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Science

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Life Science, Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, biomedical workforce, Education, Training, Science Education, Graduate Education

Coalition Seeks to Increase Transparency on Life Science Career Prospects

Nine U.S. research universities and a major cancer institute are announcing plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.

Medicine

Science

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Stress-induced sleep

Stressed-Out Worms Hit the Snooze Button

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When you catch a nasty cold, curling up in bed to sleep may be the only activity you can manage. Sleeping in response to stress isn’t a uniquely human behavior: many other animals have the same reaction, and it’s not clear why. While the circadian sleep that follows the pattern of the clock has been studied extensively, sleep that’s triggered by stress is far less understood.

Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

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Net Neutrality, Business, Information Systems, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

@JHUCarey Professor Ravi Aron Available for Comment on Net Neutrality.

Medicine

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Brain, Glutamate, Receptor, Albert Lau, Neurotransmitter

Johns Hopkins Scientists Chart How Brain Signals Connect to Neurons

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical’s pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

Medicine

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Physiology, Paralysis, Spinal Cord Injury, Bone Loss, Osteopenia, Muscle Weakness, Inflammation, Bone Marrow, Botulinum Toxin A

Muscle Paralysis May Increase Bone Loss

Muscle paralysis rapidly causes inflammation in nearby bone marrow, which may promote the formation of large cells that break down bone, a new study finds.

Medicine

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Prostate Cancer, liquid biopsy

Liquid Biopsy Results Differed Substantially Between Two Providers

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Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers. Liquid biopsy is a new and noninvasive alternative to tumor tissue sequencing, and it is intended to specifically detect and sequence tumor DNA circulating in patients’ blood. The results are used to help guide doctors to tailor the best treatment for patients at each point of their disease.

Medicine

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Obesity, sugary drinks, Sugary Beverages, Warning Labels

Warning Labels Can Help Reduce Soda Consumption and Obesity, New Study Suggests

Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Life

Education

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Stem Education

St. Mary’s College of Maryland a Top 25 Hidden Gem for Women in STEM by CollegeRaptor.com

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St. Mary’s College of Maryland has been listed among the Top 25 Hidden Gems for Women in STEM by CollegeRaptor.com, a higher education planning tool that offers side-by-side comparisons of colleges.

Science

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Polarize, light filtering, vector polarizer, light waves, Optics, optical systems, Gui-Geng Liu, Yun-Han Lee, Yuge Huang, Zheyuan Zhu, Guanjun Tan, Meng-Qiang Cai, Ping-Ping Li, Dan Wang, Yongnan Li, Shuo Pang, Chenghou Tu, Shin-Tson Wu, Hui-Tian Wang, Nankai University, University of Central Florida, Nanjing University, APL Photonics

Advance in Light Filtering Technology Has Implications for LCD Screens, Lasers and Beyond

Vector polarizers are a light filtering technology hidden behind the operation of many optical systems. They can be found, for instance, in sunglasses, LCD screens, microscopes, microprocessors, laser machining and more. Optical physicists published details of their new vector polarizer design this week in APL Photonics. The newly proposed design is a major advance in polarization technology because it enables flexible filtering of a wide range of light sources and generation of new light states.

Medicine

Science

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ultra-thin diamond, Radiology, Radiation, Dosage, radiation biology, Diamond, diamond membrane, Philippe Barberet, Michal Pomorski, Giovanna Muggiolu, Eva Torfeh, Gérard Claverie, Cédric Huss, Samuel Saada, Guillaume Devès, Marina Simon, Hervé Seznec, Université de Bordeaux, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CEA‐LIST, Applied Physics Letters

New Ultra-Thin Diamond Membrane Is a Radiobiologist’s Best Friend

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Measuring dosage of radiation can be challenging, especially when working with low-energy protons, but researchers have now developed an ultra-thin diamond membrane that can measure the number of protons in a dose of radiation with almost perfect accuracy. The detector attaches to a charged-particle microbeam and enables the delivery of radiation to an area less than 2 micrometers wide. The study, published this week in Applied Physics Letters, represents a valuable technological advance for radiation biology.







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