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Environment, Climate Change

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Mar-2017 3:00 PM EDT

Life

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Bullying, bullying solutions, workplace bullying, organizational communication, work culture, Harrassment

Does Advice for Managing Workplace Bullying Really Work?

In a new study featured in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research, authors Stacy Tye-Williams and Kathleen J. Krone identify and re-imagine the paradox of workplace bullying advice. They interviewed 48 individuals from a variety of occupations and found that targets of workplace bullying frequently offered advice they had received to other targets, despite believing that the advice either made no difference or had made their own situations worse.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Mar-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Seth Margolis, Alzheimer’s, ephexin5 , Brain, Amyloid

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Mar-2017 4:00 PM EDT

Science

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Seal Beach, California, Wetlands, Earthquakes, paleoseismology, U.S. Geological Survey

Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands Tied to Ancient Quakes

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When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.

Medicine

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Infectious Diseases, zika virus, Pregnancy, Obstetrics, Autism, Neurology, Virology

How Prenatal Maternal Infections May Affect Genetic Factors in Autism Spectrum Disorder

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In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, University of Cyprus and Stanford University map the complex biological cascade caused by MIA: the expression of multiple genes involved in autism are turned up or down by MIA, affecting key aspects of prenatal brain development that may increase risk for atypical development later in life.

Medicine

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Genetics, Psychiatry, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Depression, Mental Health, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Neuroscience

Mouse Study Identifies New Method for Treating Depression

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Standard antidepressant medications don’t work for everyone, and even when they do they are slow to kick in. In an effort to find better depression treatments, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) relieves signs of depression in mice. Moreover, inhibiting GLO1 worked much faster than the conventional antidepressant Prozac.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Pedestrians, pedestrian safety , pedestrian fatalities, Pedestrian Accidents, Pedestrian, Traffic Safety, Road Safety, African Americans, bias, Bias Perception

Study Confirms Motorists Less Likely to Stop for Black Pedestrians

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The research may help explain why people of color are disproportionately affected by fatal pedestrian crashes.

Science

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mammalian dwarfism, Mammalian, Dwarfism, Climate Change, Global Warming, Global Warming And The Environment, Global Warming Research, Evolution Biology, Palentology, animal shrinkage

UNH Research Finds Pattern of Mammal Dwarfing During Global Warming

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More than 50 million years ago, when the Earth experienced a series of extreme global warming events, early mammals responded by shrinking in size. While this mammalian dwarfism has previously been linked to the largest of these events, research led by the University of New Hampshire has found that this evolutionary process can happen in smaller, so-called hyperthermals, indicating an important pattern that could help shape an understanding of underlying effects of current human-caused climate change.

Medicine

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Lauren Osborne, Postpartum, Depression, Allopregnanolone, Pregnancy, Mood Disorder, Johns Hopkins

Low Levels of ‘Anti-Anxiety’ Hormone Linked to Postpartum Depression

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In a small-scale study of women with previously diagnosed mood disorders, Johns Hopkins researchers report that lower levels of the hormone allopregnanolone in the second trimester of pregnancy were associated with an increased chance of developing postpartum depression in women already known to be at risk for the disorder.







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