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What’s Behind the Heartbreaking Risk of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

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Researchers have known for more than a decade that the risk of heart disease and stroke increases when people take pain relievers like ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Now, scientists from the University of California, Davis, have uncovered some of the reasons why these drugs can harm heart tissue.

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More Than Just Eyes and Skin: Vitamin A Affects the Heart

Vitamin A is important for heart development in embryos, but whether it has a role in maintaining heart health is unclear. A new study in American Journal of Physiology—Heart and Circulatory Physiology finds that the heart is able to respond to vitamin A and the amount of vitamin A present has an effect. However, whether the effects are beneficial or harmful is still a mystery.

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Study Shows How Different People Respond to Aspirin — an Important Cardioprotective Drug

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The team identified more than 5,600 lipids in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin.

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Gene Therapy Halts Progression of Pulmonary Hypertension in a Large Animal Pre-Clinical Study

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure.

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First Implantable Hemodynamic Monitoring Device in Single Ventricle Fontan Anatomy

While the Fontan procedure has improved the short- and mid-term outcomes for patients born with single ventricle anatomy, long-term complications of Fontan circulation include heart failure. These complications are thought to be secondary to elevated central venous pressure, chronic venous congestion and low cardiac output.

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Eating Chocolate Each Day Could Reduce Heart Disease and Diabetes Risk

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A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. Including a small amount of chocolate each day could help prevent diabetes and insulin resistance. That’s one of the research findings from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), the University of Warwick Medical School, the University of South Australia and the University of Maine.

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Sedentary Lifestyle Associated with Coronary Artery Calcium, UT Southwestern Dallas Heart Study Researchers Find

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Cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that sedentary behavior is associated with increased amounts of calcium deposits in heart arteries, which in turn is associated with a higher risk of heart attack.

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Pinellas County a Model for Mosquito-Borne Disease Surveillance, Scientists Unravel the Genetic Evolution of Zika Virus, Worm Infection Counters Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more in the Infectious Diseases News Source

Pinellas County a Model for Mosquito-Borne Disease Surveillance, Scientists Unravel the Genetic Evolution of Zika Virus, Worm Infection Counters Inflammatory Bowel Disease and more in the Infectious Diseases News Source

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Time Spent Working Rotating Night Shift and Risk of Heart Disease

Among female registered nurses, working a rotating night shift for 5 years or more was associated with a small increase in the risk of coronary heart disease, according to a study appearing in the April 26 issue of JAMA.

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CPR Training at the State Fair Wins Top Award for UofL Cardiologist

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An assistant professor of medicine in the University of Louisville's Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, won first place in the category of “Young Investigator Awards in Cardiovascular Health Outcomes and Population Genetics” from the American College of Cardiology earlier this month.

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Higher Muscle Mass Associated with Lower Mortality Risk in People with Heart Disease

FINDINGS Researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA found that cardiovascular disease patients who have high muscle mass and low fat mass have a lower mortality risk than those with other body compositions. The findings also suggest that regardless of a person’s level of fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death.

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In Child Heart Patients, a Novel Approach Improves Symptoms of Hazardous Lymph Blockage

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects.

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Mechanics of a Heartbeat Are Controlled by Molecular Strut in Heart Muscle Cells

Molecular struts called microtubules interact with the heart’s contractile machinery to provide mechanical resistance for the beating of the heart, which could provide a better understanding of how microtubules affect the mechanics of the beating heart, and what happens when this goes awry.

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Missed Nursing Care May Contribute to Racial Disparities in Rehospitalizations After Heart Attack

Why are black older adults at higher risk of repeat hospital admission after a heart attack? Treatment at hospitals with higher rates of missed nursing care may be a contributing factor, reports a study in the May issue of Medical Care.

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Confused Cells Lead to Genetic Disorders Like Heart Problems, Premature Aging

It has been disorienting to the scientific and medical community as to why different subtle changes in a protein-coding gene causes many different genetic disorders in different patients -- including premature aging, nerve problems, heart problems and muscle problems. no other gene works like this. According to a new study, co-authored by Binghamton University faculty Eric Hoffman, it has to do with cell “commitment.”

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Research Links Heart Disease with Testosterone

Testosterone might be involved in explaining why men have a greater risk of heart attacks than women of similar age, according to a study funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

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The Role of Family and the Media in Childhood Obesity, and more Children's Health News in the Newswise Channels

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Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Herceptin Treatment Should Be Monitored for Heart Damage Regardless of Age: Ontario Study

Breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with trastuzumab-containing regimens should be monitored for heart damage regardless of age. This is among the findings of a new study from the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, University Health Network (UHN).

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Diabetes Drug, Metformin, Lowers Risk of Heart Disease Deaths Better Than Sulfonylureas, New Analysis Shows

A new analysis of 204 studies involving more than 1.4 million people suggests that metformin, the most frequently prescribed stand-alone drug for type 2 diabetes, reduces the relative risk of a patient dying from heart disease by about 30 to 40 percent compared to its closest competitor drug, sulfonylurea.

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UT Southwestern Researchers Identify Enzyme Link Between Excessive Heart Muscle Growth, Cancer Growth

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UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells – a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke.