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Released: 6-Dec-2022 11:05 AM EST
Twin study links exercise to beneficial epigenetic changes
Washington State University

Consistent exercise can change not just waistlines but the very molecules in the human body that influence how genes behave, a new study of twins indicates.

Released: 6-Dec-2022 8:05 AM EST
New Report Details Steps to Reverse Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The Bloomberg American Health Initiative at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health released a report today setting out 10 practical steps to address major causes of declining life expectancy in the U.S.

   
Released: 5-Dec-2022 4:05 PM EST
We ain't misbehavin' here. The latest news in Behavioral Science on Newswise
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

       
Newswise: Positively Charged Nanomaterials Treat Obesity Anywhere You Want
29-Nov-2022 3:55 PM EST
Positively Charged Nanomaterials Treat Obesity Anywhere You Want
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia researchers invent new method to treat obesity by using cationic nanomaterials that can target specific areas of fat and inhibit the unhealthy storage of enlarged fat cells. “Our studies highlight an unexpected strategy to treat visceral adiposity and suggest a new direction of exploring cationic nanomaterials for treating metabolic diseases,” said Columbia Engineering’s Biomedical Engineering Prof Kam Leong, a pioneer in using polycation to scavenge pathogens.

   
Released: 30-Nov-2022 6:45 PM EST
Overweight women most likely to suffer long Covid
University of East Anglia

Overweight women are more likely to experience symptoms of long Covid according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Newswise: Believe it or ‘nut’, almonds can help you cut calories
Released: 20-Nov-2022 9:05 PM EST
Believe it or ‘nut’, almonds can help you cut calories
University of South Australia

Weight loss is never an easy nut to crack, but a handful of almonds could keep extra kilos at bay according to new research from the University of South Australia.

Released: 17-Nov-2022 8:35 PM EST
Deprivation in childhood linked to impulsive behaviour in adulthood – research
Aston University

Children who have experienced deprivation are more likely to make more impulsive choices than those who don’t and can lead to addictions in later life - research has shown.

Newswise: Study: Which People With Chronic Pancreatitis Will Develop Diabetes?
Released: 16-Nov-2022 12:05 PM EST
Study: Which People With Chronic Pancreatitis Will Develop Diabetes?
Cedars-Sinai

A new study by Cedars-Sinai investigators describes risk factors that could make it more likely for people who have chronic pancreatitis, an ongoing inflammation of the pancreas, to develop diabetes. The findings are published in Diabetes Care.

Released: 14-Nov-2022 4:25 PM EST
Bariatric Surgery Decreases Risk of Heart Disease
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A Rutgers study of obese adults, all with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and morbid obesity (body mass index > 40), has shown that those who underwent bariatric surgery suffered far fewer extreme cardiovascular events subsequently.

Newswise: Moderate Exercise Helps Colorectal Cancer Patients Live Longer by Reducing Inflammation and Improving Gut Bacteria, including in Patients Who Are Obese
Released: 14-Nov-2022 4:00 PM EST
Moderate Exercise Helps Colorectal Cancer Patients Live Longer by Reducing Inflammation and Improving Gut Bacteria, including in Patients Who Are Obese
University of Utah Health

A brisk walk for 20 minutes a day may not sound like much, but it could make a big difference for colorectal cancer patients. Regular physical activity reduces inflammation by improving the gut microbiome of patients, including patients who are obese, scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute found. They researched the impact of exercise on the gut microbiome, the trillions of bacteria that live in our digestive system. Investigators found moderate exercise improved outcomes in colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer in the United States, excluding skin cancers. Scientists explain why their findings are so significant.

Released: 14-Nov-2022 12:35 PM EST
Solving Childhood Obesity Requires Strong Connections Within Coalitions, New Study Suggests
Tufts University

New research says interdisciplinary coalitions working to end child obesity can more quickly create lasting change if members form close relationships, are able to learn new information rapidly, and can share that new knowledge both within their existing networks and with people in other sectors.

   
Released: 11-Nov-2022 2:15 PM EST
What makes mice fat, but not rats? Suppressing neuromedin U, study finds
Okayama University

Our sensory urges ranging from anger to hunger are regulated by hormonal or neuronal signals. Often, these impulses appear as behavioral responses, evoked through complex biological reactions.

Released: 10-Nov-2022 3:50 PM EST
Researchers bring eating disorder awareness to MO schools
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded researchers Ellen Fitzsimmons-Craft and Denise Wilfley a grant to help improve outcomes for eating disorders in adolescent girls.

Released: 9-Nov-2022 3:15 PM EST
Knowledge is power. The latest research on arthritis is right at your fingertips
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Arthritis channel on Newswise.

Released: 9-Nov-2022 10:55 AM EST
Severe obesity in youth a risk factor for early atrial fibrillation
University of Gothenburg

Severe or morbid obesity at age 18 may be linked to an elevated risk of atrial fibrillation in younger middle age. This is shown by a University of Gothenburg study comprising data on roughly 1.7 million men in Sweden.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 9:05 PM EST
Workplace cafeteria study finds no evidence that physical activity calorie-equivalent labelling changes food purchasing
University of Cambridge

An experiment carried out across ten workplace cafeterias found no significant change in the overall number of calories purchased when food and drink labels showed the amount of physical activity required to burn off their calories.

   
Newswise: Study confirms that processed foods key to rising obesity
Released: 8-Nov-2022 6:05 PM EST
Study confirms that processed foods key to rising obesity
University of Sydney

A year-long study of the dietary habits of 9,341 Australians has backed growing evidence that highly processed and refined foods are the leading contributor of rising obesity rates in the Western world.

Newswise: Study Identifies Potential New Treatment Target for Sleep Apnea
Released: 31-Oct-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Study Identifies Potential New Treatment Target for Sleep Apnea
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new study with obese mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that specialized channel proteins are possible therapeutic targets for sleep apnea and similar abnormally slow breathing disorders in obese people.

Newswise: Defect in Gene Caused Massive Obesity in Mice Despite Normal Food Intake
Released: 28-Oct-2022 4:45 PM EDT
Defect in Gene Caused Massive Obesity in Mice Despite Normal Food Intake
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A faulty gene, rather than a faulty diet, may explain why some people gain excessive weight even when they don’t eat more than others, UT Southwestern researchers at the Center for the Genetics of Host Defense have discovered.


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