Curated News: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)

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Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:50 AM EST
Study Finds Lower Risk of Severe Infection and Hospitalization with Belimumab Compared to Oral Immunosuppressants
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, found that the biologic B-cell inhibitor belimumab was associated with a lower risk of severe infections and hospitalizations compared to nonbiologic immunosuppressants.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:20 AM EST
Holding Mycophenolate Mofetil for 10 Days or More May Improve COVID-19 Vaccine Response
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated that withholding mycophenolate mofetil for 10 days significantly increased antibody response after 2 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, without a significant increase in flares.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 11:05 AM EST
Study Finds AAV Characteristics and Treatments Vary Across Lifespan
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, demonstrated an association between age of diagnosis and clinical characteristics and treatments in Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis patients.

Newswise: Novel Study Identifies Key Molecular Players in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Released: 24-Oct-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Novel Study Identifies Key Molecular Players in Rheumatoid Arthritis
University of California San Diego

Using a novel systems biology approach, scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine have further parsed the cellular players and roles involved in rheumatoid arthritis, a complex disease that affects more than one million Americans in ways that have defied development of uniform treatments.

Newswise: Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Released: 4-Oct-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Scientists ID pathway that triggers mice to scratch when they see others do the same
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a pathway in the brains of mice that is activated when the animals see other mice scratching, but that pathway does not run through the visual cortex.

Newswise: New UCI-Led Study Reveals Characteristics of Stable Vitiligo Skin Disease
Released: 6-Jun-2022 4:05 PM EDT
New UCI-Led Study Reveals Characteristics of Stable Vitiligo Skin Disease
University of California, Irvine

A new study, led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine, reveals the unique cell-to-cell communication networks that can perpetuate inflammation and prevent repigmentation in patients with vitiligo disease.

Newswise: Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
27-Apr-2022 5:30 PM EDT
Neural Pathway Key to Sensation of Pleasant Touch Identified
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers from the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch and Sensory Disorders have identified a specific neuropeptide and a neural circuit that transmit pleasant touch from the skin to the brain. The findings eventually may help scientists better understand and treat disorders characterized by touch avoidance and impaired social development.

17-Mar-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Piezo1 Possible Key to Supporting Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Tracing the impact of a single protein, Piezo1, Penn researchers found that restoring it in muscles affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy could improve their ability to heal efficiently

13-Jan-2022 5:00 AM EST
Origin of Rare Disease FOP Rooted in Muscle Regeneration Dysfunction
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A mutation in the gene that causes fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) doesn’t just cause extra bone growth but is tied to a problem in generating new muscle tissue after injury

Released: 20-Oct-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Awarded Prestigious $4 Million Grant to Launch Skin Biology and Diseases Resource-based Center
Mount Sinai Health System

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is establishing a Skin Biology and Diseases Resource-based Center (SBDRC), funded by a $4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

1-Sep-2021 8:20 AM EDT
Drug Cocktail Reduces Aging-Associated Disc Degeneration
Thomas Jefferson University

Therapies that target aging cells early pave the way to easing back pain

31-Aug-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Rheumatoid arthritis treated with implanted cells that release drug
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have genetically engineered cells that, when implanted in mice, deliver a biologic drug in response to inflammation.

Released: 25-Aug-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Penn Center for Musculoskeletal Disorders NIH Grant Renewed for $4 Million
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The United States’ longest-running NIH-sponsored musculoskeletal research center will receive $4M to continue its studies of everything from ligament tears to osteoarthritis

Released: 7-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing.

14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.

Released: 18-Mar-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Chemical cocktail creates new avenues for generating muscle stem cells
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A UCLA-led research team has identified a chemical cocktail that enables the production of large numbers of muscle stem cells, which can self-renew and give rise to all types of skeletal muscle cells.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 1:40 PM EST
4D bioengineering materials bend, curve like natural tissue
University of Illinois Chicago

Researchers have developed new 4D hydrogels — 3D materials that have the ability to change shape over time in response to stimuli — that can morph multiple times in a preprogrammed or on-demand manner in response to external trigger signals.

   
Released: 24-Feb-2021 4:55 PM EST
New shape-changing 4D materials hold promise for morphodynamic tissue engineering
University of Illinois Chicago

New hydrogel-based materials that can change shape in response to psychological stimuli, such as water, could be the next generation of materials used to bioengineer tissues and organs, according to a team of researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago.

   
31-Jan-2021 7:00 PM EST
Study May Help Pregnant Women and Others ‘Scratch’ Spinal Morphine-Induced Itch
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Researchers identified spinal cord neurons responsible for an itchy sensation after an epidural morphine injection and found a drug that may fix the problem without reducing morphine’s pain-killing effects.

Released: 8-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
New Study Helps Forecast Functional Recovery Time and Return to Activities Following Hip Fracture Surgery
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

For patients undergoing surgery for a hip fracture, there are still unknowns regarding the return to pre-facture level of function, specifically in regard to driving and mobility. However, a new article published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons® (JAAOS®) further quantifies these outcomes. The study authors found that patients can expect to regain full functionality within two to three years after hip fracture surgery. The study also looked at the long-term psychosocial limitations of patients compared to peer groups and concluded that socialization may aid in recovery.

Released: 9-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
Novel Drug May Improve Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

A novel drug called vamorolone may improve the efficacy of corticosteroid treatment for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy — a rare form of inherited and progressive muscular dystrophy, according findings from a clinical trial published in the journal PLOS Medicine.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Study: Enzyme Could Prove Effective in Treating Tumors and Inflammatory Diseases in Lung
Henry Ford Health

Findings from a research study, led by scientists at Henry Ford, suggest an enzyme could play an important role in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases in the airway.

6-May-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Gene therapy in mice builds muscle, reduces fat
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests gene therapy one day may help build muscle and relieve pain in overweight patients with osteoarthritis.

Released: 26-Feb-2020 12:15 PM EST
Revving up immune system may help treat eczema
Washington University in St. Louis

Studying eczema, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that boosting the number of natural killer cells in the blood is a possible treatment strategy for the skin condition and also may help with related health problems, such as asthma.

Released: 5-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST
Mouse Study Shows Nerve Signaling Pathway Critical to Healing Fractures
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sticks and stones may break one’s bones, but healing them requires the production of a protein signal that stimulates the generation, growth and spread of vital nerve cells, or neurons, throughout the injured area. That’s the finding of a recent Johns Hopkins Medicine study that used mice to demonstrate what likely takes place during human fracture repair as well.


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