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Newswise: d1150619-hr.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714302

Electron (or 'Hole') Pairs May Survive Effort to Kill Superconductivity

Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists seeking to understand the mechanism underlying superconductivity in “stripe-ordered” cuprates—copper-oxide materials with alternating areas of electric charge and magnetism—discovered an unusual metallic state when attempting to turn superconductivity off. They found that under the conditions of their experiment, even after the material loses its ability to carry electrical current with no energy loss, it retains some conductivity—and possibly the electron (or hole) pairs required for its superconducting superpower.

Released:
12-Jun-2019 2:20 PM EDT
Newswise: Researchers grow bone at rib to restore facial bone

Article ID: 714231

Researchers grow bone at rib to restore facial bone

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Bioengineers used bone engineered in 3D-printed mold and grown alongside the ribs of sheep to successfully replace a portion of the animals’ jaw bones. They hope to develop the tissue regenerative procedure for human application .

Released:
11-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 714224

Drug to Treat Malaria Could Mitigate Hereditary Hearing Loss

Case Western Reserve University

The ability to hear depends on proteins to reach the outer membrane of sensory cells in the inner ear. But in certain types of hereditary hearing loss, mutations in the protein prevent it from reaching these membranes.

Released:
11-Jun-2019 11:50 AM EDT

Article ID: 714199

Sex, lice and videotape

University of Utah

University of Utah biologists demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years. They began with a single population of parasitic feather lice, split the population in two and transferred them onto different-sized hosts—pigeons with small feathers, and pigeons with large feathers. The pigeons preened at the lice and populations adapted quickly by evolving differences in body size. When paired together, males and females that were too different or too similar in size laid zero eggs.

Released:
10-Jun-2019 6:20 PM EDT
Newswise: Hamsters take cues from decreasing day length to prepare for the long winter
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jun-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714111

Hamsters take cues from decreasing day length to prepare for the long winter

University of Chicago Medical Center

Analysis of the first fully-sequenced genome of the Siberian hamster shows how these small, seasonal breeders adapt their bodies and energy usage to survive the winter. The study shows that shifting day length alone was enough to trigger these changes, regardless of temperature or how much food is available.

Released:
7-Jun-2019 12:25 PM EDT
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Article ID: 713891

Floating power plants

Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Huge floating solar islands on the ocean that produce enough energy to enable CO2-neutral global freight traffic - what sounds like "science fiction" researchers from ETH Zurich, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Empa, the Universities of Zurich and Bern and the Nowegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim have now calculated for the first time, as they write in the latest issue of the journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" (PNAS).

Released:
4-Jun-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 713833

Drug-resistant tuberculosis reversed in lab

Washington University in St. Louis

Tuberculosis is the most lethal infectious disease in the world. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Umea University in Sweden have found a compound that can prevent and even reverse antibiotic resistance in TB bacteria.

Released:
3-Jun-2019 12:40 PM EDT
Newswise: De-TOXing exhausted T cells may bolster CAR T immunotherapy against solid tumors
  • Embargo expired:
    27-May-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713373

De-TOXing exhausted T cells may bolster CAR T immunotherapy against solid tumors

La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A decade ago researchers announced development of a cancer immunotherapy called CAR (for chimeric antigen receptor)-T, in which a patient is re-infused with their own genetically modified T cells equipped to mount a potent anti-tumor attack.

Released:
23-May-2019 4:05 AM EDT
Newswise: A forest “glow” reveals awakening from hibernation
  • Embargo expired:
    27-May-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713487

A forest “glow” reveals awakening from hibernation

University of Utah

Gross Primary Production (GPP) in forests tells scientists how much CO2 these systems are breathing in. Evergreen trees retain their green needles year round, preventing scientists from detecting GPP on large scales. A study linked GPP with solar-induced fluorescence in evergreens, which can be tracked by satellites.

Released:
24-May-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Science Snapshots: Lithium Under Pressure, A 'Silver Bullet' for the Conversion of Carbon Dioxide, Understanding Microbiomes for  Wastewater Treatment

Article ID: 713372

Science Snapshots: Lithium Under Pressure, A 'Silver Bullet' for the Conversion of Carbon Dioxide, Understanding Microbiomes for Wastewater Treatment

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium; a powerful combination of experiment and theory has revealed atomic-level details about how silver helps transform carbon dioxide gas into a reusable form; new study reports the first comprehensive

Released:
23-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT

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