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Michigan Tech, Caryn Heldt, Virus, Hydrophobicity, Surface Chemistry, Vaccine Development, Vaccine

Hydrophobic Proteins on Virus Surfaces Can Help Purify Vaccines

Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellant, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.

Medicine

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Drug Trial for Solid Cancer Tumors, Lynch Syndrome Awareness, Side Effects for Prostate Cancer Treatments, and More in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Medicine

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Kenneth Tung, Immune System, Lymphatic System, Immune Privilege, Testes, Cancer Vaccine, Cancer, Testicles, Male Reproduction, Reproduction, Sperm, Infertility, Autoimmune, Autoimmune Disorders, Autoimmune Disease, Autoimmune Diseases, UVA, University Of Virginia, Beirne Carter, Beirne Carter Center for Immunology Research, Immunology, Medical Research, UVA Sch

UVA Discovers ANOTHER Immune System Link Science Said Didn't Exist

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UVA researchers have again shown that a part of the body thought to be disconnected from the immune system actually interacts with it, and that discovery helps explain cases of male infertility, certain autoimmune diseases and even the failure of cancer vaccines.

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Penn AIDS Researcher Receives $16.3 Million from NIAID to Hasten HIV Vaccine Development

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Building on earlier work in designing chimeric human-simian immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that serve as a model of HIV infection of humans, George M. Shaw, MD, PhD, a professor of Hematology/Oncology and Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received $16.3 million over five years from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop a long-sought-after HIV vaccine.

Medicine

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Pancreatic Cancer, Intratumoral Therapeutic Delivery, PANVAC, intratumoral vaccination, Rutgers University, New Jersey

Direct Tumor Vaccination Shown to Induce Anti-Tumor Immunity and Increase Survival in a Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer

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Building on their previous research focusing on vaccination within a tumor (intratumoral) for the most common form of pancreatic cancer, investigators from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have shown that in a mouse model of early stage resected pancreatic cancer, intratumoral vaccination induces an anti-tumor response that results in a significant improvement in overall survival.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Hiv Vaccine, broadly neutralizing antibodies

Researchers Map Pathways to Protective Antibodies for an HIV Vaccine

A Duke Health-led research team has described both the pathway of HIV protective antibody development and a synthetic HIV outer envelope mimic that has the potential to induce the antibodies with vaccination.

Medicine

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new appointment

The Wistar Institute Appoints Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen, Ph.D., as Assistant Professor in the Vaccine Center

The Wistar Institute announces the appointment of Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen, Ph.D., as assistant professor in Wistar’s Vaccine Center.

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Experimental Malaria Vaccine Provides Durable Protection Against Multiple Strains in NIH Clinical Trial

An experimental malaria vaccine protected healthy subjects from infection with a malaria strain different from that contained in the vaccine, according to a study published today. The Phase 1 clinical trial is important because in places where malaria is common, there is usually more than one strain of malaria.

Life

Education

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UTHealth Researcher Awarded $1.5 Million to Increase HPV Vaccination Rates in Medically Underserved Areas

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded $1.5 million to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health for a project designed to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates among minority youth in medically underserved areas across Houston.

Medicine

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Tropical Disease, Hookworm, hookworm vaccine, Neglected Tropical Diseases, recombinant vaccine , Vaccine Development, Potency, Global Health, Global Medicine, Public Health

GW Researchers Develop Testing Program to Study Potency for Neglected Tropical Disease Vaccines

Researchers at the George Washington University have developed a way to test recombinant vaccines for their ability to stay effective after years of storage. Their research was published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.







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