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As HIV Patients Live Longer, Updated Guide Helps Them Navigate New Territory

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HIV is Still Growing, Even When Undetectable in the Blood

Scientists found HIV is still replicating in lymphoid tissue, even when it is undetectable in the blood of patients on antiretroviral drugs. The findings provide a critical new perspective on how HIV persists in the body despite potent antiretroviral therapy. They also offer a path to a cure and show the importance delivering drugs at effective concentrations where the virus continues to replicate in the patients.

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HIV Protein Manipulates Hundreds of Human Genes to Advance Progression Into AIDS, UT Southwestern Study Shows

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UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have deciphered how a small protein made by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS manipulates human genes to further its deadly agenda.

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Most Commonly Used TB Test Fails to Accurately Diagnose Pregnant HIV + Women

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New research finds that the most commonly used test for tuberculosis fails to accurately diagnose TB in up to 50 percent of pregnant women who are HIV+. The research published early online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine is believed to be the first study to compare the accuracy of two TB tests – the Quantiferon Gold In Tube® blood test and the more commonly used TST or tuberculin skin test—in this population. The study “Quantitative IFN-, IL-2 Response and Latent Tuberculosis Test Discordance in HIV-infected Pregnant Women” is also the first study to examine pregnancy’s effect on the body’s response to TB.

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Finding the Missing Piece: Scientists Overcome Missing Data and Demonstrate Effectiveness of Anti-Retroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Infants

Scientists from The Wistar Institute, in collaboration with the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale University, have demonstrated that the issue of missing data can be successfully overcome using appropriate statistical methods, and as a result, they were able to show how early initiation of ART in infants preserves an expansion of naïve T-cells and allows the infant’s immune system to be properly reconstructed.

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Can We Improve Acceptance of HIV Testing?

How you ask is a critical part of the process and crucial to providing patient centered care.

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Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) as Safe as Aspirin

The researchers reviewed major studies of both PrEP for HIV prevention and aspirin for heart attack prevention. They found that both had similar low rates of serious side effects. Aspirin users rarely had serious bleeding or death and PrEP users rarely had serious kidney or bone damage.

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Disparity Lies at Intersection of HIV, Hodgkin Lymphoma

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Among HIV-positive patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, a new study finds that blacks are significantly less likely than whites to receive treatment for the cancer, even though chemotherapy saves lives.

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UAB Studying Impact of Ketogenic Diet on Cognition in Older Adults with HIV

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A new pilot study led by Shannon Morrison, Ph.D., is exploring the effects of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet with adequate protein in older persons living with HIV.

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The Leonard C. Goodman Institute for Investigative Reporting Is Now Accepting Submissions

The deadline for this round of proposals is January 15, 2016. Candidates will be notified of decisions by the end of February 2016. The Institute pays a competitive rate--and covers expenses--for investigative reporting that advances social and economic justice. All stories are published in In These Times magazine and on InTheseTimes.com.

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In Pursuit of AIDS Vaccine, TSRI Scientists Shed Light on Antibody Origins

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In a new study, a team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute tracked how a family of these HIV-fighting antibodies develops over time. The research shows how a future vaccine might trigger the immune system to produce these antibodies more effectively.

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Top Stories 11 Dec 2015; New Forensic Science Breakthroughs, Breast Cancer Treatment Difference by Age, Racial Disparities in Dialysis, and More...

Click to view today's top stories.

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Harm Reduction Services Less Available in Areas Plagued by Rising IV Drug Use and HIV Infections

Access to harm reduction programs such as syringe exchange is lowest in rural and suburban areas, where rates of addiction to heroin and other opioids are on the rise, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Have Sex Workers in Puerto Rico Revealed an Important Connection Between Semen Exposure and HIV Resistance?

In newly published research, scientists at The Wistar Institute show that continued semen exposure in sex workers sustains changes in the cervical and vaginal microenvironment that may actually increase HIV-1 resistance. This information may lead the way to better preventative strategies that block the transmission of the virus and improved designs for future HIV vaccine studies that can monitor the described changes when recruiting sex workers into vaccine trials.

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How Cells Are Foiled by a Herpesvirus Family Member in the Virus-Host Arms Race

Not every virus wants to go viral — at least, not immediately. Some want to slip in quietly. Hide. Wait for the perfect opportunity to attack. In order to do so, the virus has to find a way to enter the cells of the human body without tripping the alarm, and stay there without notice. It’s how HIV works, and also how viruses in the herpesvirus family, like human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), do their business.

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Montefiore AIDS Center and Addiction Medicine Expert Is Honored on World AIDS Day, December 1

NEW YORK (December 1, 2015)— Today, the New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute (NYSDOH) will honor the Montefiore AIDS Center staff for their work in the field of HIV/AIDS and Alain Litwin M.D. for his contributions to the field of hepatitis C (HCV). New York is home to approximately 116,000 people living with HIV or AIDS. Additionally, an estimated 200,000 New Yorkers have chronic hepatitis C, which like HIV, can be acquired by contact with blood.

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U of S Researchers Hope to Harness Human DNA to Fight HIV

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Linda Chelico and her team are learning more about how an ancient “error correction” system in the human genome helps protect the body against HIV.

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Do You Know Your HIV Status?

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Loyola offers HIV testing to all ED patients. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), of the 1.2 million Americans living with AIDS, one in eight do not know they are infected. To raise awareness for the importance of this potentially deadly infectious disease, December 1 is World AIDS Day.

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Taking Truvada “as Needed” Can Prevent HIV-Transmission Amongst People at High-Risk

In a study into the prevention of HIV transmission, people who took the antiretroviral drug Truvada were 86% less likely to contract the disease than those who took a placebo, report the researchers who led the study.

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A Cheap, Disposable Device for Diagnosing Disease

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A reusable microfluidic device for sorting and manipulating cells and other micro/nano meter scale objects will make biomedical diagnosis of diseases cheaper and more convenient.