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genetic

Landmark Genetic Interaction Map Reveals the Networks of Cellular Life

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A global genetic interaction map is revolutionizing how genes are being studied. A new study is no longer looking at genes as loners, but instead as a social network of the body, interacting in groups. The new approach may ultimately change our understanding of the genetic roots of diseases.

Medicine

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pembrolizumab, Keytruda, Head And Neck Cancer, Metastatic Cancer, burtness

Pembrolizumab Approval Is Tip of the Iceberg for Immunotherapy in HNSCC

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Immunotherapy is a big change for head and neck cancer and there seems to be no doubt that there is activity for immunotherapies with pembrolizumab as well as nivolumab [Opdivo]” said Burtness, professor of Medicine at Yale Cancer Center.

Science

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Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), HHMI faculty scholar, HHMI, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Fred Hutch, Gary Gilliland, Jesse Bloom, Frederick "Erick" Matsen, Evolutionary Biology, Computational Biology, Simons Foundation, Bill & Melina Gates Foundation

Fred Hutch Researchers Jesse Bloom and Frederick Matsen Selected as Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholars

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Drs. Jesse Bloom and Frederick “Erick” Matsen, evolutionary researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, were named Faculty Scholars today by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Simons Foundation. This honor comes with five years of unrestricted philanthropic support for these two scientists, both of whom focus on developing methods for understanding evolution, especially the evolution of pathogens and immune resistance.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Sep-2016 3:00 PM EDT

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American Society of Human Genetics, Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic Biomedical Ethics Program

American Society of Human Genetics and Mayo Clinic Launch Educational Collaboration

BETHESDA, Md., and ROCHESTER, Minn. — The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) and Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine (CIM) announced today a formal collaboration under which the two organizations will facilitate the use of genomics in medicine through the education of health professionals.

Science

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Mitochondria, Proteins, Yeast, Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, Chemistry, Metabolism, Biochemistry

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Sep-2016 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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One Single Biopsy Not Sufficient to Guide Treatment Decisions in Prostate Cancer

Molecular composition of multiple tumors shows genomic differences.

Science

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HHMI, Cancer, Cell Biology

HCI Scientist Receives $1M Award to Fund Cancer Research

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Jody Rosenblatt, Ph.D., a cell biologist at Huntsman Cancer Institute and an associate professor of oncological sciences at the University of Utah has been selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Faculty Scholar, HHMI announced today. The award provides $1 million to fund her research over the course of five years.

Science

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Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Immunotherapy, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Moon Shots Program, Sharma, Ipilimumab

Melanoma Tumors Use Interferon-Gamma Mutations to Fight Immunotherapy

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Melanoma tumors use genetic mutations in a prominent immune response pathway to resist the immunotherapy ipilimumab, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cell.

Medicine

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ALS, Motor Neurons, Biochemistry & Biophysics, Lou Gehrig's Disease

New ALS Discovery: Scientists Reverse Protein Clumping Involved in Neurodegenerative Conditions

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine announced the first evidence that stabilizing a protein called SOD1 can help reverse protein clumping in the types of neurons affected by the fatal neurodegenerative condition Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Science

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eLife, Fralin Life Science Institute, Virginia Tech, Mosquito, zika, Dengue Fever, Malaria, Vector Borne Diseases, genetic, Gene

Virginia Tech Researcher Finds Gene That Reduces Female Mosquitoes

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Zhijian “Jake” Tu and colleagues found that placing a particular Y chromosome gene on the autosomes of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes — a species responsible for transmitting malaria — killed off 100 percent of all female embryos that inherited this gene.

Medicine

Science

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Immunotherapy, Treg cells, Autoimmune Disease, Gastrointestinal Cancers

Ludwig Study Exposes Key Requirement for Regulatory T Cell Function

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. The findings also unravel the complex role these cells can play in the genesis and progression of certain gastrointestinal cancers.

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Progesterone Promotes Healing in the Lung After a Bout of Flu

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Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. A study published on Sept. 15th in PLOS Pathogens reports that treatment with progesterone protects female mice against the consequences of influenza infection by reducing inflammation and improving pulmonary function, primarily through upregulation of amphiregulin in lung cells.

Medicine

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Cirm, California Institute For Regenerative Medicine, University of California at San Diego, UCSD, Stem Cell, Stem Cell Research, C. Randal Mills, Ph.D., Cystonisis, Blood Stem Cells, Stephanie Cherqui, FDA, Food And Drug Administration, Cysteine

Rare, Life-Threatening Childhood Disease is the Focus of CIRM’s Most Recent Investment

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. Current treatments are limited, which is why the CIRM Board today approved $5.2 million for research that holds the possibility of a safe, effective, one-time life-long treatment.

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Bile Acid Uptake Inhibitor Prevents NASH/Fatty Liver in Mice

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. The findings suggest that these drugs, known as ASBT inhibitors, could be a viable clinical strategy to address NASH, an increasingly common liver disease. The results are scheduled for publication in Science Translational Medicine on September 21, 2016.

Medicine

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Immunotherapy, Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Natural Killer Cells

New Immunotherapy for Leukemia Shows Promise in Small Clinical Trial

'Training' immune cells boosts effectiveness in patients with AML

Medicine

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Stem Cells, Animal Research, Animal Studies, Heart, Heart Cells, Medicine

Stem Cell ‘Heart Patch’ Moves Closer to Clinic

The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional “heart patches” in a large animal model — the last big hurdle before trials in human patients.

Medicine

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Tecfidera, dimethyl fumarate, multiple sclerosis, DMF, MS, Mechanism Of Action, T Cell, Immunology, Drug Development, Chemical Biology

TSRI Study Illuminates How Mystery MS Drug Works

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A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera®. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious.

Medicine

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Sickle Cell Disease, Sickle Cell Awareness Month, Jane Hankins, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Clinical health application, Hydroxyurea

New Mobile Health App Will Help Sickle Cell Patients Stay Healthy

National Institutes of Health funding will allow physicians and researchers to help sickle cell patients in Memphis and surrounding communities improve access and adherence to hydroxyurea treatment

Medicine

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Prostate Cancer, liquid biopsy, cancer biopsy, Circulating Tumor Cells

Duke Team Identifies Blood Biomarkers in Drug-Resistant Cancer Tumor Cells

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While searching for a non-invasive way to detect prostate cancer cells circulating in blood, Duke Cancer Institute researchers have identified some blood markers associated with tumor resistance to two common hormone therapies.







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