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Newswise: What’s MER? It’s a Way to Measure Quantum Materials, and It’s Telling US New and Interesting Things

What’s MER? It’s a Way to Measure Quantum Materials, and It’s Telling US New and Interesting Things

Ames Laboratory

Experimental physicists have combined several measurements of quantum materials into one in their ongoing quest to learn more about manipulating and controlling the behavior of them for possible applications. They even coined a term for it-- Magneto-elastoresistance, or MER.

Channels: Energy, Engineering, Materials Science, Physics, PNAS, DOE Science News, All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 1:25 PM EST
Newswise: In Mice, Alcohol Dependence Results in Brain-Wide Remodeling of Functional Architecture
Released:
14-Jan-2020 4:50 PM EST
Research Results
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Your Brain: Individual and Unique

American Technion Society

New findings show that individual variations in the brain’s structural connectome (map of neural connections) define a specific structural fingerprint with a direct impact on the functional organization of individual brains.

Channels: Healthcare, Neuro, Personalized Medicine, Technology, PNAS, All Journal News,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 2:25 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Suggest a Pathway to Reverse the Genetic Defect of Friedreich’s Ataxia
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST

Researchers Suggest a Pathway to Reverse the Genetic Defect of Friedreich’s Ataxia

Tufts University

Scientists report that the genetic anomaly causing the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia – the multiple repetition of a three letter DNA sequence – could potentially be reversed by enhancing a natural process that contracts the repetitive sequences in living tissue.

Channels: Cell Biology, Genetics, Neuro, PNAS, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
4-Jan-2020 7:05 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Research Identifies Changes in Neural Circuits Underlying Self-Control, Decision Making During Adolescent Brain Development

Research Identifies Changes in Neural Circuits Underlying Self-Control, Decision Making During Adolescent Brain Development

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania applied tools from network science to identify how anatomical connections in the brain develop to support neural activity underlying executive function.

Channels: Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Neuro, PNAS, All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Staff Picks,

Released:
3-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Researchers Identify Key Structure of C. Difficle Bacteria That Could Lead to Future Treatments

Researchers Identify Key Structure of C. Difficle Bacteria That Could Lead to Future Treatments

University of Maryland Medical Center

– Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and their colleagues have identified the structure of the most lethal toxin produced by certain strains of Clostridium difficile bacteria, a potentially deadly infection associated with the use of antibiotics. The researchers mapped out the delivery and binding components of the toxin, which could pave the way for new drugs to neutralize it.

Channels: Cell Biology, Chemistry, Infectious Diseases, PNAS, All Journal News,

Released:
2-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
  • Embargo expired:
    30-Dec-2019 3:00 PM EST

Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus

University of Washington

Life as we know it requires phosphorus, which is scarce. How did the early Earth supply this key ingredient? A University of Washington study, published Dec. 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds answers in certain types of carbonate-rich lakes.

Channels: Cell Biology, Chemistry, Geology, All Journal News, Environmental Science, Evolution and Darwin, PNAS, Staff Picks,

Released:
25-Dec-2019 2:00 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: A Fast and Inexpensive Device to Capture and Identify Viruses
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Dec-2019 12:10 PM EST

A Fast and Inexpensive Device to Capture and Identify Viruses

Penn State Materials Research Institute

A device to quickly capture and identify various strains of virus has been developed, according to researchers at Penn State and New York University.

Channels: Infectious Diseases, Nanotechnology, Ebola, Zika Virus, PNAS, All Journal News,

Released:
20-Dec-2019 12:55 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape

NUS researchers uncover how fish get their shape

National University of Singapore

A team of researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore investigated the science behind the formation of the ‘V’ patterns – also known as chevron patterns – in the swimming muscles of fish. The study focused on the myotome (a group of muscles served by a spinal nerve root) that makes up most of the fish body. These fish muscles power the fish’s side-to-side swimming motion and the chevron pattern is thought to increase swimming efficiency. The research team found that these patterns do not simply arise from genetic instruction or biochemical pathways but actually require physical forces to correctly develop.

Channels: All Journal News, Genetics, Marine Science, PNAS,

Released:
23-Dec-2019 3:05 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Scientists discover how proteins form crystals that tile a microbe’s shell

Scientists discover how proteins form crystals that tile a microbe’s shell

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Many microbes wear beautifully patterned crystalline shells. Now scientists have zoomed in on the very first step in microbial shell-building: nucleation, where squiggly proteins crystallize into sturdy building blocks. The results help explain how the shells assemble themselves so quickly.

Channels: All Journal News, Cell Biology, Microbiome, PNAS, DOE Science News,

Released:
17-Dec-2019 3:40 PM EST
Research Results


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