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An Ounce of Prevention: Research Advances on ‘Scourge’ of Transplant Wards

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The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year. It’s difficult to treat because fungi are genetically quite similar to humans, so compounds that affect fungi tend to have toxic side effects for patients. Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified 18 proteins that play a role in spore formation and germination. The findings raises the possibility of preventing the disease by blocking the spores’ germination.

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Health Surveillance Analysis Shows Service Members Diagnosed with HIV-1 Infection in Recent Years Remain Longer in U.S. Armed Forces

In a new analysis of military health surveillance data during 1990–2013, service members diagnosed with HIV-1 in more recent years have tended to remain on active duty longer than those who became infected in the earlier years of that time period.

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HIV Testing Among Older Adults Is Declining, Despite CDC Recommendation

In 2006 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that most doctors should automatically screen all their patients, including older adults, for HIV even if they don't exhibit any symptoms. New research finds that despite this recommendation, testing among older adults has largely fallen over time.

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Targeting HIV in Semen to Shut Down AIDS

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There may be two new ways to fight AIDS -- using a heat shock protein or a small molecule – to attack fibrils in semen associated with HIV during the initial phases of infection. HIV is most commonly transmitted in semen, which contains amyloid fibrils. These can increase the transmission of HIV by helping the it attach to the membrane surrounding human cells.

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Hepatitis C Infection May Fuel Heart Risk

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble.

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AIDS Research Prize for Warwick Academic

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A researcher at the University of Warwick has received international recognition for his contribution to AIDS research.

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High Rates of Violence, HIV Infection for Adolescents in Sex Trade on U.S.-Mexico Border

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that more than one in four female sex workers in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border entered the sex trade younger than age 18; one in eight before their 16th birthday. These women were more than three times more likely to become infected with HIV than those who started sex work as adults.

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Diversion of an HIV Vaccine Immune Response by Antibodies Reactive with Gut Microbiome

A recent HIV vaccine trial testing the HIV envelope as an immunogen was unsuccessful for protection against HIV infection. A new study has found that this vaccine selectively recruited antibodies reactive with both the HIV envelope and common intestinal microbes — a phenomenon previously reported by the same investigators to occur in the setting of acute HIV infection.

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TSRI Researcher Wins $4.5 Million in Grants to Support Development of AIDS Vaccine

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The Scripps Research Institute has been awarded two grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation totaling more than $4.5 million to fund new tools to collect and process high-resolution images of HIV proteins interacting with antibodies with goal to develop a vaccine against HIV/AIDS.

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New Target to Treat Depression, Sound Waves to Combat Tumors, and Improving Blood Vessels with Age, Top Stories 22 July 2015

Other topics include nursing research, treating hep C and HIV, and more

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New Drug Combination Treats Hepatitis C Patients Also Infected with HIV

Researchers at the University of California, School of Medicine found a new combination that effectively treats hepatitis C (HCV) patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV).

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New Study Finds Screening HIV Patients for Cryptococcal Antigen Saves Lives

The CrAg Lateral Flow Assay (LFA) a novel, rapid diagnostic test, is playing a crucial role in saving lives all over the world. The CrAg LFA tests for an infection called Cryptococcosis, which kills over 600,000 people every year, primarily in HIV/AIDS patients. Because of the ease-of-use and room temperature storage, the CrAg LFA, developed by IMMY, is the only test capable of bridging the gap between this disease and the life-saving medicine these patients need.

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New Evidence that Genetic Differences May Help Explain Inconsistent Effectiveness of Anti-HIV Drug

Research with human tissue and cells suggests that genetic variations, in addition to failure to comply with treatment regimens, may account for some failures of an anti-HIV drug to treat and prevent HIV infection.

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Scripps Research Institute-Designed Drug Candidate Significantly Reduces HIV Reactivation Rate

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Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown that, unlike other antiretroviral therapies, a natural compound called Cortistatin A establishes a near-permanent state of latency and greatly diminishing the HIV virus’ capacity for reactivation.

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Scientists Unravel Elusive Structure of HIV Protein

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HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus’ life cycle. Armed with this clearer image of the protein, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how the body can combat the virus with the ultimate aim of producing new and more effective antiviral drugs.

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Needle Exchanges Can Prevent More HIV Outbreaks Like One in Indiana

Congress needs to immediately lift the ban on federal funding for needle exchange programs to counter the threat of HIV outbreaks among injection drug users like the one that has seen an alarming number of new cases erupt in a single rural Indiana county.

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PrEP Data Links Anti-HIV Immune Response to Reduce Chance of Infection

Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that some individuals exposed to HIV-1, but who remain uninfected, have a certain pattern of virus-specific immune responses that differentiated them from individuals who became infected.

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UCLA Research Offers More Evidence for Possible Link Between Cocaine Use and HIV Infection

New research offers further evidence that cocaine use disrupts the immune system, making people who use it more likely to become infected with HIV.

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Team Shows AIDS Vaccine Candidate Successfully ‘Primes’ Immune System

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New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative and The Rockefeller University shows in mice that an experimental vaccine candidate designed at TSRI can stimulate the immune system activity necessary to stop HIV infection.

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Changes in HIV Genetic Code Determine Severity of Disease

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In a finding that furthers the understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), researchers from Children’s Hospital Los Angeles discovered two locations where a single difference in HIV’s genetic code altered the way the virus infected the cell, thereby influencing the progression of the disease.