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GBSI, Global Biological Standards Institute , Leonard P. Freedman, PhD, Reproducibility2020, Reproducible, AAAS Annual Meeting, NIH, Standards

GBSI Report Shows Encouraging Progress Towards Addressing Reproducibility to Significantly Improve Quality of Preclinical Biological Research by Year 2020

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One year after the Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) issued its Reproducibility2020 challenge and action plan for the biomedical research community, the organization reports encouraging progress toward the goal to significantly improve the quality of preclinical biological research by year 2020. “Reproducibility2020 Report: Progress and Priorities,” posted today on bioRxiv, identifies action and impact that has been achieved by the life science research community and outlines priorities going forward. The report is the first comprehensive review of the steps being taken to improve reproducibility since the issue became more widely known in 2012.

Medicine

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T Cell, Vaccination

Penn Team Tracks Rare T Cells in Blood to Better Understand Annual Flu Vaccine

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A team has found a way to identify the small population of circulating helper T cells present in the blood after an annual flu vaccine to monitor their contribution to antibody strength. A technique that identifies these helper immune cells could inform future vaccine design, especially for vulnerable populations.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Stem Cell Therapy, Regeneration Of Hair Cells, Deafness

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST

Medicine

Science

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cell’s nucleus, imaging technology

Researchers Are First to See DNA 'Blink'

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Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA “blink,” or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer. Vadim Backman will discuss the technology and its applications -- including the new concept of macrogenomics, a technology aiming to regulate the global patterns of gene expression without gene editing -- at the 2017 AAAS annual meeting.

Medicine

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Stem Cells Collected From Fat May Have Use in Anti-Aging Treatments

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Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells – such as fibroblasts from the skin – and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells.

Medicine

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Cancer, Leukemia, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, FLT3, RUNX1

Tumor Suppressor Promotes Some Acute Myeloid Leukemias, Study Reveals

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Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, “RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,” which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

Science

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Tissue Engineering, Nervous System, Intestinal, Diabetes

Researchers Engineer Intestinal Tissue with Functioning Nervous System

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For the first time, NIH-funded researchers have used stem cells to grow intestinal tissues with a functioning nervous system. The advance creates new opportunities for studying intestinal diseases, nutritional health, and diabetes. It also brings researchers one step closer to growing patient-specific human intestines for transplant.

Medicine

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Proton Beam Therapy, Radiation Therapy, Cancer, Tumor, cyclotron radiation

UAB to Bring Proton Therapy for Advanced Cancer Treatment to Birmingham

UAB will partner with Proton International to bring proton therapy, one of the most technically advanced forms of cancer-killing radiation, to Alabama. Proton therapy delivers a more precise dose of radiation to a tumor and can avoid damage to healthy surrounding tissue better than conventional X-ray radiation.

Medicine

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PARP, Enzyme, DNA, Ut Southwestern

New Studies Unravel Mysteries of How PARP Enzymes Work

A component of an enzyme family linked to DNA repair, stress responses, and cancer also plays a role in enhancing or inhibiting major cellular activities under physiological conditions, new research shows.

Science

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Cell Biology, fish, Zebrafish, Development, Immune System, Macrophage, Cell Migration, tissue development, cell communication

Immune Cell Serves as an Essential Communications Link for Migrating Cells

Scientists at the University of Washington have discovered that macrophages, a common type of cell in the vertebrate immune system, can transmit messages between non-immune cells. Their paper, published online Feb. 16 in the journal Science, is the first reported instance of macrophages relaying messages over a long distance between non-immune cells.

Science

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Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Zoology

Biochemical Tricks of the Hibernating Bear

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Winter is in full swing, and many of us have fantasized about curling up in a warm cave and slumbering until the warmth of spring arrives, just like a bear. Bears have the ability to sleep away the harsh winter months when food is scarce. They can spend five to seven months in hibernation. During this time, bears do not eat, drink, excrete or exercise. Despite the length of inactivity, bears do not experience bone loss, muscle loss, heart complications or blood clots like humans do during extended bouts of inactivity.

Medicine

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Ulcer, stomach bug, Helicobacter Pylori, Pathogen, Pathogen Evolution

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Feb-2017 2:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Intestinal Microbes, Immune System, gut microbes, Microbes and Immune System, Microbial, Microbial influence, Gut Bacteria, Gut Bacteria and Health, Gut Interactions, Bacteria, Intestines, GUT, Immune Cells

Scientists Monitor Crosstalk Between Intestinal Microbes and Immune System

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Harvard Medical School researchers have successfully “listened in” on the crosstalk between gut microbes and the immune system.

Medicine

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Stem Cell, Leukemia, MDs, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, CRISPR, Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists Create Novel Model That Shows Progression From Normal Blood Cells to Leukemia

Mount Sinai researchers have created a novel model that shows the step-by-step progression from normal blood cells to leukemia and its precursor diseases, creating replicas of the stages of the disease to test the efficacy of therapeutic interventions at each stage, according to a study to be published in Cell Stem Cell. This research marked the first time scientists have been able to transplant leukemia from humans to a test tube and then into mice for study, a landmark feat that will allow for valuable research to help find therapies for blood cancer patients in the future.

Medicine

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hemagtology, JCI Insight, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Histiocytosis, Langerhans, HLH, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, press release, news, Research

Doctors Treat Deadly Cancerous Disorders with Gene-Guided, Targeted Therapy

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Genomic testing of biopsies from patients with deadly, treatment-resistant cancerous blood syndromes called histiocytoses allowed doctors to identify genes fueling the ailments and use targeted molecular drugs to successfully treat them. Researchers report their data in Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight (JCI Insight). They recommend the regular use of comprehensive genomic profiling at diagnosis to positively impact clinical care,

Medicine

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Retina, GARP1, GARP2, Rod cells, retinal degeneration, optical coherence tomography, Retinitis Pigmentosa

GARP2 Accelerates Retinal Degeneration in a Mouse Model

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Researchers show that GARP2 accelerates retinal degeneration in mice, and they have also made an important step toward creating a standardized OTC nomenclature between mice and humans for a measurement of retinal degeneration.

Science

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Climate Change Impacting Wildlife, Feeding Wild Dolphins, Conserving Blakiston's Fish Owl, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Medicine

Science

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Schizophrenia, Autism, neurologic disorder

Kennesaw State University Scientists Conducting Cutting-Edge Research

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Two Kennesaw State University scientists have received a total of $737,364 in National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health grants for developmental biology research into autism and birth defects.

Medicine

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Study: Hormone Therapy May Not Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

The latest study on hormone therapy and Alzheimer’s disease shows no relationship between taking the drugs and whether you may develop the disease years later. Some previous studies have shown that hormone therapy may increase the risk of the disease, while others have shown that it may reduce the risk. The new study was published in the February 15, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, 21 gene assay, 21-gene expression, early-stage breast cancer, MD Anderson Cancer Center

More Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer May Be Able to Avoid Chemotherapy in the Future

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Women with early-stage breast cancer who had an intermediate risk recurrence score (RS) from a 21-gene expression assay had similar outcomes, regardless of whether they received chemotherapy, a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer finds.







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