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Study Discovers Novel Pathway for Parasite Invasion and Dissemination

Researchers in the Center for Immunity and Inflammation at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School describe a novel hybrid invasion pathway that starts with the host cell eating the Toxoplasma parasite which, in turn, escapes to form its own vacuolar niche. This study has been published by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Study Demonstrates That Antibacterial Soaps Can Reduce Risk of Foodborne Illness

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Newly published research shows that the use of antibacterial soaps can reduce the spread of harmful bacteria – that often leads to foodborne illness – more effectively than using non-antibacterial soaps. “This research provides strong evidence that antibacterial soaps are significantly more effective than non-antibacterial soaps in reducing Shigella on the hands and its subsequent transfer to ready-to-eat foods,” the researchers wrote in the Journal of Food Protection.

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Serious Food Insecurity in Canada’s Remote Aboriginal North

A new expert panel report on food security in Northern Canada, has found that food insecurity among northern Aboriginal peoples requires urgent attention in order to mitigate impacts on health and well-being.

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Corralling Milk Microbes That Survive Pasteurization

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Corralling desperados with names like bacillus and paenibacillus will require ingenuity and an arsenal of weapons. These outlaws aren’t rustling cattle—they’re making milk sour and cheese soft and crumbly. For more than a century, milk has been heated to kill any bacteria or pathogens that can affect consumer health and shorten the shelf life of the product. However, microbes-- known as thermoduric--can survive pasteurization, according to South Dakota State University dairy science professor Sanjeev Anand. The Agricultural Experiment Station researcher has begun developing ways to combat heat-resistant microorganisms, a major challenge for the world’s dairy industry. His work is also supported by the Dairy Research Institute and the Midwest Dairy Food Research Center.

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West Virginia Chemical Spill Into Elk River Contaminating Air and Water Quality, According to Study

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The complexities and implications of the chemical spill into West Virginia‘s Elk River keep growing, according to a study led by Virginia Tech Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Andrea Dietrich.

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Ebola Expert Available to Comment on Outbreak

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UF/IFAS Finds Way to Reduce E. coli in Cows, Improving Food Safety

A new treatment, using microparticles made from chitosan, could help dairy cattle stave off uterine diseases and eventually could help improve food safety for humans.

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Shale Could Be Long-Term Home for Problematic Nuclear Waste

Shale, the source of the United States’ current natural gas boom, could help solve another energy problem: what to do with radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. The unique properties of the sedimentary rock and related clay-rich rocks make it ideal for storing the potentially dangerous spent fuel for millennia, according to a geologist studying possible storage sites. He presented his research today at the 247th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Animal Sciences Expert Available to Speak About Meat Science, Meat Processing, and Food Safety

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High-Tech Materials Purify Water with Sunlight

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Sunlight plus a common titanium pigment might be the secret recipe for ridding pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potentially harmful pollutants from drinking water. Scientists reported today at the 247th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society that they have combined several high-tech components to make an easy-to-use water purifier that could work with the world’s most basic form of energy, sunlight, in a boon for water purification in rural areas or developing countries.

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