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For Important Tumor-Suppressing Protein, Context Is Key

Berkeley Lab scientists have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. As with many things in life, they found that context makes a big difference.

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Life's Extremists May Be an Untapped Source of Antibacterial Drugs

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Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.

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Cohesin: A Cherry-Shaped Molecule Safeguards Cell-Division

The cohesin molecule ensures the proper distribution of DNA during cell division. Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna can now prove the concept of its carabiner-like function by visualizing for the first time the open form of the complex. The journal SCIENCE publishes the new findings in its current issue.

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Signaling Molecule Crucial to Stem Cell Reprogramming

While investigating a rare genetic disorder, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a ubiquitous signaling molecule is crucial to cellular reprogramming, a finding with significant implications for stem cell-based regenerative medicine, wound repair therapies and potential cancer treatments.

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Salk Scientists Unveil Powerful Method to Speed Cancer Drug Discovery

The new method lets researchers identify weak and previously undetectable interactions between proteins inside living cells

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Penn Researchers Unwind the Mysteries of the Cellular Clock

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Underlying circadian rhythms is a clock built of transcription factors that control the oscillation of genes, serving as the wheels and springs of the clock. But, how does a single clock keep time in multiple phases at once? A genome-wide survey found that circadian genes and regulatory elements called enhancers oscillate daily in phase with nearby genes – both the enhancer and gene activity peak at the same time each day.

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Fat a Culprit in Fibrotic Lung Damage

Researchers debate whether the lung tissue in pulmonary fibrosis is directly damaged, or whether immune cells initiate the scarring process – an important distinction when trying to find new ways to battle the disease. Now research shows that both processes may be important, and suggest a new direction for developing novel therapies.

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Researchers Characterize a Protein Mutation That Alters Tissue Development in Males Before Birth

Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a protein mutation that alters specific gender-related tissue in males before birth and can contribute to cancer and other less life-threatening challenges. The findings appear in the November 21 edition of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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Cells’ Natural Response to Chronic Protein Misfolding May Do More Harm than Good

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Protein misfolding” diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer’s may be seriously exacerbated by the body’s own response against that misfolding, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute.

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Pumping Zinc

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Dr. Maya Schuldiner’s lab has identified an unusual cellular mechanism – a two-part zinc pump – that is faulty in some types of Alzheimer’s. While it’s not yet clear how the finding links to Alzheimer’s, it does offer new directions for investigating the causes of the disease.

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