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Article ID: 694913

Embryonic Gene Regulation Through Mechanical Forces

University of Vienna

sDuring embryonic development genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. In a new publication of the journal PNAS, the team of Ulrich Technau of the Department of Molecular Evolution and Development at the University of Vienna reported that besides the genetic program, also mechanical cues can contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development.

Released:
22-May-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694898

What an All-Nighter Does to Your Blood

University of Colorado Boulder

A new study looking at proteins in the blood over the 24-hour-cycle found 30 that vary depending on what time it is, and more than 100 that are disrupted by a simulated night shift

Released:
21-May-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694837

Research Suggests Sweet Potatoes Didn't Originate in the Americas

Indiana University

Sweet potatoes may seem as American as Thanksgiving, but scientists have long debated whether their plant family originated in the Old or New World. New research by an Indiana University paleobotanist suggests it originated in Asia, and much earlier than previously known.

Released:
21-May-2018 4:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694890

NIBIB-Funded Team Designs Rapid Diagnostic System for Debilitating Nutrient Deficiency

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A team of Cornell University engineers and nutritionists with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of NIH, have designed and tested a small, portable diagnostic system that can be used in the field to test blood for vitamin A and iron deficiencies.

Released:
21-May-2018 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694640

Scientists Turn X-ray Laser Into World’s Fastest Water Heater

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists have used a powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to heat water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond, or millionth of a millionth of a second.

Released:
15-May-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694624

Making Carbon Nanotubes as Usable as Common Plastics

Northwestern University

By using an inexpensive, already mass produced, simple solvent called cresol, Northwestern University's Jiaxing Huang has discovered a way to make disperse carbon nanotubes at unprecedentedly high concentrations without the need for additives or harsh chemical reactions to modify the nanotubes.

Released:
15-May-2018 2:55 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 694377

New Pig Virus Found to Be a Potential Threat to Humans

Ohio State University

A recently identified pig virus can readily find its way into laboratory-cultured cells of people and other species, a discovery that raises concerns about the potential for outbreaks that threaten human and animal health.

Released:
10-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694353

Study: New Tool Analyzes Disease and Drug Effects with Unprecedented Accuracy and Consistency

University at Buffalo

A new protein analysis tool developed at the University at Buffalo could increase the quality and accuracy of medical diagnosis and quicken the pace of pharmaceutical development.

Released:
10-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693621

Simple Treatment May Minimize Hearing Loss Triggered by Loud Noises

Keck Medicine of USC

New research from the Keck School of Medicine of USC reveals how traumatic noise damages hearing and identifies a potential way to preserve it

Released:
7-May-2018 3:40 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693926

Earth’s Orbital Changes Have Influenced Climate, Life Forms For at Least 215 Million Years

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Every 405,000 years, gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Venus slightly elongate Earth’s orbit, an amazingly consistent pattern that has influenced our planet’s climate for at least 215 million years and allows scientists to more precisely date geological events like the spread of dinosaurs, according to a Rutgers-led study. The findings are published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
7-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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