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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 7-Sep-2015 3:00 PM EDT

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Romantic Opportunities Appear to Influence Women’s Sexual Identities, But Not Men’s

Romantic opportunities appear to influence women’s sexual identities — but not men’s, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

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Unlike Boys, Girls Lose Friends for Having Sex, Gain Friends for Making Out

Early adolescent girls lose friends for having sex and gain friends for “making out,” while their male peers lose friends for “making out” and gain friends for having sex, finds a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

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Want A Better Relationship And A Better Sex Life? Men Should Take More Child Care Responsibilities, Study Finds

If men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by Georgia State University sociologists.

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Couples That Split Childcare Duties Have Higher Quality Relationships and Sex Lives

Heterosexual couples that split childcare duties have higher quality relationships and sex lives than those who don’t, according to new research.

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Polygamy and Alcohol Linked to Physical Abuse in African Marriages

African women in polygamous marriages or with alcoholic husbands have a significantly higher risk of being physically abused by their husbands than women in monogamous marriages or women whose husbands don’t abuse alcohol, new research shows.

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Unmarried Women: Politically Cohesive, More Concerned About Women’s Status Than Married Counterparts

Why do unmarried women tend to be more liberal and Democratic than their married counterparts? A key reason is because unmarried women — those who have never been married and those who are divorced — are more concerned about the status of women as a collective group, suggests a new study.

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Women More Likely Than Men to Initiate Divorces, But Not Non-Marital Breakups

Women are more likely than men to initiate divorces, but women and men are just as likely to end non-marital relationships, according to a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

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University of Utah Researcher: Republicans Have Happier Marriages Than Democrats

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A new study by University of Utah sociologist Nick Wolfinger and a colleague from the University of Virginia reveals that Republicans tend to be happier in their marriages than Democrats, and are less likely to be divorced. Wolfinger and W. Bradford Wilcox, a sociologist at the University of Virginia, published the study Monday in Family Studies: The Blog of the Institute for Family Studies. Titled “Red Families vs. Blue Families: Which are Happier?,” the findings add to an ongoing debate over which set of political ideals help to lead people to a happy life, said Wolfinger.

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How Common Is Sexting?

The practice of sexting may be more common than generally thought among adults. More than eight out of 10 people surveyed online admitted to sexting in the prior year, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association’s 123rd Annual Convention.

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Study: Women Hurt More by Breakups but Recover More Fully

Women experience more emotional pain following a breakup, but they also more fully recover, according to new research from Binghamton University.

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Abusive Men Put Female Partners at Greater Sexual Risk, Study Finds

New University of Washington research finds that men who were physically and sexually abusive to women were more likely than non-abusive men to engage in behaviors that exposed them and their partners to sexually transmitted infections.

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Frank Talk About Sex Key to Improving Americans’ Sexual Health, Says UAB Physician

In JAMA Viewpoint, Edward W. Hook III, M.D., says doctors and patients must be willing to talk about sex if we are to decrease the nation’s rate of sexually transmitted infections.

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Marriage Can Lead to Dramatic Reduction in Heavy Drinking in Young Adults

Research on alcohol-use disorders consistently shows problem drinking decreases as we age. Now, researchers collaborating between the University of Missouri and Arizona State University have found evidence that marriage can cause dramatic drinking reductions even among people with severe drinking problems. Scientists believe findings could help improve clinical efforts to help these people, inform public health policy changes and lead to more targeted interventions for young adult problem drinkers.

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Genetic Tug of War in the Brain Influences Behavior

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report that a nuanced, targeted version of parental control over gene expression, is the method of choice over classic genomic imprinting. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred.

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NUS Team Discovers Novel Way of Protecting Male Reproductive Cells and Hails New Approach to Addressing Male Infertility

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), when applied exogenously, could protect testicular germ cells, which are male reproductive cells, against heat-induced injury, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. The findings may provide a new approach to treating male infertility.

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For Prostate Cancer Patients, Risk-Specific Therapies Now More the Norm

After decades of overtreatment for low-risk prostate cancer and inadequate management of its more aggressive forms, patients are now more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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Do Sex and Violence Sell? Maybe Not, Says New Study

Advertisers hoping to sway consumers might want to rethink running spots within media with violent or sexual themes, and might do better if the ads themselves have a G-rating, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. Instead, violent and sexual media content may impair advertising’s effectiveness and ultimately deter purchasing, the research found.

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​Sex and Violence May Not Really Sell Products

If there’s one thing advertisers think they know, it is that sex and violence sell. A new analysis, however, provides some of the best evidence to date that this widely accepted adage just isn’t true.

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Is Facebook Use Always Associated with Poorer Body Image and Risky Dieting?

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College women who are more emotionally invested in Facebook and have lots of Facebook friends are less concerned with body size and shape and less likely to engage in risky dieting behaviors. But that’s only if they aren’t using Facebook to compare their bodies to their friends’ bodies, according to the authors of a surprising new study at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.