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Science

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Plants, Biochemistry, Entomology, Wildlife Ecology, soil, soil biology

Adding Silicon to Soil to Strengthen Plant Defenses

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Researchers from the University of Delaware have joined a team from Western Sydney University in Australia to examine the addition of silicon to the soil in which plants are grown to help strengthen plants against potential predators.

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Phytoremediation, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Ames, University of Washington, Trichloroethylene, TCE, poplar tree

Probiotics Help Poplar Trees Clean Up Toxins in Superfund Sites

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Biologists conducted the first large-scale experiment on a Superfund site using poplar trees fortified with a probiotic — or natural microbe — to clean up groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene, or TCE.

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Environment, urban agriculture, Urban Air Pollution, tree cover, Trees Urbanization Ozone

WVU Completes Study Estimating Urban Forests Provide More Than $59 Million in Ecosystem Services

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Urban forests capture pollutants, store carbons and have other significant benefits that can be quantified

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Phenology, Grassland, Prairie, Plant Science, Iowa State University, Climate, Climate Change

New Study Tracks Nonnative Plant Species in Timing of Grassland Green-Up

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The introduction of exotic, nonnative plant species to U.S. grasslands has led to changes in prairie phenology, or the timing of seasonal changes. A new study from an Iowa State University scientist details the magnitude of those changes.

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Climate Change Garden, Climate Change, Cornell Botanic Gardens, Horticulture, Agriculture, Sonja Skelly

Climate Change Gardens Brings Plants Back to the Future

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Plots of foliage thicken in Cornell University’s Climate Change Demonstration Garden. Located at the Cornell Botanic Gardens, these raised beds provide a living illustration of how future temperature conditions may affect plants.

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Carbon Fiber, Plants

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Aug-2017 5:00 AM EDT

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Aug-2017 5:00 AM EDT

Science

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Nature Communications, Flowers, Evolution, flowering plants, Charles Darwin, an abominable mystery, Juerg Schoenenberger, Hervé Sauquet, earliest flowers, revonstruction

What Flowers Looked Like 100 Million Years Ago

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Flowering plants with at least 300,000 species are by far the most diverse group of plants on Earth. They include almost all the species used by people for food, medicine, and many other purposes. However, flowering plants arose only about 140 million years ago, quite late in the evolution of plants, toward the end of the age of the dinosaurs, but since then have diversified spectacularly. No one knows exactly how this happened, and the origin and early evolution of flowering plants and especially their flowers still remains one of the biggest enigmas in biology, almost 140 years after Charles Darwin called their rapid rise in the Cretaceous "an abominable mystery". A new study, coordinated by Juerg Schoenenberger from the University of Vienna and Hervé Sauquet of the Université Paris-Sud and published in "Nature Communications" reconstructs the evolution of flowers and sheds new light on what the earliest flowers might have looked like.

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endangered bats, Mexican long-nosed bats, agave pollinators, bat migration

Endangered Bat Species Pollinates Agave Plants

A binational research group is collecting data on the migratory pattern of Mexican long-nosed bats. These bats pollinate the agave plant from which tequila is made. They migrate toward the corridor of agave and columnar cactus from Mexico to the Southwestern U.S. Researchers hope to save the species by understanding more about their migration.

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soil, mycorrhizal fungi, Roots, Plants

Do Plants and Soil Really ‘Talk’?

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Are your plants waxing poetic? The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) August 1 Soils Matter blog post explains how plants and soil communicate—even without the advantage of words.







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