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Blocking a Fork in the Road to DNA Replication

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It’s a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.

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UCLA Gene Discovery Shows How Stem Cells Can Be Activated to Help Immune System Respond to Infection

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UCLA scientists show that two genes not previously known to be involved with the immune system play an active role in directing stem cells to fight infection

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Why Plants Don't Get Sunburn

Plants rely on sunlight to make their food, but they also need protection from its harmful rays, just like humans do. Recently, scientists discovered a group of molecules in plants that shields them from sun damage. Now, in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, one team reports on the mechanics of how these natural plant sunscreens work.

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Researchers Identify Potential Target for Treating Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

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KU Cancer Center researchers have identified a protein that could prevent metastasis and recurrence of breast cancer.

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Blood Vessel Growth in the Brain Relies on a Protein Found in Tumor Blood Vessels

Fourteen years ago, several genes were discovered that are more active in tumor-associated blood vessels than in normal blood vessels. New research now reveals the normal function of one of those genes and suggests it could be a good target for anticancer drug therapy.

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Study Gives New View On How Cells Control What Comes In And Out

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A common protein plays a different role than previously thought in the opening and closing of channels that let ions flow in and out of our cells, researchers at Johns Hopkins report. Those channels are critical to life, as having the right concentrations of sodium and calcium ions in cells enables healthy brain communication, heart contraction and many other processes. The new study reveals that a form of calmodulin long thought to be dormant actually opens these channels wide. The finding is likely to bring new insight into disorders caused by faulty control of these channels, such as cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease, the researchers say.

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How Cells Know Which Way to Go

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Amoebas aren’t the only cells that crawl: Movement is crucial to development, wound healing and immune response in animals, not to mention cancer metastasis. In two new studies from Johns Hopkins, researchers answer long-standing questions about how complex cells sense the chemical trails that show them where to go — and the role of cells’ internal “skeleton” in responding to those cues.

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New Compounds Reduce Debilitating Inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation in diseases such as ulcerative colitis and arthritis. The compounds appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. These findings appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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A New Dent in HIV-1’s Armor

Salk scientists identify a promising target for HIV/AIDS treatment

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New Microscope Collects Dynamic Images of the Molecules That Animate Life

A new imaging platform developed by Eric Betzig and colleagues at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus offers another leap forward for light microscopy. The new technology collects high-resolution images rapidly and minimizes damage to cells, meaning it can image the three-dimensional activity of molecules, cells, and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than was previously possible. Betzig was one of three scientists who shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry earlier this month.

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