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Declining Catch Rates in Caribbean Nicaragua Green Turtle Fishery May Be Result of Overfishing

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A 20-year assessment of Nicaragua’s legal, artisanal green sea turtle fishery has uncovered a stark reality: greatly reduced overall catch rates of turtles in what may have become an unsustainable take, according to conservation scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Florida.

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Everyone on Earth Is Invited to Earth Day Tweet-Up and Can Now Watch What Happens Live During Meet and Tweet with Stony Brook University’s Three Indianapolis Prize Finalists

On Earth Day, April 22, not only will everyone on the planet be able to bond on Twitter with Stony Brook University’s three Indianapolis Prize finalists – Russ Mittermeier, Carl Safina and Pat Wright – they will also be able to watch a live webcast of the University’s first ever “Tweet-Up” featuring these three remarkable conservationists.

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Shade Grown Coffee Shrinking as a Proportion of Global Coffee Production

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According to a new study, over the past couple of decades, global coffee production has been shifting towards a more intensive, less environmentally friendly style. That's pretty surprising if you live in the U.S. and you've gone to the grocery store or Starbucks, where sales of environmentally and socially conscious coffees have risen sharply and now account for half of all U.S. coffee sales by economic value.

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UMD Climate Research Capabilities Potential Resource for Maryland and the Nation

On April 1, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland (UMD) welcomed the Honorable Nancy Kopp, Treasurer of the State of Maryland, and Deputy State Treasurer, Susanne Brogan, for a briefing on environmental and climate research programs at the University of Maryland Research Park (M-Square).

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Worldwatch Institute Launches State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability

The Worldwatch Institute will release State of the World 2014: Governing for Sustainability, the latest edition of its signature book series, on April 29. This edition discusses the immediate need for governments, private entities, and social groups to work together as a means to create a more sustainable future.

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Warm U.S. West, Cold East: A 4,000-Year Pattern

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Last winter’s curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, and suggests it may worsen as Earth’s climate warms.

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NutNet: New Model for Global Research

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What do zebra and kangaroos have in common? At first glance, not much — they aren’t even found in the same part of the world. But here’s one thing they do share: Both are part of the Nutrient Network, an innovative research cooperative spanning six continents that represents the first time anyone has used standardized ecological methods and measurements on such a global scale.

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Gut Capacity Limits Wildlife’s Ability to Adapt to Rapid Climate Change

A URI ornithologist has found that the capacity of a bird’s gut to change with environmental conditions is a primary limiting factor in their ability to adapt to the rapidly changing climate. And he believes that most other animals are also limited in a similar way.

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Predicting Bioavailable Cadmium Levels in Soils

New Zealand study shows soil pH and iron levels predict cadmium bioavailability, offers solutions to farmers and ranchers

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Bioarchaeologists Link Climate Instability to Human Mobility in Ancient Sahara

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Studies by researchers at Arizona State University and University of Chicago uncovered clues to how past peoples moved across their landscape as the once lush environment deteriorated.

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