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What Does Music Mean? Sign Language May Offer an Answer, New Research Concludes

How do we detect the meaning of music? We may gain some insights by looking at an unlikely source, sign language, a newly released linguistic analysis concludes.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Self-talk , Reflection, Cardiovascular, Stress, Coping, Anxiety, Internal Dialogue, Stress Management, Social Psychology, Self Distancing, Language, Self Immersing

UB Research Shows How Pronouns Can Be Used to Build Confidence in Stressful Situations

A new study suggests that taking a “distanced perspective,” or seeing ourselves as though we were an outside observer, leads to a more confident and positive response to upcoming stressors than seeing the experience through our own eyes.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Language acquisition, Immigrants, Refugees, Global Academic Programs, Jesuit Education, English As A Second Language, Teaching English

More Than 50 Nations, 40 Languages Represented at Gonzaga University's 19th Summer Language Program

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SPOKANE, Wash. – Some 300 Spokane-area immigrant and refugee learners from preschool through age 80 representing over 50 countries and speaking more than 40 languages are taking part in Gonzaga University’s 19th annual Summer Language Program on campus.

Science

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Physics, Language, Mathematics

Physics of Bubbles Could Explain Language Patterns

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Language patterns could be predicted by simple laws of physics, a new study has found. Dr James Burridge from the University of Portsmouth has published a theory using ideas from physics to predict where and how dialects occur.

Medicine

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Otolarnygology, Laryngeal, Larynx, Otolaryngologist, Voice Box, Vocal Cord, Tracheostomy, Trachea, Esophagus

Man Undergoes Throat Reconstruction, Regains Voice After Vicious Horse Attack

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After extensive reconstruction of a crushed larynx caused by a savage horse attack, surgeons at Ben Taub Hospital still weren’t sure if Ivory Lindsey Sr. would ever speak again, much less regain the ability to swallow, drink or eat food.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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bilingual education, infants learning

Bilingual Babies: New Study Shows How Exposure to a Foreign Language Ignites Infants' Learning

A new study by the University of Washington, published July 17 in Mind, Brain, and Education, is among the first to investigate how babies can learn a second language outside of the home. The researchers sought to answer a fundamental question: Can babies be taught a second language if they don’t get foreign language exposure at home, and if so, what kind of foreign language exposure, and how much, is needed to spark that learning?

Science

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UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, Darren Lipomi, smart glove, sign language glove, virtual reality glove, American Sign Language, Virtual Reality, Center for Wearable Sensors, wearable devices, Robotics, stretchable electronics, gesture recognition, low power electronics, human machine interface

Low-Cost Smart Glove Translates American Sign Language Alphabet and Controls Virtual Objects

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smart glove that wirelessly translates the American Sign Language alphabet into text and controls a virtual hand to mimic sign language gestures. The device, which engineers call “The Language of Glove,” was built for less than $100 using stretchable and printable electronics that are inexpensive, commercially available and easy to assemble.

Science

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Neurons, vocal learning, learning vocalizations, speech and language, Ut Southwestern

Researchers ID Network of Neurons Crucial for Vocal Learning

Researchers have identified a network of neurons that plays a vital role in learning vocalizations by aiding communication between motor and auditory regions of the brain.

Medicine

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tongue twisters, ankyloglossia, speech impaired

Tongue Tied: Signs, Symptoms and Whether to Clip

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Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. This popular pre-school limerick is sure to get you to slip a time or two. Getting tongue-tied is common when you’re talking faster than your brain is thinking. However, did you know there is another condition that shares the name?

Science

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Kinesthetic, language analysis, Learning and Development

University of Rhode Island Pioneers Research Into Movement, Learning, Language

Kinesthetic classrooms are not new, but the URI project is breaking new ground by measuring language patterns and usage in the context of movement. No other school is studying a kinesthetic classroom in a controlled manner, and no other school is looking at connections between movement, language and being on task, the researchers said.







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