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Sports Injuries, Excercise, Sprains, Strains, Tendon Injury, Ligament Tear

The Differences Between a Sprain, Strain and Tear

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For many, the start of a new year means the start of a new workout regimen. It is difficult enough to make the time commitment, but nothing throws off a resolution like an injury.

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Repetitive Head Injuries May Not Cause Movement Problems for Former NFL Players

Former NFL players who had repeated head injuries may not have significant problems with motor functions later in life, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Feb-2017 4:00 PM EST

Science

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Orthopaedic, Research, Sports Ingury, Concussion, concussion in sport, Youth Sports, youth football, Sports Medicine

Expert Available to Discuss Higher Risk of Injury in Youth Flag Football Compared to Youth Tackle Football

Medicine

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Dr. Cornelius Thiels, ice fishing, Medical Research, Minnesota News Releases, Multidisciplinary Simulation Center, news releases, trauma surgery

Ice Fishing as Extreme Sport: Burns, Broken Bones, Concussions Among Injuries Chronicled

Ice fishing might seem like a benign sport – for everyone except the fish. Sitting in a cozy shanty waiting for a bite, what could go wrong? A lot, Mayo Clinic surgeons have found. The ice fishing injuries they have chronicled seem more like a casualty list from an extreme sport: burns, broken bones, concussions and more. The findings are published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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ACSM, American College of Sports Medicine, Research, Tour De France, elite athletes

Unwrapping the Physiology of a Tour de France Champion

Latest Research Highlights from ACSM

Medicine

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ACSM, Research, Concussion, Injury, Sports Medicine

Concussion Alters Neuromuscular Function in Collegiate Athletes

Latest Research Highlights from ACSM

Medicine

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ACSM, American College of Sports Medicine, Low Birth Weight, Health, Fitness, Obesity

Are Low Birth-Weight Babies Prone to Lead Physically Inactive Lives?

Latest Research Highlights from ACSM

Medicine

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Physiology, Concussion, sports-related concussion, Sports-Related Head Injury, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, Cardiovascular System, Autonomic Nervous System, Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

Sports-Related Concussion Negatively Affects Heart Rate, Blood Pressure

A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury.

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Sports Medicine, Orthopedics, Primary Care, Health care provider, official health care provider, San Diego Padres

UC San Diego Health Named Official Health Care Provider of the San Diego Padres

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UC San Diego Health and the San Diego Padres reached an agreement on a multi-year partnership to become the Major League Baseball team’s Official Health Care Provider.

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Science

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Concussion, Driving, Sports Concussion, sports medicince, concussion care

A Concussion May Affect Your Driving Even After Symptoms Disappear, Says Study

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The effects a concussion has on driving a vehicle may continue to linger even after the symptoms disappear, according to a new study by University of Georgia researchers.

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Physiatry, Physiatrist, AAP, Association of Academic Physiatrists, Medicine, Research, Running, Doctor, Physician, Health, Medical, Runners

Do Foot and Tibia Angles Affect Loading Impact Rates in Runners?

Running is one of the most popular forms of fitness. Despite numerous health advantages, running injuries are common with incidence rates ranging from 19.4 to 79.3 percent. Foot strike patterns have been a topic of debate with regards to injury risk in runners. Foot strike patterns are typically separated into three categories: rearfoot strike, where the runner’s heel hits the ground first; midfoot strike, where the runner’s foot lands flat; and forefoot strike, where the runner’s ball of the foot lands on the ground first.

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Asim Shuja M.D., UF Health Jacksonville, Overeat, food impaction

Research Connects Overeating During National Events to Medical Problems

People who overeat during national holidays and national sporting events – like this weekend’s Super Bowl – are 10 times more likely to need emergency medical attention for food obstruction than any at other time of the year, according to a new study led by a University of Florida researcher.

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NFL, Concussion, Football, football concussions, Football Head Injury, Football Injuries

Who Is Responsible for the Health of NFL Players, Why, and What Can Be Done to Promote Player Health?

A groundbreaking report out of Harvard University explores who is responsible for the health of NFL players, why, and what ca be done to promote player health. The authors of the report are available for interviews.

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Professor's Football Research Emphasizes Lower Extremity Loading Patterns, Torque Production and Velocity-Based Resistance Training

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Sports Performance, Super Bowl, David Keeley, New Mexico State University, Mental Imagery

Professor's Research Demonstrates How Imagery Works to Improve Sport Performance

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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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sport psychology, Super Bowl

Super Bowl Equals Super Stress for Some Players

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The Super Bowl is one of the most watched events on the planet. When the New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons face off in Super Bowl LI on Sunday, Feb. 5, in Houston, Texas, millions will be watching and rooting for their favorite teams or players. For fans, their pregame ritual may center around Super Bowl commercials, nacho recipes and who will sing the National Anthem, but what’s going on in these elite athletes’ heads before the big game? Florida State University professors Graig Chow and Gershon Tenenbaum are experts on sport psychology and how professionals can help players prepare to compete in the biggest game of their careers.

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Soccer Players with More Headers More Likely to Have Concussion Symptoms

Soccer players who head the ball a lot are three times more likely to have concussion symptoms than players who don’t head the ball often, according to a new study published in the February 1, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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concussion and soccer ball heading, concussion and heading, concussion and soccer, Concussion, head impacts and soccer ball heading, Traumatic Head Injury

Soccer Ball Heading May Commonly Cause Concussion Symptoms

Frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under recognized cause of concussion symptoms, according to a study of amateur players led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers. The findings run counter to earlier soccer studies suggesting concussion injuries mainly result from inadvertent head impacts, such as collisions with other players or a goalpost. The study was published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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Super Bowl, Sports Performance, return to sport, Chicago Bulls, Chicago White Sox, Dr. Brian Cole

Dr. Brian Cole Treats the Pros and Can Offer Medical Insights Into Super Bowl Injuries and Post-Injury Performance

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