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Low-Level Arsenic Exposure Before Birth Associated with Early Puberty and Obesity in Female Mice

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Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. The finding is significant because the exposure level of 10 parts per billion used in the study is the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard, or maximum allowable amount, for arsenic in drinking water. The study, which appeared online August 21 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, serves as a good starting point for examining whether low-dose arsenic exposure could have similar health outcomes in humans.

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Trace Heavy Metals in Plastics Pose No Immediate Food Safety Threat but May Lead to Long-Term Environmental Problems

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The trace amounts of toxic substances used to make plastics don’t contaminate the food or beverage products they contain at a significant level and pose no immediate threat to consumers, according to recent Iowa State University research. But the plastics may create environmental problems years after they’ve been used.

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Better-Tasting Grocery Store Tomatoes Could Soon Be on Their Way

Tomato lovers rejoice: Adding or rearranging a few simple steps in commercial processing could dramatically improve the flavor of this popular fruit sold in the grocery store, according to researchers. They will present their new work on the topic in Boston at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Change in Process of Disinfecting Spinach, Salad Greens Could Reduce Illness Outbreaks

Cross contamination in commercial processing facilities that prepare spinach and other leafy greens for the market can make people sick. But researchers are reporting a new, easy-to-implement method that could eliminate or reduce such incidences. The scientists will present their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Eliminating Water-Borne Bacteria with Pages From the Drinkable Book™ Could Save Lives

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Human consumption of bacterially contaminated water causes millions of deaths each year throughout the world—primarily among children. A researcher at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society today will discuss an inexpensive, simple and easily transportable nanotechnology-based method to purify drinking water. She calls it The Drinkable BookTM, and each page is impregnated with bacteria-killing metal nanoparticles.

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Tips for Lunch Box Food Safety

As Americans settle into their new fall routines with sending kids back to school and returning to work after relaxing vacations, they are packing more lunches for both school and work in an effort to save money. In this economy, packing your lunch or your child’s can save your family money, and ensure a safe and healthy meal.

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Food Safety Experts Available for Packed School Lunches

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Making a Better Nitrate Test Kit

This little black box could change how we study one of the world's biggest water quality issues. Our Michigan Tech team joined up with the Nitrate Elimination Company to create this this new nitrate test kit.

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Texas Tech Centers Work to Promote Water Quality, Conservation

The Water Resources Center and CASNR Water Center help promote water quality research through collaboration to preserve the region’s fresh water sources.

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Just Say ‘No’ to Drugs – in Water

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One teenager is tackling serious water quality issues that threaten the health of rivers, streams and groundwater. When she was just 14 years old, Maria Elena Grimmett was the youngest person published in the Journal of Environmental Quality. Now at 16, she has just put the final touches on her research of a plastic adsorbent that removes pharmaceutical drugs from water sources.