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Presidential Debate: Expert Panel Gives Scientific Analysis of Candidates' Performances

Four expert panelists each day will present their analyses and answer your questions live and face-to-face. This event will be virtual. You can attend with any device -- PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device (with a webcam) – anywhere with good bandwidth. To participate (ask questions) in the meeting, you must be on video, just as a normal news conference. Register below for guaranteed seating; there is limited seating in the virtual room. Eight experts (four at each event) will present their analyses. The diverse expert team (7 universities and an institute) will analyze both candidates during the debates for their gestures, facial expressions (including smiles--number, type, appropriateness, etc.), posture, language, including sentiment, tone, inflammatory language, repetition, vocabulary, sentence structure, metaphors, framing, themes, suggestions, subtlety, nuance, honesty (deceit/lies—explicit and implicit), transparency, gender issues, and more...

Medicine

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HIV and AIDS, Hiv Treatment

Targeting Dormant HIV

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Discovery of a novel, advanced technique to identify the rare cells where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hides in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is an important step forward in the search for a HIV/AIDS cure.

Science

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AMP Study Explores Potency of Antibodies to Combat HIV Infection

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A clinical trial underway – known as the AMP study (for Antibody Meditated Prevention) – will determine whether infusing an experimental antibody (VRC01) into HIV-negative men and transgender individuals who have sex with men, will prevent the acquisition of HIV.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Vaccine, glycoprotein trimer, Immunology, Virology, rational vaccine design

TSRI Scientists Discover Antibodies that Target Holes in HIV’s Defenses

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A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that “holes” in HIV’s defensive sugar shield could be important in designing an HIV vaccine.

Medicine

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AIDS, Vaccine, antibody evolution, HIV, ImmunoGen, Antibody

TSRI and IAVI Researchers Harness Antibody Evolution on the Path to an AIDS Vaccine

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A series of new studies led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative describe a potential vaccination strategy to jump-start the selection and evolution of broadly effective antibodies to prevent HIV infection.

Medicine

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AIDS, Molecular Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Awards & Honors, Award Announcement

Case Western Reserve Researcher Awarded Drexel Prize in Translational Medicine

Dr. Jonathan Karn has been awarded the 2016 Drexel Prize in Translational Medicine by the Institute for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Disease at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

Medicine

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tuberculosis and HIV co-infection, people with tuberculosis and HIV, Tuberculosis, TB, HIV, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Mtb, active tuberculosis, active tb, latent tuberculosis, latent TB, TB therapy, HIV and Africa, HIV and TB in Africa, HIV and tuberculosis in Africa, Global Health

NIH Funds Research to Detect Tuberculosis Progression in People with HIV

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Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death worldwide among people infected with HIV. But as yet, no test can reliably show when latent (inactive) TB infections in people with HIV starts progressing to active—and potentially fatal—TB disease. Now, a researcher at Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received a five-year, $3.7 million National Institutes of Health grant to identify biomarkers that signal an increase in activity by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes TB, in people with HIV.

Medicine

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AIDS, HIV, Genetics, Immunology/Allergies/Asthma, Medicine And Health, Vaccines

Mutational Tug of War Over HIV's Disease-Inducing Potential

A study from Emory AIDS researchers shows how the expected disease severity when someone is newly infected by HIV reflects a balance between the virus' invisibility to the host's immune system and its ability to reproduce.

Medicine

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Industrial Engineering, Statistics, Cancer, HIV, AIDS, Pharmaceuticals

Professor Receives Funding to Improve Drug Manufacturing Processes

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Enrique del Castillo has been awarded $270,568 by the National Science Foundation to develop statistical methods that will improve the formulation and manufacturing of drugs used to treat some of the world’s deadliest diseases.

Medicine

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Sexual Satisfaction, Sub-Saharan Africa, HIVAIDS, World Gallup Poll, Religion, Income, Relationship

Sub-Saharan Africans Are Satisfied with Their Sex Lives

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People in Africa’s Sub-Sahara region, a relatively undeveloped area, are generally satisfied with their sex lives, with the most common rating — reported by 18 percent of survey respondents — being a perfect “10,” according to Baylor University research to be presented Monday, Aug. 22, at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Hiv Aids, Addiction, Sexual Behavior, Mental Health, Stress and Anxiety, Homelessness, Poverty, HIV risk behaviors, SRO housing, single room occupancy housing

Study Finds Better Definition of Homelessness May Help Minimize HIV Risk

Being homeless puts people at greater risk of HIV infection than those with stable housing, but targeting services to reduce risk behaviors is often complicated by fuzzy definitions of homelessness.

Medicine

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SUNY Downstate’s STAR Program Receives $1.9 Million to Expand HIV Prevention Services

Brooklyn, NY – SUNY Downstate Medical Center’s Special Treatment and Research (STAR) Program has been awarded $1.9 million in new grant funding from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to provide enhanced HIV prevention services throughout Brooklyn using the latest biomedical tools, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV (PEP).

Medicine

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Roadblocks to Research: UNC Bioethicist Addresses Lack of HIV Studies in Pregnant Women

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CHAPEL HILL, NC –UNC School of Medicine’s Anne Lyerly is addressing the urgent need for effective HIV prevention and treatment for the estimated 1.5 million women worldwide with HIV who give birth each year. Lyerly, associate director of the UNC Center for Bioethics and associate professor of social medicine at the UNC School of Medicine, is also an obstetrician/gynecologist who studies ethically complex clinical and policy issues related to women’s reproductive health.

Medicine

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HIV, healthcare for HIV-positive patients, HIV/AIDS in Central Africa, AIDS in Central Africa, HIV-positive patients in Central Africa, patients with HIV, anti-retroviral therapy, art, Central Africa International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (CA-IeDEA)

Einstein-Montefiore and CUNY Research Team Receives $9.4 Million to Lead Study of HIV/AIDS Care in Central Africa

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore, in collaboration with the City University of New York (CUNY), have received a $9.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to lead research in Central Africa to improve clinical care and health outcomes for patients with HIV. The ongoing, five-country observational study, called Central Africa International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (CA-IeDEA), involves more than 50,000 HIV-positive children and adults taking anti-retroviral therapy (ART).

Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, VNSNY CHOICE, HIV, New York City

VNSNY CHOICE SelectHealth Rewards Mount Sinai Health System for Management of Patients with HIV

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Mount Sinai Health System receives $420k for reducing HIV viral loads for VNSNY’s CHOICE SelectHealth Plan members

Medicine

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HIV, CRISPR, TTUHSC El Paso, Haoquan Wu, latent HIV, Virus, Gene Knock-out

Professor Receives Grant to Identify Genes That Keep HIV Latent

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One of the biggest challenges to discovering a cure for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is when the disease becomes dormant — hidden and inactive within the human body. Modern therapy can practically wipe out the virus, but stores of latent HIV soon become active and multiply all over again.

Medicine

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Robert Siliciano, HIV, antiretroviral therapies , art, polymerase chain reaction, Genome, Latent Reservoir, latent HIV

Dormant Copies of HIV Mostly Defective, New Study Shows

After fully sequencing the latent HIV “provirus” genomes from 19 people being treated for HIV, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that even in patients who start treatment very early, the only widely available method to measure the reservoir of dormant HIV in patients is mostly counting defective viruses that won’t cause harm, rather than those that can spring back into action and keep infections going.

Medicine

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HIV and AIDS, HIV, AIDS, Stigma, social stigma, Africa, Hiv Positive, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Africana studies, African studies, heterosexual men, Masculinity, me, S, Sickness, Disease, Nigeria, Hiv Testing, social context, HIV diagnosis, Public Health

HIV Stigma Influenced by Perceptions of Masculinity, Study Reveals

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Whether an HIV-positive man has met cultural expectations of masculinity might impact how much stigma he experiences, according to a new study from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Medicine

Science

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Basic Research, HIV and AIDS, Biophysics, Neutron Reflectometry, Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectroscopy, NEF, Biomedical Research, HIV

Researchers at Sandia, Northeastern Develop Method to Study Critical HIV Protein

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Mike Kent, a researcher in Sandia National Laboratories’ Biological and Engineering Sciences Center, is studying a protein called Nef involved in HIV progression to AIDS with the ultimate goal of blocking it. He and his collaborators have developed a new hybrid method to study this HIV protein that compromises the immune system. The method also could work on many other proteins that damage cellular processes and cause diseases.

Medicine

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First Next-Generation Sequencing Test for HIV Drug Resistance Could Help Combat AIDS Worldwide

Research announced today at the 68th AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo demonstrates that a first-of-its-kind next-generation sequencing test can detect HIV drug resistance mutations that conventional tests fail to identify. This test could play a critical role in helping clinicians to optimize HIV treatment regimens, while also helping public health initiatives to minimize the development of global resistance to antiretroviral drugs.







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