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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Aug-2016 7:05 PM EDT

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavior, Demography, History, Political Science, Social And Behavioral Sciences

New UMN Study: America's Wars Take Uneven Toll

In today's wars, Americans who die or are wounded in battle are disproportionately coming from poorer parts of the country, according to a new study released this week.

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perception and awareness, personality attitude, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Fair or Unfair? Facial Cues Influence How Social Exclusion Is Judged

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People are often excluded from social groups. As researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, whether uninvolved observers find this acceptable or not may depend on the facial appearances of those excluded. The exclusion of cold and incompetent looking people is more likely to be accepted.

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Health Disparities, Native Americans and diabetes, Native Americans and obesity, South Dakota State University, Cheyenne River Indian Reservation , Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health, National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities , National Institutes Of Health (NIH), goal-setting, socioeconomic issues, Missouri Breaks Research Industries

New Approach May Improve Health of Native American Families

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Setting and achieving goals related to income and education may improve the overall health of Native Americans--that’s the premise behind a new research project, We RISE—raising income, supporting education—targeting young mothers on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in north central South Dakota. Health disparities research typically controls for socioeconomic status in analyses, but this study looks changing those socioeconomic variables.

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Ode to Recall: To Remember Events in Order, We Rely on the Brain’s “Symphony”

To remember events in the order they occur, the brain’s neurons function in a coordinated way that is akin to a symphony, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their findings offer new insights into how we recall information and point to factors that may disrupt certain types of memories.

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Presidential Candidates, Campaign Language, election 2016

Calm or Fiery? Study Says Candidate Language Should Match the Times

Potential voters who see the nation as being in dire economic straits view a presidential candidate as more “presidential” when he or she uses high-intensity, emotional language, a new study suggests.

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Italy earthquake

Experts Available to Discuss Italy Earthquake, Transportation Impact, Seismic Imaging

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Hurricane Katrina, Katrina Recovery, Pay inequality, Gender Disparities

Study: Women Are Healthier, but Losing Financial Ground in N.O. Post-Katrina Recovery

Tulane University’s Newcomb College Institute releases a comprehensive report on the status of women in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavior, Social And Behavioral Sciences

How Easy Is It to Spot a Lie?

"Who broke Grandma's favorite vase?" As you listen to a chorus of "I don't know" and "Not me," how will you determine the culprit? Conventional wisdom says, divide and conquer, but what does scientific research show us about questioning a group of people at one time? Unfortunately, very little.

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Milwaukee, Violence, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, UWM, UW-Milwaukee , Jenna Loyd, Public Health, Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, Zilber School of public health, urban violence, city, Cities, Segregation, Incarceration

Milwaukee Researcher Studies the Root Causes of Violence

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Colombia, Peace Agreement, Civil War, FARC, Latin American politics

#UCRiverside Latin America Scholar Optimistic About Historic Colombian Peace Deal

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Southern, Accent, southern accent, Linguistics, speech and language, Speech

What Makes Southerners Sound Southern?

Linguistic researchers will be isolating and identifying the specific variations in speech that make Southerners sound Southern.

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Drugs, Medicine & Health, pain, Social & Behavioral Sciences

THC Makes Rats Lazy, Less Willing to Try Cognitively Demanding Tasks

New research from the University of British Columbia suggests there may be some truth to the belief that marijuana use causes laziness-- at least in rats.

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Behavior, parenting child care, Social And Behavioral Sciences

Queen's Researchers Measure Emotional Flexibility in Mother-Daughter Dyads

Queen's University researchers Tom Hollenstein and Jessica Lougheed have published new research on the emotional bonds between mothers and adolescent daughters. The study examined how well mother-daughter pairs were able to manage rapid transitions between emotional states and the so-called "emotional rollercoaster" of adolescence.

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We Are All ‘Wired’ For Addiction, Says Texas A&M Researcher

Drug addicts and non-addicts may have more in common than ever thought, according to a researcher at Texas A&M University who found that to some degree, everyone’s brain is “wired” to become addicted.

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Religion, Children, Psychology, Research

Parents, Listen up: Children Keep Still During Prayer

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Preschool-aged children, and their parents, are more likely to view the physical actions of prayer (i.e., closing eyes, folding hands) to help with reflection and communicating with God. This is according to a new study by Rebekah Richert, a psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside. The paper, titled “Folding Your Hands Helps God Hear You: Prayer and Anthropomorphism in Parents and Children,” was published in Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion.

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Back To School, Brain Activity, Brain Development In Children, Learning and Development

"Warm Up" Your Child's Brain to Prepare for Back-to-School

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Americans Favor Gender Roles for Both Heterosexual and Same-Sex Couples

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A majority of Americans think the “more masculine” partner and the “more feminine” partner in a same-sex couple should generally be responsible for stereotypically male and female chores, according to new research.

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College Students, faculty-student interactions, Mentoring, Student Research

Interactions with Faculty Differ for Male and Female College Students

In a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Indiana University doctoral student Emma Cohen looks for answers to questions of how gender shapes college students’ day-to-day academic experiences.

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Demography, Climate Change, History, Social And Behavioral Sciences, Urbanization

The demise of the Maya civilization: Water shortage can destroy cultures

Something really drastic must have happened to the Ancient Maya at the end of the Classic Period in the 9th century. Within a short period of time, this advanced civilisation in Central America went from flourishing to collapsing -- the population dwindling rapidly and monumental stone structures, like the ones built at Yucatán, were no longer being constructed. The reason for this demise remains the subject of debate even today. Model calculations by TU Wien may have found the explanation: the irrigation technology that served the Mayans well during periods of drought may have actually made their society more vulnerable to major catastrophes.







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