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Newswise: From San Diego to Italy, Study Suggests Wisdom can Protect Against Loneliness
28-Sep-2020 4:40 PM EDT
From San Diego to Italy, Study Suggests Wisdom can Protect Against Loneliness
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and University of Rome La Sapienza examined middle-aged and older adults in San Diego and Cilento, Italy and found loneliness and wisdom had a strong negative correlation. The wiser the person, the less lonely they were.

Released: 30-Sep-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Financial distress linked to suicide risk in people with ADHD
Ohio State University

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is linked to higher levels of financial distress in adults – and a fourfold higher risk of suicide for those with the most debt, according to a large population study.

29-Sep-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Antipsychotics for Treating Adult Depression Linked with Higher Mortality
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers researchers have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant.

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Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Feeling stressed or down in a world with COVID? Try this writing tool
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new expressive writing tool allows people to put their thoughts and feelings into words to help relieve stress and anxiety. Participants are given a prompt and directed to write for 5-10 minutes, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings. A computer analyzes keywords and tone to provide feedback.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 Spurs Anxious, Upsetting Dreams
American Psychological Association (APA)

The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. The pandemic is affecting our dreams as well, infusing more anxiety and negative emotions into dreams and spurring dreams about the virus itself, particularly among women, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

24-Sep-2020 9:25 AM EDT
Loneliness levels high during COVID-19 lockdown
Newswise Review

During the initial phase of COVID-19 lockdown, rates of loneliness among people in the UK were high and were associated with a number of social and health factors, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jenny Groarke of Queen’s University Belfast, UK, and colleagues.

Newswise: Talking Alone: Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence Tools to Predict Loneliness
Released: 24-Sep-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Talking Alone: Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence Tools to Predict Loneliness
University of California San Diego Health

A team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
The psychosocial benefits of plastic surgery for young women with congenital breast asymmetry
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Nearly all women have breasts that are slightly different from each other. However, some women have more marked differences in the size, shape, or position of the breasts even after development is complete – leading to negative effects on emotional well-being and self-image.

Newswise: University of Kentucky Researchers Awarded NSF Grant to Engineer Better Mental Health Solutions
Released: 24-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
University of Kentucky Researchers Awarded NSF Grant to Engineer Better Mental Health Solutions
University of Kentucky

From the limited data currently available, Wilson, Hammer and Usher found that engineering students aren’t necessarily more likely to have a mental health concern, but they are significantly less likely to seek help than non-engineering college students. This treatment gap became the basis for their National Science Foundation (NSF) grant proposal titled, “Development of a Survey Instrument to Identify Mental Health Related Help-Seeking Beliefs in Engineering Students.”

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Released: 23-Sep-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Amyloid deposits not associated with depression in the elderly
Elsevier

Depression in elderly people can include symptoms such as memory loss, making it hard to distinguish from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Appoints Tiara C. Willie as New Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed Tiara C. Willie, PhD, MA, as a Bloomberg Assistant Professor of American Health in the Department of Mental Health.

Released: 23-Sep-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Neurotic College Students Could Benefit From Health Education
Binghamton University, State University of New York

College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more positive stress mindset, according to research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: Life in lockdown: health-wise, it’s not as bad as you think
Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:05 PM EDT
Life in lockdown: health-wise, it’s not as bad as you think
University of South Australia

While Victorians continue to endure restrictions from a second wave of COVID-19, new research from the University of South Australia is providing much-needed good news about people’s overall health and wellbeing following lockdown.

Newswise: Google search data reveals major panic attack issue, Tulane study shows
Released: 22-Sep-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Google search data reveals major panic attack issue, Tulane study shows
Tulane University

A team of researchers at Tulane University used Google search data to determine the extent of panic attacks related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts On COVID-19
Released: 22-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts On COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the lockdown with COVID-19 restrictions in place, an interactive gaming room built to accelerate stroke patient recovery in The Johns Hopkins Hospital wasn’t getting much use. The therapists and neurologists running the gaming room decided to make the room available to staff treating COVID-19 patients to allow them to decompress.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 10:35 AM EDT
ADHD Study Reveals Unique Genetic Differences in African American Patients with the Condition
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
For Black Girls, Attitudes About Being Black Affect Risk of Depression
North Carolina State University

A new study suggests that the messages Black girls hear at home about being Black, and about being Black women in particular, can increase or decrease their risk of exhibiting the symptoms of depression.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Childhood sexual abuse: mental and physical after-effects closely linked
Universite de Montreal

A new study has uncovered a correlation between psychological distress and genital and urinary health problems in female survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

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Released: 18-Sep-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 18, 2020 – Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic – such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study. The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Newswise: Researchers to use wearable device to measure resident wellness, prevent burnout
Released: 18-Sep-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Researchers to use wearable device to measure resident wellness, prevent burnout
Penn State College of Medicine

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine are conducting a study to determine if a wearable device can measure wellness and predict burnout among resident physicians. The results from the clinical trial could be used to develop targeted interventions for depression and burnout in graduate medical education.

Released: 17-Sep-2020 4:35 PM EDT
The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Southern Methodist University

Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness? You may actually be happier getting together with your friends, said SMU psychology professor Nathan Hudson.

Released: 17-Sep-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Violence Risk Assessment in Mental Health Care – Journal of Psychiatric Practice Outlines a Therapeutic Risk Management Approach
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Assessing the potential for violent behavior by patients with psychiatric disorders is an essential but challenging responsibility for mental health professionals. A five-part series currently being published in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice summarizes an expert approach to screening, assessment, and management of the risk of “other-directed violence.” The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: The Medical Minute: Preventing suicide during COVID-19
Released: 16-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT
The Medical Minute: Preventing suicide during COVID-19
Penn State Health

People contemplating suicide want help. As the COVID-19 pandemic raises the overall level of anxiety, a Penn State Health expert explains how you can help people in crisis in this week’s Medical Minute.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
The unintended consequence of becoming an empathetic person
Michigan State University

People generally want to improve on things like being more emotionally connected to others, but researchers found that this leads to changes in their political souls as well.

Newswise: Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to 
disordered eating among Italian-Australian women
Released: 15-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among Italian-Australian women
University of South Australia

“You have to eat!” It’s a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:55 PM EDT
Loneliness predicts development of type 2 diabetes
King's College London

Published in the journal Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]), the study shows that it is the absence of quality connections with people and not the lack of contact that predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes, suggesting that helping people form and experience positive relationships could be a useful tool in prevention strategies for type 2 diabetes.

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Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions
University of Missouri, Columbia

Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today.

Newswise: Scientists awarded $52M NIH grant to study schizophrenia cause and effect
Released: 15-Sep-2020 5:25 PM EDT
Scientists awarded $52M NIH grant to study schizophrenia cause and effect
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers and their colleagues from two other institutions have been awarded a $52 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead an international study to better understand the cause and effect of schizophrenia in high-risk youth.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 4:00 PM EDT
An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
University of Washington School of Medicine

Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care. In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulting psychiatrist. Consulting psychiatrists provide recommendations on patient care through weekly caseload reviews conducted online.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 3:25 PM EDT
UIC researcher to test voice-activated AI to manage mental health symptoms
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at University of Illinois Chicago are studying a novel approach to delivering care to those with moderate depression and anxiety: through artificial intelligence, or AI. The first part of the two-phase, five-year project will develop and test a voice-enabled, AI virtual agent named Lumen, trained to deliver Problem Solving Therapy (PST), for patients with moderate, untreated depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. This first phase is awarded for two years.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
With Digital Phenotyping, Smartphones May Play a Role in Assessing Severe Mental Illness
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings – combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data – have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: “Be Sensitive, Be Brave,” A New Culturally Sensitive Suicide Prevention Program, Now Underway in Santa Clara County, CA
Released: 15-Sep-2020 7:30 AM EDT
“Be Sensitive, Be Brave,” A New Culturally Sensitive Suicide Prevention Program, Now Underway in Santa Clara County, CA
Palo Alto University

A new suicide prevention training program developed by a team from Palo Alto University and the County of Santa Clara Behavioral Health Services Department aims to better prevent suicide by being more culturally aware of the populations it serves.

Newswise: Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows
10-Sep-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Loneliness doubled among older adults in first months of COVID-19, poll shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Staying close to home can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But a new national poll suggests it comes with a cost. In June of this year, 56% of people over the age of 50 said they sometimes or often felt isolated from others – more than double the 27% who felt that way in a similar poll in 2018.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ingalls Memorial Behavioral Health Services Expand to Calumet City
University of Chicago Medical Center

UChicago Medicine Ingalls Memorial Hospital will expand its behavioral health services to Calumet City, Illinois in September 2020, providing essential outpatient mental healthcare to Southland residents.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Children Will Wait to Impress Others—Another Twist on the Classic Marshmallow Test
Association for Psychological Science

When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Hosts Webinar Series About Gynecologic Cancers and Survivorship
Released: 9-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Hosts Webinar Series About Gynecologic Cancers and Survivorship
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In honor of Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, the Johns Hopkins Medicine Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service is hosting a series of 60-minute webinars during which top experts will address important issues related to gynecologic cancers and survivorship.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Receives $3.6 Million National Institute of Mental Health Grant for Firearm Safety Research
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A $3.6 million NIMH grant awarded to the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will help improve the implementation of an evidence-based firearm safety program and identify the best approach for deploying this program as a suicide prevention strategy.

Newswise: Mindfulness with Paced Breathing and Lowering Blood Pressure
Released: 9-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Mindfulness with Paced Breathing and Lowering Blood Pressure
Florida Atlantic University

Now more than ever, Americans and people all over the world are under increased stress, which may adversely affect their health and well-being. Researchers explore the possibility that mindfulness with paced breathing reduces blood pressure. One of the most plausible mechanisms is that paced breathing stimulates the vagus nerve and parasympathetic nervous system, which reduce stress chemicals in the brain and increase vascular relaxation that may lead to lowering of blood pressure.

Released: 9-Sep-2020 1:05 AM EDT
Sexual Minority Men Who Smoke Report Worse Mental Health and More Frequent Substance Use
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers.

Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:35 PM EDT
COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
Washington State University

Exercise has been shown to reduce anxiety and stress, but it may not be enough for the levels caused by COVID-19.


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