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Embargo will expire:
26-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
22-Feb-2018 1:00 PM EST

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Feb-2018 9:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Economics, Psychology and Psychiatry, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

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Article ID: 689996

Age Matters Behind the Wheel – but Not How You Might Expect

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A UCLA study explored the relationship between new drivers' skills to age, gender and playing organized sports or video games. The results suggest all novice drivers should undergo mandatory training, not just teenagers. Age: Among males, the older the student, the worse his driving skills score.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Gaming, Sports, Travel and Transportation

Embargo will expire:
26-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
22-Feb-2018 12:05 PM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Nature (journal)

Article ID: 689979

Descriptive Phrases for How Often Food Should Be Eaten Helps Preschoolers Better Understand Healthy Eating

Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Approximately one in four preschoolers in the US are overweight or obese, and poor nutrition in early childhood has enduring consequences to children’s cognitive functioning. Preschool, therefore, is a critical period for children to begin to make their own dietary decisions to develop life-long healthy eating habits. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that preschoolers who learned how to classify food as healthy or unhealthy were more likely to say they would choose healthy food as a snack.

Released:
22-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavioral Science, Education, Food Science, Health Food, Nutrition, All Journal News

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Article ID: 689945

Violent Video Games May Serve as an Outlet for Aggression, Not a Precursor, Says Virginia Tech Expert

Virginia Tech

According to a recent study published in Violence and Gender video games decrease the likelihood of producing hate material online and researcher Jim Hawdon says “this finding suggests that violent video games may serve as an outlet for aggression, not a precursor.”

Released:
22-Feb-2018 1:40 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Gender Issues, Local - Virginia, All Journal News

Article ID: 689919

UCI Professor Finds New Digital Divide Threatening Well-Being of Low-Income Teens

University of California, Irvine

In one sense, the digital divide between teenagers from different socio-economic backgrounds is narrowing: All increasingly have access to technologies such as smartphones and computers. But a new digital divide appears to be emerging over the types of experiences these teens have online, according to a University of California, Irvine researcher.

Released:
21-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Children's Health, Economics, Psychology and Psychiatry, Technology, Nature (journal), Local - California

Article ID: 689916

Infant Skull Binding Shaped Identity, Inequality in Ancient Andes

Cornell University

The idea of binding and reshaping a baby’s head may make today’s parents cringe, but for families in the Andes between 1100-1450, cranial modification was all the rage.

Released:
21-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Local - New York

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Article ID: 689872

Psychopathic Employees Thrive Under Abusive Supervisors, Study Finds

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

A new study shows that individuals who possess high primary psychopathic characteristics appear to have distinct advantages over those who don’t, when working for an abusive supervisor.

Released:
21-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavioral Science, In the Workplace, Psychology and Psychiatry, Featured: BizWire, All Journal News, Staff Picks

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Article ID: 689800

Perceptions about God Make Democrats More Conservative and Republicans More Liberal — But in Different Ways

Baylor University

Republicans who believe that God is very involved with humanity are like Democrats — more liberal — when it comes to social and economic justice issues, according to a Baylor University study. Meanwhile, Democrats who see God as a strict father tend to agree about with "an eye-for-an-eye" policy when it comes to harsher criminal punishment and military solutions to foreign conflicts.

Released:
20-Feb-2018 11:50 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 689825

Gen Z Using Social Media to Start a Political Movement in Aftermath of School Shooting

West Virginia University

Released:
20-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavioral Science, Crime and Forensic Science, Government/Law, Guns and Violence, U.S. Politics


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