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Released: 16-Jul-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Breakthrough in studying ancient DNA from Doggerland that separates the UK from Europe
University of Warwick

Thousands of years ago the UK was physically joined to the rest of Europe through an area known as Doggerland. However, a marine inundation took place during the mid-holocene, separating the British landmass from the rest of Europe, which is now covered by the North Sea.

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Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tree rings show unprecedented rise in extreme weather in South America
Earth Institute at Columbia University

Scientists have filled a gaping hole in the world's climate records by reconstructing 600 years of soil-moisture swings across southern and central South America.

Newswise: Light a Critical Factor in Limiting Carbon Uptake, Especially in the North
6-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Light a Critical Factor in Limiting Carbon Uptake, Especially in the North
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A new Columbia Engineering study demonstrates that even when temperatures warm and cold stress is limited, light is still a major factor in limiting carbon uptake of northern high latitudes. The team analyzed satellite observations, field measurements, and model simulations and showed that there is a prevalent radiation limitation on carbon uptake in northern ecosystems, especially in autumn.

Newswise: Antarctic Sea-Ice Models Improve for the Next IPCC Report
Released: 10-Jun-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Antarctic Sea-Ice Models Improve for the Next IPCC Report
University of Washington

A study of 40 sea ice models finds they all project that the area of sea ice around Antarctica will decrease by 2100, but the amount of loss varies between the emissions scenarios.

Newswise: Long term data show hurricanes are getting stronger
14-May-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Long term data show hurricanes are getting stronger
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In almost every region of the world where hurricanes form, their maximum sustained winds are getting stronger. That is according to a new study by scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Center for Environmental Information and University of WisconsinMadison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, who analyzed nearly 40 years of hurricane satellite imagery.

Newswise: Atmospheric scientist says US carbon dioxide emissions have dropped to unprecedented levels during pandemic
Released: 28-Apr-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Atmospheric scientist says US carbon dioxide emissions have dropped to unprecedented levels during pandemic
Northern Arizona University

As the demand for transportation fuels has plummeted at an unprecedented rate in the last month due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a Northern Arizona University scientist says the dramatic decrease in local air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels above cities is significant, measurable and could be historic, depending on how long commuters and other drivers stay off the road.

Newswise: More Protections Needed to Safeguard Biodiversity in the Southern Ocean
21-Apr-2020 2:00 PM EDT
More Protections Needed to Safeguard Biodiversity in the Southern Ocean
University of Colorado Boulder

Current marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean need to be at least doubled to adequately safeguard the biodiversity of the Antarctic, according to a new CU Boulder study.

Newswise: Precipitation Will Be Essential for Plants to Counteract Global Warming
10-Apr-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Precipitation Will Be Essential for Plants to Counteract Global Warming
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A new Columbia Engineering study shows that increased water stress—higher frequency of drought due to higher temperatures, is going to constrain the phenological cycle: in effect, by shutting down photosynthesis, it will generate a lower carbon uptake at the end of the season, thus contributing to increased global warming.

Newswise: Indian Ocean phenomenon spells climate trouble for Australia
Released: 10-Mar-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Indian Ocean phenomenon spells climate trouble for Australia
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

New international research by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues has found a marked change in the Indian Ocean’s surface temperatures that puts southeast Australia on course for increasingly hot and dry conditions.

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Released: 28-Feb-2020 10:55 AM EST
Study shows rapid sea level rise along Atlantic coast of North America in 18th century
University of York

The study, led by the University of York, found evidence for a period of enhanced pre-industrial sea-level rise of about two to three millimetres per year in three locations: Nova Scotia, Maine and Connecticut.

Newswise: As Oceans Warm, Fish Flee
Released: 24-Feb-2020 11:45 AM EST
As Oceans Warm, Fish Flee
University of Delaware

New research shows that nations in the tropics are especially vulnerable to the loss of fish species due to climate change. But none of the 127 international fisheries agreements have language that prepares countries for the exits of stock, climate change or range shifts.

Newswise: Sugar Ants’ Preference for Pee May Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Released: 6-Feb-2020 8:55 AM EST
Sugar Ants’ Preference for Pee May Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions
University of South Australia

An unlikely penchant for pee is putting a common sugar ant on the map, as new research from the University of South Australia shows their taste for urine could play a role in reducing greenhouse gases.

Newswise: Scientists Find Far Higher than Expected Rate of Underwater Glacial Melting
Released: 29-Jan-2020 6:00 AM EST
Scientists Find Far Higher than Expected Rate of Underwater Glacial Melting
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Tidewater glaciers, the massive rivers of ice that end in the ocean, may be melting underwater much faster than previously thought, according to a Rutgers co-authored study that used robotic kayaks. The findings, which challenge current frameworks for analyzing ocean-glacier interactions, have implications for the rest of the world’s tidewater glaciers, whose rapid retreat is contributing to sea-level rise.

20-Jan-2020 7:30 PM EST
New Investments and Research Indicate Multi-Trillion Dollar Market for Climate Restoration Through Carbon-Capture
Thunderbird School of Global Management

Climate restoration is the global movement to remove the trillion tons of excess CO2 from the atmosphere to restore our air to preindustrial levels of carbon dioxide and to preserve the Arctic ice. Given the climate emergency, climate restoration is a critical third pillar of climate action, complementing ongoing mitigation and adaptation efforts. New technologies and natural solutions for reducing CO2 levels in the next 30 years already exist and the costs for global-scale implementation are projected to be less than 1-3% of the global annual GDP.

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Released: 27-Dec-2019 12:35 PM EST
Snowmageddon warnings in North America come from tropics more than Arctic stratosphere
University of Reading

Winter weather patterns in North America are dictated by changes to the polar vortex winds high in the atmosphere, but the most significant cold snaps are more likely influenced by the tropics, scientists have found.

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Released: 19-Dec-2019 12:05 PM EST
Greenland ice loss is at ‘worse-case scenario’ levels, study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Dec. 19, 2019 – Greenland is losing ice mass seven times faster than in the 1990s, a pace that matches the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s high-end warming scenario – in which 400 million people would be exposed to coastal flooding by 2100, 40 million more than in the mid-range prediction. The alarming update resulted from the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Intercomparison Exercise, a project involving nearly 100 polar scientists from 50 international institutions, among them two from the University of California, Irvine.

Newswise: Study: Favorable Environments for Large Hail Increasing Across U.S.
Released: 9-Dec-2019 11:30 AM EST
Study: Favorable Environments for Large Hail Increasing Across U.S.
University at Albany, State University of New York

A group of atmospheric scientists have uncovered an environmental footprint that could help explain why the cost of hailstorm damage is rapidly increasing in the United States.

Newswise: Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought
Released: 1-Dec-2019 7:05 PM EST
Antarctic ice sheets could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought
University of South Australia

Antarctica is the largest reservoir of ice on Earth – but new research by the University of South Australia suggests it could be at greater risk of melting than previously thought.

5-Nov-2019 6:05 AM EST
Plants and fungi together could slow climate change
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new global assessment shows that human impacts have greatly reduced plant-fungus symbioses, which play a key role in sequestering carbon in soils. Restoring these ecosystems could be one strategy to slow climate change.

4-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
Switching to solar and wind will reduce groundwater use
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Researchers explored optimal pathways for managing groundwater and hydropower trade-offs for different water availability conditions as solar and wind energy start to play a more prominent role in California.

Released: 29-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Improving governance is key for adaptive capacity
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability.

Newswise:Video Embedded reframing-antarctica-s-meltwater-pond-dangers-to-ice-shelves-and-sea-level
VIDEO
Released: 25-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Reframing Antarctica’s Meltwater Pond Dangers to Ice Shelves and Sea Level
Georgia Institute of Technology

Meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick ice shelf, which then shatters in just weeks, shocking scientists and speeding the flow of the glacier behind it into the ocean to drive up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and sea level into cool, mathematical perspective.

Newswise: Ancient Molecules from the Sea Burst Into the Air From Ocean Waves
Released: 23-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Ancient Molecules from the Sea Burst Into the Air From Ocean Waves
Stony Brook University

When waves crash in the ocean, they inject tiny particles into the air that carry organic molecules more than 5,000 years old. This discovery, published in Science Advances by a national team of scientists, helps to solve a long-standing mystery as to what happens to ancient marine molecules.

Newswise: Using 'green' approach to manage stormwater runoff
Released: 18-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Using 'green' approach to manage stormwater runoff
South Dakota State University

Soil and plants, strategically placed, can help reduce stormwater runoff—and, in the long run, help relieve pressure on the city drainage system. However, engaging city officials and community members is integral to implementing these techniques.

Released: 18-Oct-2019 3:50 AM EDT
Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study shows that afforestation and other forms of climate-friendly land use not only helps to remove CO2 from the atmosphere to reduce global warming, but they can also contribute to achieving the SDGs.

Newswise: Planting a Trillion Trees Will Not Halt Climate Change
Released: 17-Oct-2019 4:55 PM EDT
Planting a Trillion Trees Will Not Halt Climate Change
Texas A&M AgriLife

A group of 46 scientists from around the world, led by Joseph Veldman, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University, are urging caution regarding plans to address climate change through massive tree planting.

Newswise: Types of activities that can help stave off effects of aging on the brain
Released: 16-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Types of activities that can help stave off effects of aging on the brain
University of Georgia

Exercise plus some type of cognitive component can impact brain aging

Newswise:Video Embedded 3-d-printed-coral-could-help-endangered-reefs
VIDEO
Released: 16-Oct-2019 10:45 AM EDT
3-D Printed Coral Could Help Endangered Reefs
University of Delaware

Threats to coral reefs are everywhere—rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research from the University of Delaware shows that 3-D printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for reef organisms and can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral.

Newswise: Narcotics Traffic Devastating Central American Rainforests, Fueling Climate Change
Released: 9-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Narcotics Traffic Devastating Central American Rainforests, Fueling Climate Change
Texas State University

Drug trafficking and, paradoxically, efforts to slow it are rapidly driving the deforestation in Central America's most vulnerable tropical rainforests, new research conducted in part by Texas State University reveals.

10-Sep-2019 11:00 AM EDT
How Can We Feed the World Without Overwhelming the Planet?
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study published in nature Sustainability proposes alternative hunger eradication strategies that will not compromise environmental protection.

Newswise: WildFires Could Permanently Alter Alaska’s Forest Composition
23-Aug-2019 2:00 PM EDT
WildFires Could Permanently Alter Alaska’s Forest Composition
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A team of researchers led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory projected that the combination of climate change and increased wildfires will cause the iconic evergreen conifer trees of Alaska to get pushed out in favor of broadleaf deciduous trees, which shed their leaves seasonally.

Newswise: The Case for Retreat in the Battle Against Climate Change
21-Aug-2019 4:00 PM EDT
The Case for Retreat in the Battle Against Climate Change
University of Delaware

With sea level rise and extreme weather threatening coastal communities, it's no longer a question of whether they are going to retreat; it's where, when and how. In a new paper, researchers advocate for a managed and planned retreat, not a short-term spur of the moment reaction to a massive storm.

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Released: 9-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Marine heatwaves a bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, scientists find
University of New South Wales

Marine heatwaves are a much bigger threat to coral reefs than previously thought, research revealing a previously unrecognized impact of climate change on coral reefs has shown.

Released: 24-Jul-2019 4:40 PM EDT
Scientists: Recent Global Warming Outpaces Climate Changes of the Past 2,000 Years
Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University climate scientists led an international team in completing new reconstructions of Earth’s temperature over the past 2,000 years, placing the exceptional 20th-century warming into a longer-term context.

Newswise: Mysterious Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice Explained by Years of Robotic Data
7-Jun-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Mysterious Holes in Antarctic Sea Ice Explained by Years of Robotic Data
University of Washington

Why did a giant hole appear in the sea ice off Antarctica in 2016 and 2017, after decades of more typical sea ice cover? Years of Southern Ocean data have explained the phenomenon, helping oceanographers to better predict these features and study their role in global ocean cycles.

Released: 4-Jun-2019 2:30 AM EDT
Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought, study finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 3, 2019 – After conducting a comprehensive, seven-year survey of Patagonia, glaciologists from the University of California, Irvine and partner institutions in Argentina and Chile have concluded that the ice sheets in this vast region of South America are considerably more massive than expected. Through a combination of ground observations and airborne gravity and radar sounding methods, the scientists created the most complete ice density map of the area to date and found that some glaciers are as much as a mile (1,600 meters) thick.

Newswise: Mass Die-off of Puffins Recorded in the Bering Sea
23-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Mass Die-off of Puffins Recorded in the Bering Sea
PLOS

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE

Newswise: How Sea Level Rise Affects Birds in Coastal Forests
7-May-2019 1:30 PM EDT
How Sea Level Rise Affects Birds in Coastal Forests
North Carolina State University

Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation.

Newswise: As Climate Changes, Small Increases in Rainfall May Cause Widespread Road Outages
7-May-2019 3:10 PM EDT
As Climate Changes, Small Increases in Rainfall May Cause Widespread Road Outages
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

As more rain falls on a warming planet, a new computer model shows that it may not take a downpour to cause widespread disruption of road networks. The model combined data on road networks with the hills and valleys of topography to reveal “tipping points” at which even small localized increases in rain cause widespread road outages.

Newswise: Global Health Benefits of Climate Action Offset Costs
3-May-2019 3:15 PM EDT
Global Health Benefits of Climate Action Offset Costs
University of Vermont

New research in Nature Communications reports that immediate, dramatic cuts in carbon emissions – aggressive enough to meet the Paris Climate Agreement – are economically sound if human health benefits are factored in.

Newswise: Human Influence on Global Droughts Dates Back 100 Years
Released: 1-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Human Influence on Global Droughts Dates Back 100 Years
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Observations and climate reconstructions using data from tree rings confirm that human activity was affecting the worldwide drought risk as far back as the early 20th century.

Newswise: Global Warming Hits Sea Creatures Hardest
Released: 24-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Global Warming Hits Sea Creatures Hardest
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the study published in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Study Suggests Trees Are Crucial to the Future of Our Cities
Released: 25-Mar-2019 4:55 PM EDT
Study Suggests Trees Are Crucial to the Future of Our Cities
University of Wisconsin-Madison

The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun. But when that single tree is part of a small forest, it creates a profound cooling effect. According to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, trees play a big role in keeping our towns and cities cool.

Newswise: Study Suggests Climate Change Limits Forest Recovery After Wildfires
Released: 13-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Study Suggests Climate Change Limits Forest Recovery After Wildfires
University of Montana

New University of Montana research suggests climate change makes it increasingly difficult for tree seedlings to regenerate following wildfires in low-elevation forests, which could contribute to abrupt forest loss.

Newswise: Climate Change Could Devastate Painted Turtles, According to New Study
11-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Climate Change Could Devastate Painted Turtles, According to New Study
Iowa State University

Climate change could contribute to the demographic collapse of the painted turtle, a species that undergoes temperature-dependent sex determination. An Iowa State University scientist is sounding the alarm about the painted turtle’s future in a new study.

Newswise: Few Pathways to an Acceptable Climate Future Without Immediate Action, According to Study
6-Mar-2019 3:35 PM EST
Few Pathways to an Acceptable Climate Future Without Immediate Action, According to Study
Tufts University

A new comprehensive study of climate change has painted over 5 million pictures of humanity’s potential future, and few foretell an Earth that has not severely warmed. But with immediate action and some luck, there are pathways to a tolerable climate future, according to a research team led by Tufts University

Newswise: Can We Address Climate Change Without Sacrificing Water Quality?
Released: 27-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
Can We Address Climate Change Without Sacrificing Water Quality?
Carnegie Institution for Science

Washington, DC--Strategies for limiting climate change must take into account their potential impact on water quality through nutrient overload, according to a new study from Carnegie's Eva Sinha and Anna Michalak published by Nature Communications. Some efforts at reducing carbon emissions could actually increase the risk of water quality impairments, they found.

Newswise: Fossil Fuel Combustion Is the Main Contributor to Black Carbon Around the Arctic, International Study Finds
Released: 20-Feb-2019 5:05 AM EST
Fossil Fuel Combustion Is the Main Contributor to Black Carbon Around the Arctic, International Study Finds
Baylor University

Fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon collected at five sites around the Arctic, which has implications for global warming, according to a study by an international group of scientists that included a team from Baylor University.


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