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What Motivates College Students to Get the Flu Shot? Sometimes, It's as Little as $10

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The preliminary findings from a new study conducted by a team of Swarthmore College researchers indicates that a combination of financial incentives – even as little as $10 – and an endorsement from close friends might by the best way to increase flu vaccinations among college students.

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Middle-Aged Adults Were More Susceptible to the Flu Last Year Because of a New Viral Mutation

Wistar researchers have identified a new mutation in the H1N1 influenza virus that made it easily transmitted in middle-aged adults--those who should be able to resist the viral assault--during the 2013-2014 influenza season. .

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Nationality at Birth Plays a Role in U.S. Adult Vaccination Rates

Nationality at birth appears to play a significant role in whether or not adults in the United States are routinely vaccinated for preventable diseases, a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine finds, reflecting a risky medical lapse for more than one in ten people nationwide.

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Get Vaccinated: Flu Is Bigger Threat to You Than Ebola, Says USciences Prof

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With the 2014-15 flu season officially underway, pharmacy professor Daniel Hussar, PhD, at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy at University of the Sciences, urges people to stop worrying about Ebola and get a flu shot instead.

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Does My Child Need a Flu Shot or Not?

It’s a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year.

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JAMA Findings Reveal Vaccine Approach to Fight Pandemic Bird Flu

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A Saint Louis University study in JAMA reveals a vaccination strategy researchers can continue to study to protect people from bird flu that has the potential to become epidemic.

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This Year's Flu Season: What You Need to Know

Each year, 30,000 people die from influenza infection and its complications. In an effort to get ahead of the upcoming flu season, experts at Montefiore Medical Center are raising awareness about the importance of the flu vaccine, which remains the best option to reduce a person’s risk of contracting the virus. The flu season can start as early as late September and usually runs for about 12 to 15 weeks.

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Surprising Diversity of Antibody Family Provides Clues for HIV Vaccine Design

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have described how a single family of antibodies that broadly neutralizes different strains of HIV has evolved remarkably diverse structures to attack a vulnerable site on the virus. The findings provide clues for the design of a future HIV vaccine.

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Despite What You’ve Heard, Kids with Egg Allergies Should Get the Flu Shot

If you have a child with egg allergies, you may have been told they shouldn’t get the shot because of a possible reaction to the trace amounts of egg in the vaccine. Not true, says the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). Recent research has shown that administration of the flu vaccine is safe for kids with egg allergies.

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Increased Knowledge of HPV Vaccines Does Not Predict a Higher Rate of Vaccination

A year-long study of over 360 adolescents who were considered to be ideal candidates to receive the HPV vaccine showed that neither increased parental or adolescent knowledge about HPV or the vaccine resulted in higher rates of vaccination. That is, those with higher levels of knowledge were not more likely to obtain vaccination for themselves or their daughters.

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