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Combining Social Media and Behavioral Psychology Could Lead to More HIV Testing

Social media such as Twitter and Facebook, combined with behavioral psychology, could be a valuable tool in the fight against AIDS by prompting high-risk individuals to be tested.

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Hepatitis C Ruled Out as Cause of Mental Impairment in HIV Patients

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Secondary infection with the hepatitis C virus does not contribute to the mental impairments seen in many long-term survivors of HIV infection, a new study reveals.

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Geospatial Study Identifies Hotspots in Deaths From HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C in Massachusetts

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A new retrospective study by epidemiologists at Tufts finds significant geographic disparities in HIV and hepatitis C related mortality in Massachusetts from 2002-2011. The study, published in PLOS ONE, used geospatial techniques to identify hotspots and coldspots in the state.

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People with Mental Illness More Likely To Be Tested for HIV

People with mental illness are more likely to have been tested for HIV than those without mental illness, according to a new study from a team of researchers at Penn Medicine and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published online this week in AIDS Patient Care and STDs. The researchers also found that the most seriously ill – those with schizophrenia and bipolar disease – had the highest rate of HIV testing.

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How to Stop the Spread of HIV in Africa

To stop the spread of HIV in Africa, researchers at UCLA, using a complex mathematical model, have developed a strategy that focuses on targeting “hot zones,” areas where the risk of HIV infection is much higher than the national average.

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Sophisticated HIV Diagnostics Adapted for Remote Areas

Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1.

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World AIDS Day, December 1: McGill/MUHC Experts

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Research Shows Anti-HIV Medicines Can Cause Damage to Fetal Hearts

Just-published findings in the journal AIDS raise concern about potential long-term harmful impact of “antiretroviral therapy” on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves.

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HIV/AIDS Drugs Could Be Repurposed to Treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration

A landmark study published today in the journal Science by an international group of scientists, led by the laboratory of Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, professor and vice chair of the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky, reports that HIV/AIDS drugs that have been used for the last 30 years could be repurposed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD), as well as other inflammatory disorders, because of a previously undiscovered intrinsic and inflammatory activity those drugs possess.

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A Palliative Caregiver for Young Lives Cut Short

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In the 1980s, when HIV/AIDS was a new, mysterious and inevitably fatal illness, Dr. James Oleske of what is new Rutgers New Jersey Medical School earned renown for caring for children who would inevitably die from AIDS, and for uncovering some of its important secrets. With HIV under much better control, Oleske has now turned his attention to being a champion of palliative care for children who are terribly ill with other fatal conditions.

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