonants Differently.

In a study to be presented during the 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the 5th Joint Meeting with Acoustical Society of Japan, a Canadian researcher has new data about the vocal attractiveness of consonants. Vowels are already well studied and there are several acoustic cues intrinsic to vowels -- such as pitch -- that effect listeners’ judgments of attractiveness. According to the researchers, consonants are different.

Medicine

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Stuttering, Speech Production, language-based brain circuits

Stuttering Related to Brain Circuits That Control Speech Production

Researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have conducted the first study of its kind, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to look at brain regions in both adults and children who stutter.

Life

Education

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Bilingual, bilingual education, Bilingualism, English As A Second Language, English Language Learners, Biliteracy, Immigrant, Immigrant Children, immigrant communities

Renowned Scholar Patricia Gándara to Discuss English Language Learners, Bilingual Education at Brooklyn Event on November 30

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Dr. Patricia Gándara, a leading researcher on English language learners and bilingual education, will deliver a lecture titled “Educating Immigrant Students and Emergent Bilinguals” as part of the American Educational Research Association’s Centennial Lecture Series. The event is open to the public.

Science

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ASA 172nd Meeting and 5th Joint Meeting with the Acoustical Society of Japan, Acoustics, speech recognition, Sound, speech rate

Save the Date: Major Acoustics Meeting in Honolulu November 28- December 2, 2016

The 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) will be held November 28- December 2, 2016, at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort. The location was picked with all travelers in mind, as it is also the 5th Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and Acoustical Society of Japan. Over 2,050 abstracts were submitted for the meeting on sound and its applications in physics, engineering, medicine, linguistics and more. Reporters are invited to attend in person for free.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Free Speech, Free Speech Week, First Amendment, Westboro Baptist Church, student speech, Communication

National Communication Association Reaffirms Credos and Releases Publication Featuring Free Speech

NCA reaffirms its commitment to the teaching, research, and other professional activities that fuel best communication practices and that support ongoing interpretations of free speech, whether legal, historic, artistic, or political.

Medicine

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Physiology, Neurophysiology, Hearing Loss, speech and language

Ability to Process Speech Declines with Age

Researchers have found clues to the causes of age-related hearing loss. The ability to track and understand speech in both quiet and noisy environments deteriorates due in part to speech processing declines in both the midbrain and cortex in older adults.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Do Children with Tourette Syndrome Have an Advantage at Language?

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Children with Tourette syndrome may process aspects of language faster than other children, a new study shows

Science

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Hearing, Hearing Aids, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, NSF, National Science Foundation, Grant, SUNY, Sensors, Sensor Technology, te, Tech, Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, electrical storage, Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid, microphones

New Research Could Help Build Better Hearing Aids

Scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York want to improve sensor technology critical to billions of devices made every year. With a three-year, $359,958 grant from the National Science Foundation, they will start by making a high-performance sensor and applying it to hearing aids.

Medicine

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UNC Hearing Loss Experts Lead Clinical Trials of FDA-Approved Hearing Implant

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For patients whose hearing is considered “too good” for traditional cochlear implants, but whose hearing loss is too advanced to benefit from hearing aids, there hasn’t been a device to meet their needs.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Cognitive Sciences, Iconicity, Language evolution, Linguistics, Sound Symbolism

A Nose by Any Other Name Would Sound the Same, Study Finds

In a study that shatters a cornerstone concept in linguistics, an analysis of nearly two-thirds of the world’s languages shows that humans tend to use the same sounds for common objects and ideas, no matter what language they’re speaking.

Medicine

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hidden hearing loss, auditory nerve, Audiology, Tinnitus, hyperacusis, Otology, Hearing

Researchers Find Evidence of “Hidden Hearing Loss” in College-Age Human Subjects

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, linked symptoms of difficulty understanding speech in noisy environments with evidence of cochlear synaptopathy, a condition known as “hidden hearing loss,” in college-age human subjects with normal hearing sensitivity.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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DEAF, KODA, Haiti, Civic Engagement, Community Service, Volunteer

Salisbury University Junior Assists Deaf Children in Haiti

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For Salisbury University business management and information systems major Darrin Reedy, however, this summer was a time to make a difference in the lives of people he had never met in a country where he never dreamed he would travel. The junior spent two and a half weeks teaching deaf children and assisting residents in the small village of Lévêque, Haiti.

Medicine

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Speech Disorder, Speech Disorders, Apraxia, Sign Language

Sign Language May Be Helpful for Children with Rare Speech Disorder

Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Presidential Candidates, Campaign Language, election 2016

Calm or Fiery? Study Says Candidate Language Should Match the Times

Potential voters who see the nation as being in dire economic straits view a presidential candidate as more “presidential” when he or she uses high-intensity, emotional language, a new study suggests.







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