Feature Channels:

Plants

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Biology, fish, Contaminants, Wastewater, Pharmaceuticals, Metabolism, Sewage

Pharmaceuticals and Other Emerging Contaminants Force Fish to Work Harder to Survive

Downstreamofplant1.jpeg

Pharmaceuticals and other man-made contaminants are forcing fish that live downstream from a typical sewage treatment plant to work at least 30 per cent harder just to survive, McMaster researchers have found.

Science

Channels:

Hugelkultur, Composting, Compost, gardenin, Vegetable, AgriLife, joe masabni, masabni

Hügelkultur: The Mound Method for Home Gardeners

mound1-300x160.jpg

A bedding system new to Texas – hügelkultur – is trending among home gardeners looking for low-maintenance ways to grow flowers, fruits and vegetables, said Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist Dr. Joe Masabni.

Science

Channels:

Land Cover, Land Use Dynamics, Landsat Satellites, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Geospatial Sciences Center for Excellence

More Accurately Identifying Forests, Grasses, Crops

ZhangMODISwork.jpg

A new program uses Landsat satellite data to automatically differentiate land cover into 16 categories in 30-meter resolution— and does so more accurately than other land cover products.

Science

Channels:

Honey Bees, Pollination, Agriculture, Crops, Plants, Diversity

Worldwide Importance of Honey Bees for Natural Habitats Captured in New Report

Apis-on-Opuntia.jpg

A new study integrating data from around the globe has shown that honey bees are the world’s most important single species of pollinator in natural ecosystems and a key contributor to natural ecosystem functions. The report weaves together information from 80 plant-pollinator interaction networks.

Science

Channels:

Crops, weed, weed control, organic agriculture, Agriculture

Robotic Weeders: To a Farm Near You?

IMG_0048.JPG

The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. Specialty crops such as lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions may be the first to benefit.

Science

Channels:

Civil Engineering, Drones, UAVS, Landmines, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (Uavs), Environmental Engineering, Plant Health, Drought

Missouri S&T Doctoral Student Enlists Drones to Detect Unexploded Landmines Through Changes in Plant Health

Manley-small.jpg

From U.S. Navy laboratories to battlefields in Afghanistan, researchers are lining up to explore the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to detect unexploded landmines. At Missouri University of Science and Technology, civil engineering doctoral student Paul Manley is enlisting a third variable —plant health — to see if drones can be used to more safely locate such weapons of destruction.

Science

Channels:

natural resource sciences, plant biodiversity, Ecology, Phragmites australis

Scientists Find That Genome Size Affects Whether Plants Become Invasive

A University of Rhode Island scientist who studies the invasive plant Phragmites was part of an international research team that found that the most significant factor in determining whether a plant will become invasive is the size of its genome.

Science

Channels:

Danforth Center, Andrea Eveland, Plant Science, The Plant Cell

Danforth Center Scientists Uncover a Genetic Mechanism that Could Enhance Yield Potential in Cereal Crops

The Eveland laboratory’s research findings, “Brassinosteroids modulate meristem fate and differentiation of unique inflorescence morphology in Setaria viridis”, were recently published in the journal The Plant Cell.

Science

Channels:

Archaeology, China, Irrigation, Desert, Silk Road

Did Ancient Irrigation Technology Travel Silk Road?

 Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. Louis have discovered an ancient irrigation system that allowed a farming community in arid northwestern China to raise livestock and cultivate crops in one of the world’s driest desert climates.Lost for centuries in the barren foothills of China’s Tian Shan Mountains, the ancient farming community remains hidden in plain sight — appearing little more than an odd scattering of round boulders and sandy ruts when viewed from the ground.

Science

Channels:

Agriculture, Parasites, Crops, Plants, Weeds, RNA, dodder

Scientists Discover How Parasite Hacks Into Its Victims to Seize Control of Host’s Genes in Plant-to-Plant Warfare

westwood.jpg

Understanding dodder’s covert communications weaponry system, which operates much like a computer virus, could provide researchers with a method to engineer parasite-resistant plants.







Chat now!