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Can Coffee Reduce Your Risk of MS?

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Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015.

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Milk Proteins Show Promise in Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

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In a review of the existing research, a team of Australian researchers found that milk proteins, consisting of short sequences called peptides, are potential candidates for the development of anticancer agents and can be generated by enzymatic action, such as those experienced during digestion or food processing, including fermentation. Their findings are in the recent issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

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What's Next in Diets: Chili Peppers?

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A large percentage of the world's population -- fully one third, by the World Health Organization's estimates -- is currently overweight or obese. This staggering statistics has made finding ways to address obesity a top priority for many scientists around the globe, and now a group of researchers at the University of Wyoming has found promise in the potential of capsaicin -- the chief ingredient in chili peppers -- as a diet-based supplement.

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Compound Found In Grapes, Red Wine May Help Prevent Memory Loss

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A compound found in common foods such as red grapes and peanuts may help prevent age-related decline in memory, according to new research published by a faculty member in the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine.

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Gluten-Free Diet Is Treatment, Not Trend, for Those with Celiac Disease

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For people who have celiac disease, going gluten-free isn't a lifestyle choice, it's a necessity. For everyone else, steering clear of gluten isn't necessarily a good idea.

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Social Media Can Provide the Support Needed to Maintain Weight Loss

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According to recent research from the Arnold School of Health at the University of South Carolina, use of social media sites like Facebook can be associated with a significant drop in pounds, especially during the critical maintenance period of a weight loss journey.

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Blueberries: Small Fruit Delivers Big Reward

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Just one cup of blueberries per day could be the key to reducing blood pressure and arterial stiffness, both of which are associated with cardiovascular disease.

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Men’s Diets Are Related to Local Offerings, Unlike Women’s

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Men’s eating habits are associated with the availability of healthy food sources in their residential neighbourhood but women’s are not, according to researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHUM hospital.

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Scripps Research Institute Scientists Uncover New, Fundamental Mechanism for How Resveratrol Provides Health Benefits

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that resveratrol, the red-wine ingredient once touted as an elixir of youth, powerfully activates an evolutionarily ancient stress response in human cells. The finding should dispel much of and controversy about how resveratrol really works.

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‘Tis the Season to Indulge in Walnuts

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Researchers at UC Davis and other institutions have found that diets rich in whole walnuts or walnut oil slowed prostate cancer growth in mice. In addition, both walnuts and walnut oil reduced cholesterol and increased insulin sensitivity. The walnut diet also reduced levels of the hormone IGF-1, which had been previously implicated in both prostate and breast cancer. The study was published online in the Journal of Medicinal Food.