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Article ID: 696533

Dynamic Modeling Helps Predict the Behaviors of Gut Microbes

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A new study provides a platform for predicting how microbial gut communities work and represents a first step toward understanding how to manipulate the properties of the gut ecosystem. This could allow scientists to, for example, design a probiotic that persists in the gut or tailor a diet to positively influence human health.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696530

‘Flamingo’: High-Powered Microscopy Coming to a Scientist Near You

University of Wisconsin-Madison

A team at the University of Wisconsin has developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope — an engineering feat that shrinks a tabletop-sized technology down to the weight and dimensions of a suitcase packed for a week’s vacation. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge Institute for Research engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.

Released:
22-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
28-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jun-2018 9:05 AM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Embargo will expire:
25-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
22-Jun-2018 7:05 AM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Embargo will expire:
28-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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Article ID: 696491

Deep Data Dive Helps Predict Cerebral Palsy

University of Delaware

A pioneering technique developed to analyze genetic activity of Antarctic worms is helping to predict cerebral palsy. The technique uses next-generation genetic sequencing data to measure how cells control the way genes are turned on or off, and can also be used in other human health care research.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 3:45 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696474

New Cellular Pathway Helps Explain How Inflammation Leads to Artery Disease

Cedars-Sinai

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696467

Scripps Research study provides new clues to improving chemotherapies

Scripps Research Institute

The microbiome may harbor a gene for drug resistance

Released:
21-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696363

Dying Cancer Cells Make Remaining Glioblastoma Cells More Aggressive and Therapy-Resistant

University of Alabama at Birmingham

A surprising event promotes global changes in glioblastoma. Dying, apoptotic cancer cells release extracellular vesicles that carry components to alter RNA splicing in the recipient glioblastoma cells, and this increases their aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696386

Scientists Discover New Gene Expression Mechanism with Possible Role in Human Disease

University of North Carolina Health Care System

University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6 facilitates RNA degradation so that cells have just the right amount of RNA for the creation of proteins, a key component to human health and the avoidance of disease.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 1:45 PM EDT
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