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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-Oct-2014 1:00 PM EDT

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Proactive Monitoring Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapy Could Prolong Effectiveness

Proactive monitoring and dose adjustment of infliximab, a medication commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), could improve a patient’s chances of having a long-term successful response to therapy, a pilot observational study at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center concludes.

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Breast Milk May be Protective Against Devastating Intestinal Disorder

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Studies conducted by researchers at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles demonstrate that a protein called neuregulin-4 (NRG4)—present in breast milk, but absent from formula—may be protective against the intestinal destruction caused in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

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Gobbling Up Poison: A Method for Killing Colon Cancer

A new immunotoxin works by getting shuttled into cancer cells, selectively destroying colon cancer, thanks to a quirk of biology

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UCLA-Led Study Identifies Genetic Factors Involved in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

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UCLA researchers were part of a team that has discovered the interplay of several genetic factors that may be involved in the development of early-onset ulcerative colitis, a severe type of inflammatory bowel disease. The early research findings in mice suggest possible new targets for prevention and treatment strategies to address the inflammation generated by early-onset ulcerative colitis. The rare disease affects infants and young children and can lead to early development of colon cancer and an increased risk of liver damage.

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Study Shows Epigenetic Changes in Children with Crohn's Disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes—alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures—in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

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Pain Treatments Less Effective for Those with Irritable Bowel

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that the immune system is defective in people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, which is a major reason why sufferers have ongoing issues with pain.

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Growing Human GI Cells May Lead to Personalized Treatments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have made cell lines from individual patients in as little as two weeks. They said the cell lines can help them understand the underlying problems in the GI tracts of individual patients and be used to test new treatments.

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American College of Gastroenterology Releases Evidence-Based Systematic Review on Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Idiopathic Constipation

The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) published a new systematic review of evidence about the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) as a supplement to the August 2014 issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Should You Add Enzyme Supplements to Your Shopping List? Mayo Expert Explains Pros & Cons

Enzyme supplements available without a prescription are becoming increasingly popular, but should everyone add them to their shopping list? Brent Bauer, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, is co-author of a new paper in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on the pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes.

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