Are Wetlands Really the “Earth’s Kidneys”?

Cleaning the Earth, one watershed at a time

  • Credit: SV Fisk

    Streams, like this one in the Rockies, accept snowmelt year-round.

Newswise — Dec. 15, 2017 – Healthy wetlands are hard-working water filters! The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) December 15 Soils Matter blog post explains the role of wetlands—and how we can keep them functioning.

As rainwater moves over the landscape, sediment and chemicals can be picked up and carried along. “A wetland traps and removes waste coming to it from the environment. The water released by wetlands is cleaner than what flowed into it,” says Jim Friedericks, Outreach and Education, AgSource.com.

“Not only are wetlands natural filters in the environment, they also provide habitat for wildlife and areas for recreation. Because they act as these filters, they can become degraded if they are loaded with too much sediment or nutrients in the water.”

Preventing erosion and nutrient runoff protects these valued ecosystems from degradation.

To read the entire blog post, visit https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2017/12/15/are-wetlands-rea…e-earths-kidneys/.

Follow SSSA on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SSSA.soils, Twitter at SSSA_Soils. SSSA has soils information on www.soils.org/discover-soils, for teachers at www.soils4teachers.org, and for students through 12th grade, www.soils4kids.org.

The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is a progressive international scientific society that fosters the transfer of knowledge and practices to sustain global soils. Based in Madison, WI, and founded in 1936, SSSA is the professional home for 6,000+ members and 1,000+ certified professionals dedicated to advancing the field of soil science. The Society provides information about soils in relation to crop production, environmental quality, ecosystem sustainability, bioremediation, waste management, recycling, and wise land use.


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