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  • Embargo expired:
    24-May-2018 6:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695130

Study Suggests Obese Children Who Drink Recommended Amount of Milk Have Less Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Obese children who consume at least two servings of any type of cow’s milk daily are more likely to have lower fasting insulin, indicating better blood sugar control, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released:
24-May-2018 6:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695072

New Jersey Health Care Providers, Community Members, and Researchers Come together to Address Disparities and Improve Screening Opportunities for Colorectal and Lung Cancers

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Health care providers, community members, and researchers from across New Jersey came together at the ‘Conference for Change’ event, hosted by the New Jersey Primary Care Association and sponsored by ScreenNJ to address the need to improve screening rates for colorectal and lung cancers.

Released:
24-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695022

Wolters Kluwer and American College of Gastroenterology Announce Publishing Partnership

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Wolters Kluwer Health announced today a publishing partnership with the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) that adds three titles to the Lippincott portfolio. Beginning in January 2019, Wolters Kluwer will publish ACG’s flagship scientific publication, The American Journal of Gastroenterology, as well as two additional official publications, Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology (CTG) and ACG Case Reports Journal.

Released:
23-May-2018 1:40 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694921

Surveillance Intensity Not Associated with Earlier Detection of Recurrence or Improved Survival in Colorectal Cancer Patients

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A national retrospective study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found no association between intensity of post-treatment surveillance and detection of recurrence or overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I, II or III colorectal cancer (CRC). Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study is the largest of surveillance intensity in CRC ever conducted.

Released:
22-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694689

Fight Colorectal Cancer Advocate Walking 2,800 Miles Across the U.S. To Raise Awareness of Preventable Disease

Fight Colorectal Cancer

Chad Schrack, a Fight Colorectal Cancer advocate is walking from Washington, D.C. to Venice Beach, California to honor his wife, a colorectal cancer survivor and all those affected by the second-leading cancer killer in the U.S.

Released:
17-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694760

New Blood Test Rapidly Detects Signs of Pancreatic Cancer

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers have developed a test that can screen for pancreatic cancer in just a drop of blood. The test, which is at the proof-of-concept stage, provides results in under an hour. It's simple: apply a drop of blood on a small electronic chip, turn the current on, wait several minutes, add fluorescent labels and look at the results under a microscope. If a blood sample tests positive for pancreatic cancer, bright fluorescent circles will appear.

Released:
17-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694767

Northwestern Medicine Expert Available to Comment on First Non-Opioid to Treat Withdrawal Symptoms

Northwestern Medicine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first non-opioid treatment to ease sudden withdrawal from opioids. Lucemyra was approved for up to 14 days of treatment for adults to ease common withdrawal symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea, muscle pain and agitation.

Released:
17-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694748

Polly’s Run Races Against Pancreatic Cancer

University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

Polly’s Run, a fundraiser to support pancreatic cancer research, will take place Sunday, June 3, at Tiguex Park near Albuquerque’s Old Town. The event will feature a 5K run/walk that starts at 8:30 a.m. and a Kid’s K that starts at 9:30 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Polly Rogers Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund at The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Released:
17-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694746

Ovarian Cancer Drug Shows Promise in Pancreatic Cancer Patients with BRCA Mutation

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options. An international team of researchers led by the Perelman School of Medicine and the Basser Center for BRCA at the University of Pennsylvania reported their findings this week in JCO Precision Oncology.

Released:
17-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694528

Under Certain Conditions, Bacterial Signals Set the Stage for Leukemia

University of Chicago Medical Center

A new study by researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.

Released:
14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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