Feature Channels:

Digestive Disorders

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Autoimmune Warriors, Controversial Ciggarette Coupons, Online Drug Education, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Nanoengineering, nanotechnnology, micromotors, Micromachines, Drug Delivery, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, Stomach Infection, Helicobacter Pylori, In Vivo

Drug-Delivering Micromotors Treat Their First Bacterial Infection in the Stomach

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.

Medicine

Channels:

Differentiation, T Cell, gene programs, Embryonic Stem Cells, tran, Epigenetic, Epigenomic, genome topology, Metabolism, Glutamine, alpha-ketoglutarate, ccctc-binding factor, Ctcf

How a Nutrient, Glutamine, Can Control Gene Programs in Cells

RS18362_AmyWeinmann-DanielleChisolm-6-scr.jpg

An intracellular metabolite of glutamine regulates cellular differentiation programs by changing the DNA-binding patterns of a transcription factor and by altering genome interactions. Genome context near the binding sites affects whether the binding turns on or turns off gene programs.

Medicine

Channels:

Colon & Rectum, Surgery

Making Surgery Safer

In the September 2017 issue of Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, surgeons from the Mayo Clinic show that use of a single dose of antibiotic before surgery results in a very low rate of wound infection following colon surgery.

Medicine

Channels:

Liver Transplant, Braden Scale, Organ Transplantation

Routine Hospital Tool Found to Predict Poor Outcomes After Liver Transplantation

SundaramVinay-Med.jpg

A routinely used hospital tool can predict which liver transplant recipients are more likely to do poorly after surgery, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai. The findings could help doctors identify which patients should receive physical therapy or other targeted interventions to improve their recovery.

Medicine

Channels:

Autoimmune Disease, Gastroenterolgy, human gut microbe, Biomedical Research, intestinal mirobiome, multiple sclerosis

Human Gut Microbe May Lead to Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Mayo Clinic researchers, along with colleagues at the University of Iowa, report that a human gut microbe discovered at Mayo Clinic may help treat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The findings appear in Cell Reports.

Medicine

Channels:

Science, Tissue Repair, Tissue Regeneration, Therapeutics, Drug Development, Prostaglandins, Healing, Internal Medicine, Gastroenterolgy, Liver, Colon, mice model, Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Case Western Reserve University Researchers Develop Therapeutic to Enhance Tissue Repair and Regeneration

Rodeo Therapeutics, a new drug development company created by two highly regarded Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers, has raised $5.9 million to develop small-molecule drugs that promote the body’s repair of diseased or damaged tissues.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

intestinal inflammation , Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Therapeutic, National Institute Of Diabetes And Digestive And Kidney Diseases, National Institutes Of Health (NIH), Didier Merlin, Tim Denning, Nanoparticles, Institute for Biomedical Sciences

Researchers Get $1.4 Million to Study Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Treat Intestinal Inflammation

Screen-Shot-2017-08-07-at-9.14.44-AM.png

Researchers in Georgia State University’s Institute for Biomedical Sciences have received a four-year, $1.4 million federal grant to study novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of intestinal inflammation.

Medicine

Channels:

Influenza, gut microbiome, Flavonoids

Natural Compound Coupled with Specific Gut Microbes May Prevent Severe Flu

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a particular gut microbe can prevent severe flu infections in mice, likely by breaking down naturally occurring compounds — called flavonoids — commonly found in foods such as black tea, red wine and blueberries.

Medicine

Channels:

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, gut microbiome, Lactobacillus, Probiotics

Protein-Rich Diet May Help Soothe Inflamed Gut

The combination of a bacterium that normally lives in the gut and a protein-rich diet promotes a more tolerant, less inflammatory gut immune system, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, suggest a way to tilt the gut immune system away from inflammation, potentially spelling relief for people living with inflammatory bowel disease.







Chat now!