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Article ID: 711869

Researchers Use Shake-Table Testing To Improve Disaster Recovery

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M researchers use shake-table testing to understand how urban wood-based structures sustain damage from earthquakes, and how to repair them more efficiently.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711581

Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers

Los Alamos National Laboratory

A powerful computational study of southern California seismic records has revealed detailed information about a plethora of previously undetected small earthquakes, giving a more precise picture about stress in the earth’s crust.

Released:
18-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710968

New open-source software predicts impacts of extreme events on grids

Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new, free, open-source software reliably predicts how damage from hurricanes, ice storms, earthquakes, and other extreme events will restrict power delivery from utility grids. The Severe Contingency Solver for Electric Power Transmission is the only software available—commercially or open-source—that reliably supports analysis of extreme events that cause widespread damage.

Released:
9-Apr-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 710866

For UTEP Doctoral Student, Bumpy Paths Offer Trajectory to Success

University of Texas at El Paso

Masum Bhuiyan, a doctoral candidate in The University of Texas at El Paso's computational science program, said he first became interested in using data culled from seismic activity after observing earthquakes in 2014 in Arizona and several stock markets since 2008 during the time of the global financial crisis. Since then, he has honed his ability to use stochastic models such as stochastic volatility and stochastic differential equations to create forecasts.

Released:
5-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710291

Massive Earthquakes Provide New Insight into Deep Earth

Florida State University

In a first-ever study of two of the largest deep earthquakes ever recorded in human history, FSU researchers reveal new and surprising information about our planet’s mysterious, ever-changing interior.

Released:
27-Mar-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 708876

Dealing with the fallout in Fukushima–Part 1

Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Mar. 11 marks the 8th anniversary of Japan’s Tohuku earthquake. The tsunami that followed led to the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which spread radioactive materials throughout the area. The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) Mar. 1 blog explores the impact this has had on the farming village of Iitate, Japan.

Released:
4-Mar-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 708558

S&T Robot Test Standards Adopted in Japan’s Fukushima Decades-long Cleanup Efforts

Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed standard test methods for robots, which the Japanese government is now beginning to apply directly to their Fukushima cleanup efforts.

Released:
22-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 707496

MERMAIDs reveal secrets from below the ocean floor

Princeton University

Seismologists use waves generated by earthquakes to scan the interior of our planet, much like doctors image their patients using medical tomography. Earth imaging has helped us track down the deep origins of volcanic islands such as Hawaii, and identify the source zones of deep earthquakes.

Released:
4-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 707140

Hurricane Katrina’s aftermath included spike in heart disease hospitalizations

Tufts University

Hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease rose precipitously in Orleans and Jefferson parishes after Hurricane Katrina. The increase in rates lasted for more than one month after landfall and rates were higher among the older black population, compared to the older white population.

Released:
31-Jan-2019 12:05 AM EST

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