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Scientists Identify Gene Vital for Rebuilding Intestine After Cancer Treatment

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Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center found that a rare type of stem cell is immune to radiation damage thanks to high levels of a gene called Sox9.

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Atomic View of Bacterial Enzymes that Help Human Digestion

A group of researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada has reached deep into the human gut, plucked out a couple enzymes produced by bacteria residing there and determined their biological activities and molecular structures -- details that should shed new light on how we digest many of the foods we eat.

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McMaster Scientists Show a Link Between Intestinal Bacteria and Depression

The research explains the complex mechanisms of interaction and dynamics between the gut microbiota and its host. Data show that relatively minor changes in microbiota profiles or its metabolic activity induced by neonatal stress can have profound effects on host behaviour in adulthood.

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New Material Opens Possibilities for Super-Long-Acting Pills

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Researchers at MIT’s Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Massachusetts General Hospital have created a polymer gel that could allow for the development of long-acting devices that reside in the stomach, including orally delivered capsules that can release drugs over a number of days, weeks, or potentially months following a single administration.

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Medicare Payment Cuts, Schizophrenia Gene, Leukemia Treatment, and More Top Stories 24 July 2015

Other topics include ethnic disparities in pain treatment, colon cancer and IBD, halting Liver cancer, and more...

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UCLA Scientists Discover Breakthrough Experimental Therapy to Treat Colon Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information.

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Elective Surgery Is Associated with Lower Risk of Death than Drugs for Ulcerative Colitis Treatment

Patients over 50 with ulcerative colitis (UC), a chronic disease of the colon, who undergo surgery to treat their condition live longer than those who are treated with medications, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The results are published this week in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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‘Biosimilars’ for Children with IBD Need More Research, ESPGHAN Expert Panel States

Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who are doing well on specific biological medications should not be switched to recently approved "biosimilar" products, concludes an expert consensus statement of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). The statement appears in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, the official journal of the European Society of Paediatric Gatroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, published by Wolters Kluwer.

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Women Inventors, Treating Anorexia, 3D Models of the Intestine, and More Top Stories 9 July 2015

Other topics include the importance of nursing in medicine, more efficient drug development, studying the arts improves medical care, and more...

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3D Views Reveal Intricacies in Intestines That Could Lead to Discoveries for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

A technology whose roots date to the 1800s has the potential to offer an extraordinary new advantage to modern-day medicine. In findings published this month in Nature Communications, Case Western Reserve scientists detail how stereomicroscopy can provide physicians an invaluable diagnostic tool in assessing issues within the gastrointestinal tract.