Feature Channels:

Pollution

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Bad Air Quality Along Utah’s Wasatch Front Causes More Than 200 Cases of Pneumonia Each Year

airqualitycrop.jpg

Air pollution erodes the health of adults over age 65, a population particularly vulnerable to the effects of pneumonia.

Science

Channels:

Stress, PTSD, fracking, Wildlife Conservation, oil and gas drilling

Industrial Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress, Reproductive Problems in Birds

WEBL_1.JPG

A new study by CU Boulder researchers found that blue birds nesting near noisy oil and gas operations have hormonal changes similar to people with PTSD, smaller nestlings and fewer eggs that hatch

Science

Channels:

Environment, Pollution, algal blooms, Septic Systems, Waste Water, Microcystis, Red Tides, Green Tides, Brown Tides, Toxins, toxic algae, Ecosystem, Water Treatment, Septic Tank, Indian River Lagoon, St. Lucie Estuary

Study Finds Source of Toxic Green Algal Blooms and the Results Stink

Florida’s St. Lucie Estuary received national attention in 2016 as toxic green algal blooms wreaked havoc on this vital ecosystem. A new study contradicts the widespread misconception that periodic discharges from Lake Okeechobee were responsible. Water samples gathered and tested in the year-long study provide multiple lines of evidence that human wastewater nitrogen from septic systems was a major contributor to the high nitrogen concentrations in the estuary and downstream coastal reefs.

Science

Channels:

Uniformed Services University, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, USU, Usuhs, Rhodotorula, Rhodotorula taiwanesis, radioactive waste, Bioremediation, Genome Sequencing, Yeast

Yeast May Be the Solution to Toxic Waste Clean-Up

About 46,000 nuclear weapons were produced during the Cold War era, leading to tremendous volumes of acidic radioactive liquid waste seeping into the environment. A new study suggests yeast as a potentially safer and more cost effective way to help clean up these radioactive waste sites. The study, “Prospects for Fungal Bioremediation of Acidic Radioactive Waste Sites: Characterization and Genome Sequence of Rhodotorula taiwanensis MD1149,” was published in Frontiers in Microbiology, Jan. 8.

Science

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Conservation in Colombia, Leaping Larvae, Electric Sense in Sharks, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Science

Channels:

Arctic, Clouds, Aerosol, Pollution, Air Pollution, Greenhouse Effect

Arctic Clouds Highly Sensitive to Air Pollution

ModisRGB-5.jpg

A study from University of Utah atmospheric scientist Tim Garrett and colleagues finds that the air in the Arctic is extraordinarily sensitive to air pollution, and that particulate matter may spur Arctic cloud formation. These clouds, Garrett writes, can act as a blanket, further warming an already-changing Arctic.

Science

Channels:

Energy, Clean Coal, Fossil Fuel

A Fossil Fuel Technology That Doesn’t Pollute

ironoxideparticle.jpg

Engineers at The Ohio State University are developing technologies that have the potential to economically convert fossil fuels and biomass into useful products including electricity without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

Medicine

Channels:

Balkan, coal, Air Pollution

Reducing Air Pollution From Coal Power Plants in the Western Balkans Would Save Thousands of Lives Annually

Tomorrow, ministers at the 15th ministerial council meeting of the Energy Community in Kosovo will adopt new rules for emission limits for coal power plants in the Western Balkans (as part of the transposition of the EU’s Industrial Emissions Directive into national law).

Medicine

Channels:

Pollution, Asthma, Children, Corinne Keet

Exposure to Larger Air Particles Linked to Increased Risk of Asthma in Children

pollution_child_city_iStock-643097046.jpg

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter — a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber — are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

Medicine

Channels:

Particulate Matter, Particulate Pollution, Asthma, Children, Lung Health, Respiratory Health

Coarse Particulate Matter May Increase Asthma Risk

coarsePM_tilling400px.jpg

Children exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.







Chat now!