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Brit Accents Vex U.S. Hearing-Impaired Elderly

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Older Americans with some hearing loss shouldn’t feel alone if they have trouble understanding British TV sagas like “Downton Abbey.” A small study from the University of Utah suggests hearing-impaired senior citizens have more trouble than young people comprehending British accents when there is background noise.

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Lung Function May Affect Vocal Health for Women

Vocal fatigue is a common complaint among teachers and one of the most debilitating conditions that can lead to vocal damage. The typical symptoms include hoarseness, vocal tiredness, muscle pains and lost or cracked notes. However, the actual physiological mechanism of vocal fatigue is still being explored. Now, a group of researchers have found a potential link between pulmonary function and the symptoms of voice fatigue unique to women, the predominate population of teaching workforce.

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Great Apes Communicate Cooperatively

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Gestural communication in bonobos and chimpanzees shows turn-taking and clearly distinguishable communication styles.

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Language Myth Buster

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Women talk more than men, texting makes you dumb, sign language is pantomime. These are just a few of the myths Abby Kaplan, professor of linguistics at the University of Utah, debunks in her recently published book, “Women Talk More Than Men…And Other Myths about Language Explained.”

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Top Stories 5-17-2016

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Top Stories 5-16-2016

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Bilingual Babies Learn Languages Faster Than Monolingual Babies: NUS Study

A study led by Associate Professor Leher Singh, from the Department of Psychology at the National University of Singapore’s Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, suggested that learning two languages from the start helps children master the rules of each language faster.

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Top Stories 5-13-2016

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Top Stories 5-11-2016

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Brain Pattern Predicts How Fast an Adult Learns a New Language

New University of Washington research shows that a five-minute measurement of resting-state brain activity predicted how quickly adults learned a second language.

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Brain Pattern Predicts How Fast an Adult Learns a New Language

New University of Washington research shows that a five-minute measurement of resting-state brain activity predicted how quickly adults learned a second language.

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Top Stories 5-10-2016

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Pattern Learning Key to Children's Language Development

A new study reveals children's language development is a learnt skill and is intricately linked to their ability to recognise patterns in their environment.

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Children with Autism Learn New Words Much Like Others Do, Study Finds

A new study has found that children with autism are capable of learning new words the same way any child would—by following someone’s gaze as they name an object. They just take longer to pick up the skill.

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WSU Professor Ray Hull Co-Authors New Book 'the Art of Communication'

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Wichita State Communication Sciences and Disorders Professor Ray Hull has co-authored a new book, "The Art of Communication," with New York Times best-selling author Jim Stovall.

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Brain's 'Thesaurus' Mapped to Help Decode Inner Thoughts

What if a map of the brain could help us decode people's inner thoughts? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have taken a step in that direction by building a "semantic atlas" that shows in vivid colors and multiple dimensions how the human brain organizes language. The atlas identifies brain areas that respond to words that have similar meanings.

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First Small Molecule Targeted Therapy to Mitigate Hearing Loss in Usher Syndrome Type 3

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A new study published in Nature Chemical Biology reports the first small molecule targeted therapy for progressive hearing loss in a mouse model of USH3, an USH classified by progressive loss of hearing and vision starting in the first few decades of life along with variable balance disorder.

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Award to Fund Research on Brain-Computer Interface Control of Communication Devices

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University of Kansas neuroscientist Jonathan Brumberg has been awarded a $25,000 New Century Scholars Research Grant by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation to develop and test a brain-computer interface (BCI) that will directly control commercially available augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for individuals with profound speech and motor disorders

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Bring the Language Lab to the Classroom

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A new in-classroom laboratory approach by University of Saskatchewan (U of S) researchers Laureen McIntyre and Laurie Hellsten promises to provide a real-world look at assessment and teaching strategies for students with speech, language and learning difficulties.

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Mice with Genetic Defect for Human Stuttering Offer New Insight Into Speech Disorder

Mice that vocalize in a repetitive, halting pattern similar to human stuttering may provide insight into a condition that has perplexed scientists for centuries, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health. These mice, which carry a mutation in a gene associated with stuttering in humans, may help scientists understand the biological basis of the disorder, and potentially lead to treatments.