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Article ID: 688873

Uncovering the Long-Term Health Impact of Playing in the NFL

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In 1987, National Football League players went on strike. As a response, NFL teams scrambled to fill their rosters with “replacement players,” individuals who had some experience with college or professional football, but who weren’t part of NFL rosters that year. The replacement players themselves became a footnote in sports history. It turns out these players may actually play a critical role in football today - by helping us understand how playing in the NFL affects long-term health. In our recent study, published in JAMA, we compared the life expectancies of professional NFL players who debuted between 1982 and 1992 to the life expectancies of replacement players from the 1987 strike.

Released:
2-Feb-2018 9:10 AM EST
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Article ID: 688829

Culturally-Adapted Intervention May Help Hispanics with Serious Mental Illness

Washington University in St. Louis

The first study to examine the initial impact of a culturally-adapted health care manager intervention aimed at helping Hispanics with serious mental illness finds the intervention shows potential for improving their health outcomes.“ ‘Bridges to Better Health and Wellness’ is a promising intervention that can help to address some of the health care disparities faced by Hispanics with serious mental illness (SMI), a population that is often overlooked in the literature and in the system of care,” said lead author Leopoldo Cabassa, associate professor at the Brown School and an expert in racial and ethnic disparities in health and mental health care.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Healthcare, Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry

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Article ID: 688815

Neurons Get the Beat and Keep It Going in Drumrolls

Georgia Institute of Technology

Some of what researchers believed to be chaotic electrical potentials in neurons are turning out the be surprisingly orderly and rhythmic.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Neuro, Technology, Local - Atlanta Metro, Grant Funded News

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    1-Feb-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688702

Zeroing in on Dopamine

Harvard Medical School

Harvard Medical School scientists have identified the molecular machinery responsible for secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine, opening door for new strategies to precision target dopamine release.

Released:
30-Jan-2018 3:05 PM EST
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Behavioral Science, Cell Biology, Chemistry, Neuro, Local - Massachusetts, Local - Boston Metro

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Article ID: 688868

Research Uncovers Gene Network That Regulates Motor Neuron Formation During Embryonic Development

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have discovered the inner workings of a gene network that regulates the development of spinal motor neurons in the growing chicken and mouse embryo. The research also answers a long-standing question about why motor neurons, the nerve cells of the spinal cord that control muscle movement, form much faster than other types of neurons.

Released:
1-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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    1-Feb-2018 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 688575

White Adults With Mental Illness Far More Likely Than Other Ethnic Groups to Report Insufficient Money for Care and Delays in Care

Mount Sinai Health System

White adults with mental illness were significantly more likely than those of other ethnicities to report having insufficient money for mental health care or facing delays in care, a Mount Sinai study found. Whites were 50 percent more likely than blacks to experience delays in care, and 20 percent more likely than blacks to lack enough money for treatments such as doctor visits and prescription drugs, the researchers found.

Released:
29-Jan-2018 7:00 AM EST
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All Journal News, Healthcare, Mental Health, Neuro, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro

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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688525

In-Person License Renewal, not Physician Reporting, Associated with Fewer Crash Hospitalizations Among Drivers with Dementia

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Requiring physicians to report patients with dementia to state driver’s licensing authorities is not associated with fewer hospitalizations from motor vehicle crashes. However, in-person license renewal laws and vision testing dramatically cut crashes involving drivers with dementia.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 10:00 AM EST
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Alzheimer's and Dementia, Healthcare, Neuro, Neurology (journal), Local - Pennsylvania, All Journal News

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  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688553

Balance Exercises May Help People with Multiple Sclerosis

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A special program that involves balance and eye movement exercises may help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) with their balance problems and fatigue, according to a study published in the January 31, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
26-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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All Journal News, Exercise and Fitness, Mental Health, Neuro, Neurology (journal)

Article ID: 688760

Machine Learning Techniques Generate Clinical Labels of Medical Scans

Mount Sinai Health System

The study’s findings will help train artificial intelligence to diagnose diseases

Released:
31-Jan-2018 3:10 PM EST
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Neuro, Surgery, Technology, Healthcare, All Journal News, Local - New York, Local - New York Metro

  • Embargo expired:
    31-Jan-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 688605

Stroke Recovery Improved by Sensory Deprivation, Mouse Study Shows

Washington University in St. Louis

Mice that had experienced strokes were more likely to recover the ability to use a front paw if their whiskers were clipped following a stroke. Trimming the whiskers deprives an area of the mouse’s brain from receiving sensory signals from the animals’ whiskers. And it leaves that area of the brain more plastic – or receptive to rewiring to take on new tasks.

Released:
29-Jan-2018 12:05 PM EST
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