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Article ID: 711369

Google Searches Reveal Popular Bird Species

Cornell University

Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
15-Apr-2019 4:15 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711215

Historic Logging Site Shows First Human-Caused Bedrock Erosion Along an Entire River

University of Washington

Studies of a river used in 20th-century logging shows that the bedrock has eroded to create a new channel. Such human-driven geology may be common worldwide.

Released:
11-Apr-2019 4:30 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711279

Synthetic Peptide Can Inhibit Toxicity, Aggregation of Protein in Alzheimer's Disease

University of Washington

A team led by researchers at the University of Washington has developed synthetic peptides that target and inhibit the small, toxic protein aggregates that are thought to trigger Alzheimer's disease.

Released:
12-Apr-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710919

Atomic Maps Reveal How Iron Rusts

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists discovered how iron atoms continually re-arrange on surfaces, offering insights into metal corrosion and soil remediation.

Released:
10-Apr-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710961

Police Stops Unintentionally Increase Criminal Behavior in Black and Latino Youths

New York University

New research finds that Black and Latino adolescent boys who are stopped by police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior thereafter. The study also demonstrates that police stops have a negative impact on the adolescents’ psychological well-being.

Released:
8-Apr-2019 5:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 710936

A Tiny Cry for Help from Inside the Liver Could Lead to Better Treatment

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

New research points to a potential way to prevent acute liver damage, or even treat it -- as well as a possible way to better monitor the health of patients who have suffered from it. It's based on the discovery that a protein involved in one of the liver’s most basic functions also sounds the alarm when liver cells get hurt.

Released:
8-Apr-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710633

Rise of religion pre-dates Incas at Lake Titicaca

Penn State University

An ancient group of people made ritual offerings to supernatural deities near the Island of the Sun in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia, about 500 years earlier than the Incas, according to an international team of researchers. The team's findings suggest that organized religion emerged much earlier in the region than previously thought.

Released:
2-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 710503

We’ve Been Thinking of How Ice Forms in Cirrus Clouds All Wrong

University of Utah

A new paper in PNAS finds that the previously thought mechanism for ice formation in humid but unsaturated conditions (like those in which cirrus clouds form) doesn’t work. Instead, another mechanism better explains ice (and thus cloud) formation – and the details are far from foggy.

Released:
1-Apr-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 710399

Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

Released:
28-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710391

New method drives cellular HIV reservoirs to self-destruct

Cornell University

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is no longer a death sentence, yet a cure remains elusive. While current therapies can successfully manage active infection, the virus can survive in tissue reservoirs – including macrophage cells, which play an important role in the immune system.

Released:
28-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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