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Science

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Starlit Memories Lead Scientist Back to His Roots

Thanasis Economou's early fascination with the heavens led to a vital role in the study of the solar system at the University of Chicago. But his memories tugged at him again during a trip to Greece two years ago, and led him to propose building an astronomical observatory near his childhood home.

Science

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Hubble Space Telescope, Pluto, surface changes, brightness, Color, Albedo, Dwarf Planet, Advanced Camera For Surveys, Faint Object Camera

Pluto's White, Dark-Orange, and Charcoal-Black Terrain Captured by NASA's Hubble

NASA has released the most detailed and dramatic images ever taken of the distant dwarf planet Pluto. The images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope show an icy, mottled, dark molasses-colored world undergoing seasonal surface color and brightness changes.

Science

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Climate Change, Ocean Acidification, Carbon Dioxide Atmosphere, Carbon Dioxide, Marine Biology, Antarctica, Antarctic Research

Oceans Reveal Further Impacts of Climate Change

The increasing acidity of the world’s oceans – and that acidity’s growing threat to marine species – are definitive proof that the atmospheric carbon dioxide that is causing climate change is also negatively affecting the marine environment, says world-renowned Antarctic marine biologist Jim McClintock, Ph.D., professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Biology.

Medicine

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Coronary, Artery, Perfusion, Imaging, CT, Cardiology, Heart, Catheterization, Heart Attack, Vessel

Tiny Constraints in Heart Blood Flow: A Better Sign of Blood Vessel Narrowing and Early Coronary Artery Disease

Cardiologists and heart imaging specialists at 15 medical centers in eight countries, and led by researchers at Johns Hopkins, have enrolled the first dozen patients in a year-long investigation to learn whether the subtle squeezing of blood flow through the inner layers of the heart is better than traditional SPECT nuclear imaging tests and other diagnostic radiology procedures for accurately tracking the earliest signs of coronary artery clogs.

Medicine

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H1N1, Swine Flu, Pediactrics, Summer Camp, Infection Control, Pandemic Flu, Antivirals, Flu Prevention, Vaccination

Targeted Prevention Measures Stopped Spread Of H1N1 Flu at Alabama Boys Camp, Doctor Says

Providing preventive Tamiflu and educating and emphasizing the need for repeated hand sanitizer use and disinfectant spray helped stop the spread of H1N1 influenza at a boys' summer camp in northern Alabama, according to David Kimberlin, M.D., the co-director of the UAB Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

Medicine

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Autism, Measles Vaccine, The Lancet

Research Retraction Breaks Link Between Autism and Mmr Vaccine, Says Neurologist

The Lancet, a premier British medical journal, today retracted a study published in 1998 that drew a link between the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine and increased incidence of autism. Alan Percy, M.D., professor of pediatric neurology and medical director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Civitan International Research Center, said the retracted study’s findings long have been questioned by the scientific community.

Medicine

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Stress, Alcoholism, Alcohol Abuse, Alcohol Addiction, sex abuse, Alcohol Dependence, Child Sexual Abuse, Haplotype, Midwest Alcoholism Research Center

Gene Variation Makes Alcoholism Less Likely in Some Survivors of Sexual Abuse

Exposure to severe stress early in life increases the risk of alcohol and drug addiction. Yet surprisingly, some adults sexually abused as children — and therefore at high risk for alcohol problems — carry gene variants that protect them from heavy drinking and its effects, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Science

Hematology, Anemia, Blood, Red Blood Cells, Thalassemia, Sickle Cell Anemia, Myelodysplastic, Biology, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, medicine health

Blood Protein Offers Help Against Anemia

A new study shows that a protein found in blood alleviates anemia, a condition in which the body’s tissues don’t get enough oxygen from the blood. In this animal study, injections of the protein, known as transferrin, also protected against potentially fatal iron overload in mice with thalassemia, a type of inherited anemia that affects millions of people worldwide.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Haiti, haiti earthquake, haiti relief, Nutrition & Children, Malnutrition, Public Health

Prof. Survives Haiti Earthquake; Focuses on Preventing Further Public Health Disaster

Two days before the earthquake, Lora Iannotti, Ph.D., nutrition and public health expert from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, traveled to Port-au-Prince and Leogane, Haiti, to continue her research about undernutrition and disease prevention in young children. The massive tremor changed her focus from research for the future to survival, with her team helping children in the aftermath of the quake. Iannotti says that there are some immediate actions that can be taken to prevent more lost lives and protect livelihoods.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Homelessness, Poverty, Social Policy

At Home on the Street: First-Person Look At Homelessness

In their new book At Home on the Street: People, Poverty and a Hidden Culture of Homelessness, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Associate Professor of Sociology Jeffrey Michael Clair, Ph.D., and UAB alumnus Jason Wasserman, Ph.D., give readers an in-depth look at long-term homelessness and show the true meaning of life on the street.







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