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Pediatric Neuropsychology Program at NYU Lutheran Helps Children Develop Into Healthy Adults

The pediatric neuropsychology program at NYU Lutheran, led by Gianna Locascio, PsyD, brings a new level of care to Brooklyn families.

Medicine

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Blue Ridge, Rankings, Ophthalmology, Preventive Medicine, Otolarygology, Microbiology, Neurology, Urology, Physiology, NIH Award, Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research, medical school rankings, Nih Grants, Nih Funding

Keck School of Medicine of USC Receives its Highest National Institutes of Health Funding Ranking to Date

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) recently received the school’s highest ranking in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding since the Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research began its annual ranking of medical schools in 2006. The rankings represent total NIH funding granted from October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016. The USC Department of Ophthalmology and Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC both ranked No. 2 nationally among the nation’s ophthalmology and preventive medicine departments receiving NIH funds. The Keck School of Medicine of USC also ranked No. 1 in NIH funds received per principal investigator.

Science

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Jordan Green, Ultrasound, Brain, Nanoparticles, perfluoropentane

Noninvasive Ultrasound Pulses Used to Precisely Tweak Rat Brain Activity

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Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound.

Medicine

Science

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Autism, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Microbiome, Center For Disease Control, Center for Disease Control and Prevention

NAU Researcher Discovers Key to Fighting Autism May Lie Not in the Mind, but in the Gut

Greg Caporaso showed promising research that could lead to a new treatment option for autism spectrum disorder.

Medicine

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Stem Cells, Immunotherapy, Cancer, zika virus, Infectious Diseases, Pregnancy, Public Health, Pediatrics, Neurology, Natural Killer Cells

CIRM Approves New Funding to UC San Diego Researchers Fighting Zika Virus and Cancer

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The Independent Citizens Oversight Committee of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved a pair of $2 million awards to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers to advance studies of new treatments for Zika virus infections and the use of stem cell-derived natural killer (NK) cells to target ovarian cancer and other malignancies.

Medicine

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Sleep, Neurology, New Year's Resolutions, Weight, Smoking, Exercise

Want to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions? Get More Sleep

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Making New Year’s resolutions is easy. Keeping them — beyond a couple of weeks, at least — is tough. One big factor that affects whether the commitment sticks: sleep. A sleep expert and neurologist explains how better sleep can help you keep those resolutions, including eating healthier, exercising more and getting a promotion.

Medicine

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medical advancement, neurologic examination, Brain Surgery

New ‘Smart Needle’ to Make Brain Surgery Safer

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A new high-tech medical device to make brain surgery safer has been developed by researchers at the University of Adelaide.

Medicine

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Cognitive Decline, SWAN, Women's Health, Menopause

Women’s Cognitive Decline Begins Earlier Than Previously Believed

Mental sharpness in women begins to decline as early as their 50s. Cognitive processing speed, which includes speed of perception and reaction, showed an average decline of around 1 percent every two years and verbal memory declined on average around 1 percent every five years.

Medicine

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Northwestern University, Northwestern Medicine, Brain

Brain Stimulation Used Like a Scalpel to Improve Memory

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Northwestern Medicine scientists showed for the first time that non-invasive brain stimulation can be used like a scalpel, rather than like a hammer, to cause a specific improvement in precise memory.Precise memory, rather than general memory, is critical for knowing details such as the specific color, shape and location of a building you are looking for, rather than simply knowing the part of town it’s in.

Medicine

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Physical Therapy, Rehabiliation, Brain Tumor, Meningioma, Seizure, CARF Accreditation

Brain Tumor Survivor Moves Into Next Phase of Life Thanks to Rehab Experts

Physical therapist Jorge Neira is helping Ruben Arellano regain use of his arms and the ability to walk. Arellano had a baseball-sized tumor removed from his head. The two share successes and setbacks on the arduous road to recovery at Harris Health System's CARF-accredited hospital.

Medicine

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In Alzheimer’s, Excess Tau Protein Damages Brain’s GPS

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Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.

Medicine

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Hypertension, masked hypertension, Blood Pressure, High Blood Pressure

Study Shows 1 in 8 Americans – 17 Million – Have “Masked” Hypertension

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology reveals that the U.S. prevalence of masked hypertension is 12.3 percent. Based on the U.S. population, this translates to approximately 17.1 million people, or 1 in 8 adults

Medicine

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Sports, Neurology, Soccer, Concussion, concussion awareness, concussion in sport, soccer heading

UC Researchers Hypothesize: Could Better Eye Training Help Reduce Concussion in Women’s Soccer?

In a photo analysis study of soccer headers, University of Cincinnati researchers noticed female soccer players had their eyes closed 90 percent of the time. As a first step toward determining if less visual awareness might expose players to a higher risk of injury, the study wanted to quantify whether female athletes closed their eyes more frequently than male counterparts.

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Mapping Brain in Preemies May Predict Later Disability

Scanning a premature infant’s brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain’s white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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Neurosurgery, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Cerebrovascular Neurosurgery, Brain Surgery

Multidisciplinary Neurosurgical Approach to Treating Cerebrovascular Disorders

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Science

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The Tasmanian Tiger Had a Brain Structure Suited to a Predatory Life Style

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Brain scans suggest the action-planning part of the cortex was large in these extinct predators.

Science

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Biology, Brain, Hippocampus, Neuron, Dendrite, Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders

Study Identifies Molecular Signal for Maintaining Adult Neuron

Research in mice points to better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

Medicine

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Delirium Could Accelerate Dementia-Related Mental Decline

When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and the University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.

Medicine

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Cardiovascular disease, , Heart Attack, stroke, , Statins, Diabetes, Physicians, American Heart Association, , Prevention, Primary Care, Primary prevention

Experts Urge for Wider Prescription of Statins in Treatment and Prevention

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Researchers from Florida Atlantic University and Harvard Medical School address the possible but unproven link between statins and diabetes, as well as the implications of prescription of statins for clinicians and their patients. They emphasize that the risk of diabetes, even if real, pales in comparison to the benefits of statins in both the treatment and primary prevention of heart attacks and strokes. The editor-in-chief published the commentary and his editorial online ahead of print.

Medicine

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Neuropathy, Pathology, pain, Drug Development, Peripheral Nerve Disorders, Cell Biology, Neuroscience

Blocking Neuron Signaling Pathway Could Lead to New Treatments for Peripheral Neuropathy

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV.







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