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Article ID: 695826

CDC Suicide Report: UCLA Expert Available

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Released:
8-Jun-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695825

After reports of Anthony Bourdain's suicide, Inger Burnett-Zeigler, PhD, psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital available to discuss suicide prevention.

Northwestern Medicine

Released:
8-Jun-2018 7:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695819

Is a stress shot on the horizon?

University of Colorado Boulder

Rats injected with beneficial bacteria weekly for three weeks showed lasting anti-inflammatory changes in the brain and more resilience when exposed to stress. The findings could lead to new microbiome-based immunizations for anxiety and PTSD and new treatments for depression.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695795

Former UVA Darden Professor’s Battle With Parkinson’s Leads to Inspirational Book

University of Virginia Darden School of Business

Highlights former Professor Robert Spekman’s book, My Journey with Parkinson’s Disease, which chronicles his fight with Parkinson’s disease

Released:
7-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jun-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695663

Active HIV in Large White Blood Cells May Drive Cognitive Impairment in Infected Mice

Mount Sinai Health System

An experimental model of HIV infection in mice, developed by Mount Sinai researchers, has shown that HIV causes learning and memory dysfunction, a cognitive disease that is now observed in about half of HIV infected people that worsens with age, and is currently incurable.

Released:
6-Jun-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695584

Waves Move Across the Human Brain to Support Memory

Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia Engineers have discovered a new fundamental feature of brain oscillations: they actually move rhythmically across the brain, reflecting patterns of neuronal activity that propagate across the cortex. The researchers also found that the traveling waves moved more reliably when subjects performed well while performing a working memory task, indicating traveling waves are important for memory and cognition: the waves play a significant role in supporting brain connectivity.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695769

In building the brain, cell pedigree matters

Harvard Medical School

Research in mice shows that a protein made by the stem cells that give rise to neurons, but not by neurons themselves, is key to brain cells’ ability to migrate during development and assume their proper positions. This primordial protein acts by clinging onto thousands of sites in the genome, affecting the activity of multiple genes that regulate brain development. The findings could yield valuable clues for a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 11:35 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695759

EU Criteria Fall Short of Protecting Public From Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society expressed continued concerns today that the European Union’s (EU’s) criteria for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in pesticides and biocides do not go far enough to protect public health.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695752

Understanding How Drug Reduces Confusion in Older Patients After Surgery May Lead to Better Care

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

A drug that reduces delirium in postoperative patients may work by preventing the overactivity of certain receptors in brain cells, according to a new study published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).

Released:
7-Jun-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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    6-Jun-2018 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 695466

Black, Hispanic People May Be More Likely to Have a Second Hemorrhagic Stroke than Whites

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Black and Hispanic people may be more likely to have another intracerebral hemorrhage, or a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain, than white people, according to a study published in the June 6, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
1-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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