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Genetic Tug of War in the Brain Influences Behavior

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report that a nuanced, targeted version of parental control over gene expression, is the method of choice over classic genomic imprinting. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred.

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NUS Team Discovers Novel Way of Protecting Male Reproductive Cells and Hails New Approach to Addressing Male Infertility

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine has demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen sulphide (H2S), when applied exogenously, could protect testicular germ cells, which are male reproductive cells, against heat-induced injury, which is one of the major causes of male infertility. The findings may provide a new approach to treating male infertility.

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For Prostate Cancer Patients, Risk-Specific Therapies Now More the Norm

After decades of overtreatment for low-risk prostate cancer and inadequate management of its more aggressive forms, patients are now more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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Do Sex and Violence Sell? Maybe Not, Says New Study

Advertisers hoping to sway consumers might want to rethink running spots within media with violent or sexual themes, and might do better if the ads themselves have a G-rating, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. Instead, violent and sexual media content may impair advertising’s effectiveness and ultimately deter purchasing, the research found.

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​Sex and Violence May Not Really Sell Products

If there’s one thing advertisers think they know, it is that sex and violence sell. A new analysis, however, provides some of the best evidence to date that this widely accepted adage just isn’t true.

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Is Facebook Use Always Associated with Poorer Body Image and Risky Dieting?

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College women who are more emotionally invested in Facebook and have lots of Facebook friends are less concerned with body size and shape and less likely to engage in risky dieting behaviors. But that’s only if they aren’t using Facebook to compare their bodies to their friends’ bodies, according to the authors of a surprising new study at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.

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Want to Avoid Divorce? Wait to Get Married — but Not Too Long—Says Utah Researcher

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A new analysis by University of Utah researcher Nick Wolfinger finds those who tie the knot after their early 30s are now more likely to divorce than those who marry in their late 20s. Past the early 30s, the odds of divorce increase by 5 percent per year of age at marriage—but it's not clear why.

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Exercise for Arthritis, Summer Weight Loss, ACA and Lower Drug Costs, and More Top Stories 8 July 2015

Other topics include autism research, biofuel sources, nutrition supplements, and more...

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Sociologists to Explore the Topic of Sexuality at Annual Meeting in Chicago, Aug. 22-25

More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Chicago this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to sexuality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association’s 110th Annual Meeting.

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Study Links Heartbeat to Female Libido

Sexual dysfunction in women can be linked to low resting heart rate variability, a finding that could help clinicians treat the condition, according to a study by psychologists from The University of Texas at Austin.