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Who Will Develop Psychosis? Automated Speech Analysis May Have the Answer

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An automated speech analysis program correctly differentiated between at-risk young people who developed psychosis over a two-and-a-half year period and those who did not. In a proof-of-principle study, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center found that the computerized analysis provided a more accurate classification than clinical ratings.

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What Clinicians Need to Know about Bilingual Development in Children

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Bilingual children pose unique challenges for clinicians, and, until recently, there was little research on young bilinguals to guide clinical practice. A researcher at Florida Atlantic University provides important insight for clinicians.

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Speech Language Pathologists and Athletic Trainers at Ithaca College Work Together to Get Athletes Enough Air

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When an athlete tries to breathe deep and struggles to get air, their performance suffers and stress takes over. Such a common symptom is easily misdiagnosed, but could signal a physical issue that many sports health care professionals may be unaware of. Luckily, an unlikely pair of medical professionals at Ithaca College are teaming up to help athletes recover from this troublesome condition.

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How to Talk Like a Democrat or Republican: Language Divide Between U.S. Political Parties Reaches Historic High

A new study finds that American political speech has become more polarized across party lines over time, with a clear trend break around 1980, and that current levels are unprecedented.

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Hybrid Cochlear Implants for Common Form of Hearing Loss May Benefit Millions

People with a common form of hearing loss not helped by hearing aids achieved significant and sometimes profound improvements in their hearing and understanding of speech with hybrid cochlear implant devices, according to a new multicenter study led by specialists at NYU Langone Medical Center.

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Movement Tracking Technology Sheds Light on Different Speech Disorders in Children

Facial motion capture – the same technology used to develop realistic computer graphics in video games and movies – has been used to identify differences between children with childhood apraxia of speech and those with other types of speech disorders, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

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Bilinguals of Two Spoken Languages Have More Gray Matter Than Monolinguals

A new study suggests people who speak two languages have more gray matter in the executive control region of the brain.

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Syllables That Oscillate in Neuronal Circuits

Speech, emitted or received, produces an electrical activity in neurons that neuroscientists measure in the form of «cortical oscillations». To understand speech, as for other cognitive or sensory processes, the brain breaks down the information it receives to integrate it and give it a coherent meaning. But researchers could not confirm whether oscillations were signs of neuronal activity, or whether these oscillations played an active role in speech processing. Professor Anne-Lise Giraud and her team at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva (UNIGE) reached such conclusions after having created a computerized model of neuronal microcircuits, which highlights the crucial role of neuronal oscillations to decode spoken language, independently of speakers’ pace or accent.

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Autism and Rare Childhood Speech Disorder Often Coincide

Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

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All Sounds Made Equal in Melancholy

Psychoacoustics identifies five basic types of emotional speech: angry, fearful, happy, sad and neutral. In order to fully understand what’s happening with speech perception, a research team at the University of Texas at Austin studied how depressed individuals perceive these different kinds of emotional speech in multi-tonal environments. They will present their findings at the 169th ASA meeting, held this week in Pittsburgh.