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Trial of Telomerase Inhibitors Points to Lasting Treatments for Myeloproliferative Disorders

A multinational team of physicians and scientists from City of Hope, the San Francisco Bay area and Europe recently reported success of a phase II clinical trial of a novel drug against essential thrombocythemia (ET), one of three myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs).

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Scientists See Motor Neurons ‘Walking’ in Real Time

The new approach shows how cells in the spinal cord synchronize many neurons at once to allow complex movements, which could have implications for treating spinal cord injuries and diseases

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Flu Study, on Hold, Yields New Vaccine Technology

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Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using technology described today (Sept. 2) by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the journal Nature Communications.

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Cellular Recycling Complexes May Hold Key to Chemotherapy Resistance

Upsetting the balance between protein synthesis, misfolding, and degradation drives cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent cancer treatments take advantage of this knowledge with a class of drugs that block protein degradation, known as proteasome inhibitors. Widespread resistance to these drugs limits their success, but Whitehead researchers have discovered a potential Achilles heel in resistance. With such understandings researchers may be able to target malignancy broadly, and more effectively.

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Assessing Bacteria Growth Rate Gives Novel Insight into Health and Microbiome

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Investigating how the microbiome impacts human health, the labs of Dr. Eran Elinav and Prof. Eran Segal at the Weizmann Institute of Science took a fresh approach: measuring the growth rate of the bacteria. The findings led Dr. Elinav to say, “microbial growth rate reveals things about our health that cannot be seen with any other analysis method.”

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Study Shows K17 Protein Promotes Cancer

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Keratin 17 (K17), a protein previously believed to provide only mechanical support for cancer cells, appears to play a crucial role in degrading a key tumor suppressor protein in cancer cells named p27. This finding, published in the September 1 issue of Cancer Research, is based on the work of researchers in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. They found that K17 has the ability to enter the nucleus of cancer cells, leading to the degradation of p27. The work illustrates for the first time that a keratin can function to promote the development of cancer. Furthermore, the paper details that tumors with high levels of K17 are biologically more aggressive and have a worse prognosis than low K17 tumors.

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Global Team Seeks Individual X-ray Portraits of Active Viruses, Bacteria and Cell Components

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A major international collaboration launched by the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is laying the technical groundwork for taking individual, atomic-scale portraits of intact viruses, living bacteria and other microscopic samples using the brightest X-ray light on Earth.

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Yeast Study Yields Insights Into Cell-Division Cycle

Studies using yeast genetics have provided new, fundamental insights into the cell-division cycle, researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute report.

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Top Stories 1 September 2015

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Scientists Create Designer Proteins That Control Enzyme Activity

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Scientists have developed a novel approach to control the activity of enzymes through the use of synthetic, antibody-like proteins known as monobodies. The findings have widespread implications for a broad range of industrial, scientific and medical applications in which enzymes are used.