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Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, social media

Twitter’s Role in the Fight Against HIV

Penn Medicine's look at big data in health care continues, with a new post on what Twitter and communication “in the wild” can reveal about HIV.

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HIV Therapy Could Be Contributing to Syphilis Outbreak

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Drugs used to treat HIV could affect how the body responds to syphilis, inadvertently contributing to a current outbreak, a new study suggests.

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Parents Struggle with When to Keep Kids Home Sick From School; Experts on Peanut Allergies Weigh In on New Guidelines; A Better Way to Test for Jaundice, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

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What Does it Take for an AIDS Virus to Infect a Person?

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Hahn and colleagues examined the characteristics of HIV-1 strains that were successful in traversing the genital mucosa that forms a boundary to entry by viruses and bacteria. Studying viral isolates from the blood and genital secretions of eight chronically HIV-1 infected donors and their matched recipients, the researchers identified a sub-population of HIV-1 strains with biological properties that predispose them to establish new infections more efficiently.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Lgbt, PREP, pre-exposure prophylaxis, Guidelines, CDC, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Truvada, tenofovir disoproxil-emtricitabine, Prevention, men who have sex with men, MSM

CDC guidelines for HIV prevention regimen may not go far enough, study suggests

Study suggests that CDC guidelines for who should be on Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) don’t go far enough because current standards could miss some people who should be on it. Working with the Los Angeles LGBT Center, UCLA-led researchers developed an online PrEP risk calculator that may fill that gap.

Medicine

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Arik Marcell, Young Men, Males, Sex, gay, Sexual, Health, Reproductive, Barriers, HIV, STI

Study Identifies Barriers to Sexual Health Among Male Teens and Young Men

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Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population’s use of sexual and reproductive health care.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Interferon Type I, CD4 T cell, Immune activation, Helper T Cells, Cd8 T Cells

Protein That Activates Immune Response Harms Body’s Ability to Fight HIV

In findings they call counterintuitive, a team of UCLA-led researchers suggests that blocking a protein, which is crucial to initiating the immune response against viral infections, may actually help combat HIV.

Medicine

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Northwestern University, HIV, Heart, Heart Attack

HIV Patients Have Nearly Twice the Heart Attack Risk

Current methods to predict the risk of heart attack and stroke vastly underestimate the risk in individuals with HIV, which is nearly double that of the general population, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. “The actual risk of heart attack for people with HIV was roughly 50 percent higher than predicted by the risk calculator many physicians use for the general population,” said first author Dr.

Medicine

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Whitehead Institute, MIT, Broad Institute, HIV, CRISP/Cas9, Biology

CRISPR Screening Identifies Potential HIV Treatment Targets

Targeting human genes required for HIV infection but not T cell survival may avoid inducing treatment resistance

Medicine

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HIV Biomedical

O’Neill Institute Experts, NMAC Release HIV Biomedical Prevention Report

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HIV policy experts have released the first of two reports to help prevent HIV in communities of color.

Medicine

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HIV-Positive Transplant, Kidney Transplant, Kidney Transplants, Kidney Transplantation, HIV, HOPE Act, HIV-Positive to HIV-Positive Transplant, Dialysis, Nephrology, Nephrologist, Organ Donation, deceased donor, HIV Deceased Donor

UAB Performs Deep South’s First HIV-Positive Kidney Transplant From HIV-Positive Deceased Donor

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Mississippi man transplanted at UAB is only the eighth HIV-positive to HIV-positive transplant recipient in the United States since implementation of the HOPE Act.

Science

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Statistics, Population, Public Health, boostrapping, Sociology, Addiction, HIV

Studies of Vulnerable Populations Get a 'Bootstrapped' Boost From Statisticians

In a paper published online Dec. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Washington researchers report on a statistical approach called "tree bootstrapping" can help social scientists study hard-to-reach populations like drug users.

Medicine

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HIV, Hepatitis C, Sovaldi, Harvoni, Biomedical Science, Pharmacetical

Bad Combination: Hepatitis C and HIV Medications Can Interact Adversely When Used Together

University of Rhode Island pharmacy professor has discovered potential complications when Hepatitis C and HIV drugs are used in combination with additional medications to combat co-infections.

Medicine

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HIV, Medication Adherence, Youth, Intervention, Text Messaging, Adolescent, Evidence Based

Text Messaging Improves Medication Use by HIV-Positive Youth

A randomized clinical trial published in AIDS and Behavior showed that personalized two-way daily text messaging improved adherence to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive youth ages 16-29. The HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Synthesis (PRS) project at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified this intervention as meeting criteria for good evidence of efficacy.

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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HIV Acquisition, Hetrosexual, Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, CDUHR, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing

NYU Researchers Examine Most Efficacious Social/Behavioral Interventions to Uncover Undiagnosed HIV

At least a third of new HIV transmission events are linked to those with undiagnosed HIV. Researchers looked to identify best approaches to uncovering undiagnosed HIV, comparing the efficacy of three social/behavioral intervention strategies for heterosexual individuals at high risk for HIV in Brooklyn, NY. Active approaches to detect undiagnosed HIV among heterosexuals are needed to achieve elimination of HIV transmission in the U.S.; the study addresses this gap in available HIV prevention programs.

Medicine

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Janice Clements, Lucio Gama, HIV, AIDS, simian immunodeficiency virus, SIV, shoot and kill, Brain, Virus, macaques

'Shock and Kill' Strategy for Curing HIV May Endanger Patients' Brains

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Combination drug treatments have become successful at long-term control of HIV infection, but the goal of totally wiping out the virus and curing patients has so far been stymied by HIV's ability to hide out in cells and become dormant for long periods of time.

Science

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Nanomedicine, Hiv Prevention, Truvada, nanochannels, Drug Delivery, space nanomedicine

Houston Methodist Receives Award for Implantable HIV Drug Delivery Device

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The Houston Methodist Research Institute’s department of nanomedicine is the recipient of this year’s AIDS Foundation Houston Shelby Hodge Vision Award. Alessandro Grattoni, Ph.D., nanomedicine department chair at the Houston Methodist Research Institute, accepted the award during the World AIDS Day luncheon.

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Today Is World AIDS Day. Find the Latest Resources and Experts on the AIDS Epidemic in the AIDS and HIV News Source

Today is World AIDS Day. Find the latest resources and experts on the AIDS epidemic in the AIDS and HIV News Source

Science

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Methadone Treatment, Methadone, drug abuse treatment, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, African American

Lower-Than-Recommended Methadone Doses for Opiate Addiction Are More Likely at Facilities Managed by African-American Directors, Johns Hopkins Study Shows

While the daily dose of methadone for opiate addiction has declined in recent years, facilities run by African-American directors were more likely to provide low methadone doses than facilities run by managers of other races and ethnicities.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, 1917 clinic, Center for AIDS Research, Cfar, World Aids Day, AIDS Clinical Trials Group, HIV, HIVAIDS, Hiv Aids, AIDS, Global

UAB Celebrates World AIDS Day 2016 and 30 Years of Research in the Clinical Trials Network

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Three decades of clinical trials have changed the face of HIV/AIDS.







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