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For Type V AC Joint Injuries, Early Surgery May Not Be the Best Approach

Early surgery may not be the best treatment option for patients with Type V AC joint injuries, according to new research from Tripler Army Medical Center. The study, presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day, showed military personnel returned to duty faster when surgery was not performed.

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No Need to Delay Rotator Cuff Surgery, Study Shows

Delaying rotator cuff surgery on patients with shoulder stiffness may not be necessary, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Pain Injections for Hip Arthroscopy Patients May Not Predict Surgical Outcomes

How best to treat and recover from complicated hip injuries is a growing field in orthopaedic medicine. While diagnostic hip injections are commonly performed for patients with labral tear to confirm the pain etiology, research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day suggests that pain relief from this diagnostic injection may not predict better outcomes following arthroscopic hip surgery.

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New Way to Evaluate Meniscus Tear Outcomes

An individual’s meniscus (cushion in the knee) is one of the most important ligaments in the leg providing stability, load bearing and preservation of the knee joint. It is also one of the most easily injured areas and difficult to fully heal. Researchers presenting their study at today’s Specialty Day meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) utilized MRI data to determine the potential for biologic healing following a meniscus tear.

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Young Athletes at Greater Risk for Re-Injury after ACL Surgery

One in three young athletes who undergo ACL surgery experiences re-injury, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day. The study examined the long term success of surgery for patients aged 18 years and younger.

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Researchers Highlight Shoulder and Elbow Injury Possibility in Youth Players

Pitching speed, player’s height, and pitching for multiple teams may correlate with a history of shoulder and elbow injuries, according to new research released today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day.

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Most NFL Players with Injuries to the Midfoot Return to Game Action

- Nearly 93 percent of National Football League (NFL) athletes who sustained traumatic injuries to the midfoot returned to competition less than 15 months after injury and with no statistically significant decrease in performance, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Mar-2015 12:45 PM EDT

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Penn Medicine Experts Unveil Two New Ways to Identify Joint Replacement Patients at Risk for Post-Operative Complications

Orthopedic surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed two new prediction tools aimed at identifying total hip and knee replacement patients who are at-risk of developing serious complications after surgery. The investigators unveiled the new models, and study findings on which they are based, on Thursday, March 26, 2015, at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting in Las Vegas.

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2nd Tommy John Surgery Linked to Performance Decline, Shortened Career

Major League Baseball pitchers who underwent a second Tommy John surgery saw their performance decline and their career shortened, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital.