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Medicine

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Mechanism for Resistance to Immunotherapy Treatment Discovered

Two research groups from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have independently discovered a genetic mechanism in cancer cells that influences whether they resist or respond to immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors. The scientists say the findings reveal potential new drug targets and might aid efforts to extend the benefits of immunotherapy treatment to more patients and additional types of cancer.

Medicine

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Cancer, Immunotherapy, anti-PD-1, microbiome and cancer treatment, bifidobacterium, Responders

Specific Microbes in Digestive Tract Can Boost Success for Cancer Immunotherapy

Specific strains of intestinal bacteria can improve the response rate to immunotherapy for patients being treated for advanced melanoma. Patients with a higher ratio of “beneficial” bacteria to “non-beneficial” bacteria all showed a clinical response: a reduction in tumor size.

Science

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Danforth Center, Andrea Eveland, Plant Science, The Plant Cell

Danforth Center Scientists Uncover a Genetic Mechanism that Could Enhance Yield Potential in Cereal Crops

The Eveland laboratory’s research findings, “Brassinosteroids modulate meristem fate and differentiation of unique inflorescence morphology in Setaria viridis”, were recently published in the journal The Plant Cell.

Medicine

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MD Anderson Cancer Center, Breast Cancer, Dcis

New Cancer Model Shows Genomic Link Between Early-Stage and Invasive Breast Cancer Types

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A new genetic-based model may explain how a common form of early-stage breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progresses to a more invasive form of cancer say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Science

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Opioids, Opioid Epidemic, kappa opioid receptors, Pain Medication

Scientists Take a Big Step Toward Building a Better Opioid

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For the first time, UNC School of Medicine scientists and collaborators solved the crystal structure of the activated kappa opioid receptor bound to a morphine derivative. They then created a new drug-like compound that activates only that receptor, a key step in the development of new pain meds.

Medicine

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MD Anderson Cancer Center, Small Cell Lung Cancer, small cell, Medicare, Medicaid, treatment barriers

Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Face Barriers to Receiving Standard-of-Care Treatment

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Despite decades of clinical research establishing chemotherapy with thoracic radiation as the standard-of-care for the initial management of non-metastatic small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), a large percentage of U.S. patients do not receive these treatments and in turn have lower overall survival, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Medicine

Science

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Liangfang Zhang, Nanosponge, sepsis treatment, Endotoxin, proinflammatory cytokines, Macrophage

Macrophage Nanosponges Could Keep Sepsis in Check

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed macrophage "nanosponges"—nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages—that can safely remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. In lab tests, these macrophage nanosponges improved survival rates in mice with sepsis.

Science

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Carnivores, conservation efforts

Survey Shows Conservationists Conflicted on How to Best Coexist with Large Carnivores

A new article co-authored by Boise State Assistant Professor Neil Carter found that conservationists have wide-ranging viewpoints on how to best preserve and coexist with large carnivores, such as brown bears, gray wolves and tigers. These animals are considered to be at the top of their food chain in their native habitats.

Medicine

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Hematapoietic, Stem Cell, Transplant, Gene Therapy, New England Journal Of Medicine, Uc Davis

UC Davis Researcher Urges Caution on Engineered Stem Cells

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In a commentary published in the Jan. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, UC Davis researcher William Murphy expressed cautious optimism about efforts to genetically engineer hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to temporarily resist cell death during transplantation. While these gene therapy approaches could dramatically improve patient outcomes, Murphy argues that their risks must be carefully studied in diverse models.

Science

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Kinesin, Microtubule, Cancer Treatment, anti-cancer

New Research Sheds Light on Kinesin Motility

Similar to roadways across the country, every cell in our body has a network of paths, and a professor at Texas A&M University has zoomed in to the molecular level to research the proteins that travel along this transportation system.







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