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Long-Acting Drug Effectively Prevents HIV-Like Infection in Monkeys

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A regime of anti-HIV drugs — components of regimens to treat established HIV infection — has the potential to protect against infection in the first place. But real life can interfere; the effectiveness of this prophylactic approach declines if the medications aren’t taken as prescribed.

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Human Mode Of Responding To HIV Vaccine Is Conserved From Monkeys

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The antibody response from an HIV vaccine trial in Thailand was made possible by a genetic trait carried over in humans from an ancient ancestry with monkeys and apes, according to a study led by Duke Medicine researchers.

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Awakening Cells’ Killer Instinct: Scientists Train Immune System to Spot and Destroy Cure-Defying Mutant HIV

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Luring dormant HIV out of hiding and destroying its last cure-defying holdouts has become the holy grail of HIV eradication, but several recent attempts to do so have failed. Now the findings of a Johns Hopkins-led study reveal why that is and offer a strategy that could form a blueprint for a therapeutic vaccine to eradicate lingering virus from the body.

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Loyola Offers Patients Free HIV Testing

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Loyola University Health System has now expanded free HIV testing to patients at the Loyola Center for Health at River Forest. “HIV affects people of all ages, all races and all economic backgrounds; it is not just an urban phenomenon but exists in the suburbs,” says Jerry Goldstein, research coordinator, Loyola University Health System. ”The more people tested, the earlier the detection and the faster treatment is offered to save lives and prevent the spread of infection.”

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Combining Social Media and Behavioral Psychology Could Lead to More HIV Testing

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Social media such as Twitter and Facebook, combined with behavioral psychology, could be a valuable tool in the fight against AIDS by prompting high-risk individuals to be tested.

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Hepatitis C Ruled Out as Cause of Mental Impairment in HIV Patients

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Secondary infection with the hepatitis C virus does not contribute to the mental impairments seen in many long-term survivors of HIV infection, a new study reveals.

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Geospatial Study Identifies Hotspots in Deaths From HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C in Massachusetts

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A new retrospective study by epidemiologists at Tufts finds significant geographic disparities in HIV and hepatitis C related mortality in Massachusetts from 2002-2011. The study, published in PLOS ONE, used geospatial techniques to identify hotspots and coldspots in the state.

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People with Mental Illness More Likely To Be Tested for HIV

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People with mental illness are more likely to have been tested for HIV than those without mental illness, according to a new study from a team of researchers at Penn Medicine and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published online this week in AIDS Patient Care and STDs. The researchers also found that the most seriously ill – those with schizophrenia and bipolar disease – had the highest rate of HIV testing.

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How to Stop the Spread of HIV in Africa

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To stop the spread of HIV in Africa, researchers at UCLA, using a complex mathematical model, have developed a strategy that focuses on targeting “hot zones,” areas where the risk of HIV infection is much higher than the national average.

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Sophisticated HIV Diagnostics Adapted for Remote Areas

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Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1.