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Trauma

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Medicine

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Abuse, Hospital, Operating Room, Staff, Behavior

Abusive Behavior in the Operating Room?

A new study has found that healthcare workers in operating rooms are at a risk of witnessing physical and psychological abuse.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Brazil, Crack Cocaine, toxic stress, Brain Development In Children, Trauma, fMRI, Human Development, Drug Abuse, Domestic Abuse, Gang Violence, Child Protective Services

Texas Tech, Brazilian Researchers Examine Effects of Toxic Stress on Children’s Brain Development

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The study uses fMRI data to compare brain development between children who experience pervasive, continuing trauma and those with “normal” development.

Medicine

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Canner, Suicide, Emergency, Injury

Attempted Suicide Rates and Risk Groups Essentially Unchanged, New Study Shows

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Johns Hopkins investigators report that their analysis of a national database representing more than 1 billion emergency department visits shows that over a recent eight-year period, nothing much has changed in the rates of unsuccessful suicide attempts, or in the age, gender, seasonal timing or means used by those who tried to take their lives in the United States.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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fire, forest fire, Disaster, Resilience, Trauma

In Response to Great Smoky Mountain Fires: Virginia Tech Experts Can Talk About Post-Traumatic Stress, Impact on Tourism

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Medicine

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Concussion, mTBI, Rehabilitation, Treatment

After Concussion, Rest May Not Always Be the Best Medicine, Experts Say

Prescribed rest—both physical and mental—is the standard treatment for concussion. But a growing body of evidence suggests that a more active, targeted approach might provide better outcomes for some patients, reports a special article in the December issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Medicine

Channels:

concussion in sport, Athletes, Neuro, MRI, cortical thickness, Head Trauma

Study Shows Thinning of Brain Tissue Remains in College Football Players, Five Years After Play

A new study from researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine, suggests that even college-level athletes may be vulnerable to the effects of head trauma, and that even several years after graduation, college football players continue to show evidence of neuropathic brain changes.

Medicine

Channels:

sexual assult , Sexual Abuse, sexual assault survivors

Photography-Based Therapy Offers New Approach to Healing for Sexual Assault Survivors

One out of every six American women has experienced a sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault or rape in her lifetime, according to the National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While more than half of female survivors of rape report symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), previous research has found that not all survivors respond to traditional treatments for PTSD, causing their symptoms to resurface over time. Abigail Rolbiecki, Ph.D., a researcher at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, says that photovoice interventions, where participants express their thoughts and feelings through photos, combined with traditional PTSD treatments, could result in a more complete recovery for survivors of sexual assault.

Medicine

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distracted driving, Driving Behaviors, Driving Safety, Trauma Nursing

Program Helps Teens 'Get the Message' About Distracted Driving

A program to educate teens about distracted driving—including a tour of a hospital trauma center and testimony from a trauma survivor—can increase awareness of the dangers of texting, cell phone use, and other distractions while driving, reports a study in the Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Suicide, American Indian health, Suicide Prevention

Suicide Rates Drop Among Members of White Mountain Apache Tribe

Deaths by suicide among the White Mountain Apache in Arizona dropped by nearly 40 percent between 2006 and 2012 compared to the previous six-year period, new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the tribe reports.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Violence, Violence Against Children , South Africa, Save the Children South Africa, Emotional Abuse, Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Economy

Violence Against Children Costs South Africa $16.85 Billion Annually, Researchers Say

Violence against children in South Africa cost the nation R238.58 billion (equivalent to $16.85 billion in U.S. dollars) in 2015, Save the Children South Africa revealed at a press conference today (Nov. 23).

Medicine

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Helmet Laws, Motor Vehicle Crash Related Injuries, Trauma, Motorcycle, Emergency Medicine

Study: Double-Digit Rise in Head Injuries After Michigan Helmet Law Repeal

Fewer motorcycle riders who are involved in crashes across the state of Michigan are wearing a helmet, and the state’s trauma centers have seen a 14 percent increase in head injuries among motorcyclists, since the state’s partial repeal of its universal helmet law in April 2012, a new study finds.

Medicine

Science

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New Blood Test for Concussions Has 90 Percent Success Rate

Scientists from Children's Health Research Institute, a program of Lawson Health Research Institute, and Western University have developed a new blood test that identifies with greater than 90 per cent certainty whether or not an adolescent athlete has suffered a concussion.

Medicine

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Stressed-Out Rats Consume More Alcohol, Revealing Related Brain Chemistry

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Researchers found that rodents that had been exposed to stress had a weakened alcohol-induced dopamine response and voluntarily drank more alcohol compared to controls. The blunted dopamine signaling to ethanol arose due to changes in the circuitry in the ventral tegmental area, the heart of the brain's reward system.

Medicine

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McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Stem Cells, Charles S. Cox Jr, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, autologous stem cells, white brain matter, Inflammation, Department Of Defense, National Institutes of Health

UTHealth Research: Stem Cell Therapy Appears to Have TBI Treatment Effect

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Results of a cellular therapy clinical trial for traumatic brain injury (TBI) using a patient’s own stem cells showed that the therapy appears to dampen the body’s neuroinflammatory response to trauma and preserve brain tissue, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Medicine

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Military, military training, military trauma, Trauma, Trauma Care, trauma systems, Combat Blast Injury, amputated limbs, Critical Care, First Aid Techniques, Emergency Medicine, EMS, Penn Medicine

A Roadmap to Life After the Worst Injuries, in Times of War and Peace

The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have produced a horrific type of medical trauma known as the “dismounted complex blast injury” (DCBI), in which an improvised explosive device detonates beneath a soldier patrolling on foot, often leading to multiple-limb loss. Previously, these injuries were considered deadly, but today, new training techniques are helping to manage DCBIs, and in many cases stabilize these critically injured patients and restore many normal functions. The lessons learned will not only save lives on the battlefield in the future but also in civilian trauma centers today.

Medicine

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Surgery, Trauma, Colonoscopy, Biopsy, Medical Device, Bleeding, Hemostasis, Blood Thinner, Terrence Norchi, Arch Therapeutics, AC5 Surgical Hemostatic Device , AC5 Topical Hemostatic Device , AC5, Dermatology, Anticoagulant

Expert: Surgical Risks and Interventions in Development

Medicine

Channels:

Gunshot, gunshot wounds, Violence, traumatic brain injuries, TBI, GSW, Trauma, Trauma Care

Researchers Develop System to Classify Gunshot Wounds to the Head and Other Similar Injuries

– Every year, more than 32,000 Americans die from gunshot wounds. A significant proportion of these deaths involve head wounds. Despite this massive public health burden, researchers know little about the variables that determine whether a victim of these injuries will live or die. Now, for the first time ever, researchers have developed a system to help answer this question. The system has created a way to better understand the variables involved in survival from these wounds.

Medicine

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Uniformed Sevices University Of The Health Sciences, Uniformed Services University, USU, Usuhs, Military Medicine, Arthur Kellermann, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Trauma Care

Military Trauma ‘Lessons Learned’ Could Be Model for Shaping U.S. Health Care System

Tens of thousands of lives nationwide could be saved each year, and trauma-related deaths and disability could be reduced worldwide if the U.S. health care system embraces the military’s lessons learned in trauma care, according to a report in the (date) of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Medicine

Science

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Emergency Services, Trauma, Teen Drivers, Driving Safety, drinking and driving, Underage Drinking, distracted driving, DUI

Sobering Data Drives Home Need to Expand Teen DUI Prevention Program

In an effort to put the brakes on sobering statistics related to teenagers driving under the influence, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine will join forces with the San Diego Police Department (SDPD) to reduce alcohol-impaired driving among San Diego youth ages 15 to 20.

Medicine

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Trauma Care, Penn Medicine, Cardiac Arrest, Trauma, Clinical Research, Clinical Care Protocols, Informed Consent, Emergency Medicine, clinical trial enrollment

“Any Enrollment, Any Time”: Launch of Penn Acute Research Collaboration Supports Lifesaving Research

Life-threatening injuries – like those sustained in car crashes, falls, shootings – happen in a flash, and illnesses like cardiac arrests and strokes can strike without warning. These patients are often brought to a hospital outside of standard daytime hours of operation, or in conditions that prevent them and their families from being approached about participating in research exploring new treatments for these critical conditions. To address these gaps in research, on Thursday, Penn Medicine formally launched the Penn Acute Research Collaboration (PARC), a first-of-its-kind initiative to give a much needed shot of support to research projects in emergency departments, trauma bays, operating rooms, and intensive care units.







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